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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/12/2020 in all areas

  1. I changed my Profile Photo and Cover Photo to pictures I took. ;)
    4 points
  2. That is a Field Sparrow. Notice the orange crown stripes, pinkish-orange bill, and complete white eyering.
    4 points
  3. Tern array by johnd1964, on Flickr from a while back
    4 points
  4. Unless the image you're using is your own, you either need permission from the image owner or the image must be in the public domain. That doesn't just apply to profile photos here, that's the law across the United States and across all media. The Internet made it easy for some people to intentionally violate this law. The Internet also made it easy for some content owners to willingly distribute their materials for free. With the increase of both of these practices, many people have assumed all content on the Internet is free, unintentionally breaking the because they assumed what is common practice must be legal. Please note that I'm NOT accusing you of intentional copyright violation. I only want to point out how Internet users in general reached the point where they assume they can copy and paste at will.
    4 points
  5. Ah. I thought we were talking about artillery shells landing!
    3 points
  6. It’s an immature male Common Goldeneye. The incoming white circle (not crescent), head and bill shape, and large amount of white on the wing all rule out Barrow’s. Nice photo.
    3 points
  7. Hoping some little birds will return soon. Full disclosure - this one is from Monday (I'm always behind with my editing).
    3 points
  8. Yellow-bellied Elaenia Olive-throated Parakeet Green Kingfisher Rufous-tailed Hummingbird
    2 points
  9. Tree and Cliff, Red-tailed, California Gull.
    2 points
  10. Common Goldeneye.
    2 points
  11. Juvenile Red-tailed Hawk. Maybe Harlan's subspecies. Ferruginous has longer, narrower tipped wings, broader head with longer gape, and clean white underside to primaries and secondaries - even on the dark morphs - without all that barring. Adult Harris's is distinctive. Juvenile Harris's would have rusty underwing coverts and a longer, white based tail.
    2 points
  12. Purple sheen on a Mallard's head usually suggests some domestic genes mixed in. Also, unusually large waterfowl (whether ducks or geese), especially if they are unusually full-chested and with a fat belly that hangs down almost to the ground, suggests domestic influence.
    2 points
  13. Yellow Rumped Warbler and Mallard. The mallard may have some domestic genes mixed in or something.
    2 points
  14. Yes, looks good for Red-breasted Merganser. Note the thin, upturned red bill and lack of contrast between the breast and head.
    2 points
  15. 2 points
  16. Red crossbill stuffed with pine nuts
    2 points
  17. I am off of crutches! I broke my leg Feb 4th, it was a 60 percent offset. I Had surgery on Feb 7th, (A plate and six screws.) And to day March 10th I am walking! Just 38 days!
    2 points
  18. Not a great photo but at least caught this. This bird showed up new as I just put up a Suet Cake feeder and likes it very much. I have never seen this bird in our area before so new to me. Can you help me with identity?
    1 point
  19. Yes, both look good for Lesser Scaup.
    1 point
  20. Portland, Oregon this morning at the wetland this duck appeared and not sure of correct name. Can you help me?
    1 point
  21. I don't see any sign of a shoulder spur and the proportions look better for a Downy, in my opinion. Dimensions of the suet feeder would help, I guess.
    1 point
  22. 1 point
  23. Oh dear, I think I am morphing quickly into a cranky old man (good thing I am the only one on this forum) - as proof my son hits 50 this weekend. Charlie, today was a pretty good example of what you can be up against with wildlife/bird photography. This was a beautiful day for Southern Ontario at this time of year - 8C (guessing 45F) and sun all day, absolutely no change in lighting. Two photos below under exactly the same conditions. Photo 1. Trumpeter out in the open - camera was already set at 1/640 and F10 with auto ISO - camera selected ISO 100. Photo 2. Muskrat somewhat in the shade - same shutter speed and aperture - camera selected ISO 7200. This is a difference of 6.5 EVs (Exposure Values), or full aperture/shutter speed increments (requiring 1/8 second rather than 1/640 if sticking to ISO 100) and may explain what you were finding when you were trying to balance exposure in the manual mode. For the second photo I was also shooting a Mink (a particular favourite of mine) at the same time in the background. It was finding a meal (a mouse based on the tail hanging out of its mouth), eating it and then cleaning itself on a tree branch, so auto ISO allowed me to jump between the subjects. If you are "focused" on just one subject in constant lighting conditions then M mode is certainly viable and provides more control. However, if you are out on the trails and want to be ready for whatever comes along ................ Definitely my last post on this thread, I will never come back, honestly.
