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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/25/2020 in Posts

  1. Varied Thrush - March 24, 2020
    10 points
  2. 7 points
  3. Male Horned Lark near Cheyenne, Wyoming.
    4 points
  4. Fartin' Frank couldn't figure out why none of of the other Geese would hang out with him........ IMG_3216-001 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    3 points
  5. Lastly, to get to Bachman's Warbler, you'd have to ignore the extensive white in the tail and the strong white supercilium. Bird ID is not just finding a character or two in the field guide, it also involves ruling out EVERYTHING ELSE.
    3 points
  6. That is actually a Tennessee Warbler. Note the lack of wingbars, the gray head with dark eyeline and white supercilium, the white underside, and the green back.
    3 points
  7. This is a brand new species for me. A Golden-fronted Woodpecker
    3 points
  8. A local wetland has a low number of waterfowl this year but a good variety. This Northern Pintail flew in unexpectedly while I was photographing some Bufflehead.
    3 points
  9. I have a habitat(big Rubbermaid tote) in my basement for all these guys... just doing my part to save some species.🤪
    2 points
  10. 2 points
  11. 2 days ago at the lodge. Love Madera Canyon, things are starting to hop. Broad-billed, Rivoli's, Rufus and Black Chinned seen so far.
    2 points
  12. It's been a while since I had something to post. Here's a Royal Tern
    2 points
  13. 2 points
  14. Despite a perfectly synchronized performance from the boys Harriet was still not impressed.
    2 points
  15. A have a bridge camera too, a Canon Powershot G3X. It has amazing quality for 600mm zoom.
    1 point
  16. The large family of American Crows that lives around my house (I call them The Corvid-19) lost one of its members this morning in my backyard. The group was making a horrific racket and mobbing a large bird. I just caught a brief glimpse of the offender as it flew off through the woods. I believe it was on owl, but not entirely certain. However, the culprit left behind these two feathers. Can anyone help me with the ID? (PS. The group is still out there squawking incessantly around the headless corpse of their fallen comrade in the middle of my lawn. They are mourning for sure. Kind of sad really.)
    1 point
  17. My Mom and I share a Canon SX-50.
    1 point
  18. You should invest in a high-quality lens, which is more important than the camera body itself. I personally use a Canon 7D Mark II with a Canon 100-400mm L IS II lens. It's a really nice combo for amateur photographers.
    1 point
  19. I’m pretty sure Beanie Babies are in the endangered species list.
    1 point
  20. It's a European Starling.
    1 point
  21. Not a Hutton’s. It’s a Plumbeous/Cassin’s. I’m not sure that Cassin’s are very common in SE AZ so I’ll go with Plumbeous.
    1 point
  22. Agree with Brown-headed Cowbird.
    1 point
  23. Agreed, Brown-headed.
    1 point
  24. 2015 Laughing Gull Foot Missing by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  25. Brown-headed Cowbird.
    1 point
  26. it's a very rare phenomena that few have captured on film... certain bird species produce an excess of electricity(kind of like when we shock each other with static electricity) and the result is a brief laser show out the birds back end. Usually only happens under dry conditions. It's been known to start a forest fire or two.
    1 point
  27. Agreed. See my avatar for an adult male.
    1 point
  28. Remind me again why I wasted those 'Likes' on you?
    1 point
  29. Tricolored Blackbirds and first of spring Swainson's Hawks
    1 point
  30. 2014 spotted sandpiper by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  31. Here's a photo of me when I was 1 year old. Taken in 1947. Is this old enough???? 😁 Wayne J Smith at one year old_edited by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    1 point
  32. Turkey Vulture from 2014. Don't think I've gotten this good of a view of a (wild) TUVU since. Turkey Vulture by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr
    1 point
  33. 1 point
  34. Thrasher in the Mojave Desert Mar 20 2020. Camera Sony A7II w Tamron 150 - 600mm from about 20 ft. away.
    1 point