    1 point
  24. ugh! how could i have missed that!?? thanks so much!! and.... thats a lifer! ? (sad, but true)
    1 point
  25. Hi! I think this might be a Savannah sparrow but it looks like the supercilium (?) is too yellow. Perhaps I just don't appreciate how much variation there is based on what I see in my Peterson and Sibley field guides. Confirmation or correction would be greatly appreciated. Thanks very much! Chris
    1 point
  26. 1 point
  27. sure... just let me talk to my wife LOL
    1 point
  28. Transitioning to adult plumage I think. A wildlife photographer friend got all excited a few days ago as he thought he had found a Barrow's (pretty rare here) but it was the white of a partially formed circle in the shape of a crescent. I've noticed a lot of immature Goldeneyes at the moment have a faint white cheek circle.
    1 point
  29. Come to central SC. I'll put you on three before lunch.
    1 point
  30. Actually banding near the tips of the outermost primaries (P9 and P10) suggests juvenile Harlan's to me, juvenile dark morph calurus usually would have more solidly dark underside to tips of P9 and P10. But subspecific identification of Red-tailed Hawks, and especially juveniles, can be difficult and in some cases impossible due to extreme plumage variation even within subspecies. I would say this is probably Harlan's subspecies.
    1 point
  31. I think the lighting makes it look grayer than it really is, but the combination of habitat (salt marsh - near beach) and overall grayish coloration seems sufficient to ID as Clapper Rail.
    1 point
  32. That's another difference between budget point-and-shoots/bridge cameras and DSLRs. My DSLR has much less noise than my point-and-shoots at higher ISOs. Or at least the noise isn't as annoying.
    1 point
  33. 1 point
  34. It's a Red-shouldered Hawk. Note the translucent crescents on the last picture.
    1 point
  35. Very dull gray. Looks good for Clapper.
    1 point
  36. I would say yellow-rumped warbler
    1 point
  37. Is the hardware permanent or just there during the healing? "Better. ... Stronger ... Faster ... We can make the world's first bionic birder." - Yeah, that one's going past most of the audience in this particular thread. Just say 'Okay, Boomer ' and we'll move on.
    1 point
  38. Ouch! Hope you feel better soon. Good thing you're a YOUNG birder!
    1 point
  39. In order to wrap this thread up I had thought about something like the following but decided not to. After much lengthy and heated debate the WBIDAC (WhatBird ID Awards Committee) has decided to present the following prizes: Winner: @Jefferson Shank for outstanding (and speedy) ID skills under exceptionally arduous conditions. Second: @Jim W for outstanding ingenuity in demonstrating that his particular ID choice (the Narwahl) is indeed capable of flight - the incorporation of the mysterious artifact was brilliant. Third: @AlexHenry for outstanding persistence, against the odds, of sticking with his choice to the end. Unfortunately the prizes previously referenced are no longer available but the winners may choose any prize up to a maximum value up $4.99 including postage. Please note the WBIDAC only meets once a year so there may be a delay in delivering the prizes. Probably good that I decided not to do this.
    1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. Note the syntax of this species' name -- Black-necked Stilt. It's a stilt with a black neck, not a black stilt with a neck. "Black" and "necked" form a compound adjective and modify "stilt" together, not independently. Note also that it is "Great Crested Flycatcher," not "Great-crested Flycatcher," as the species certainly lacks a "great crest." Instead, it is a large flycatcher with a crest, so "great" and "crested" are modifying "flycatcher" independently of each other.
    1 point
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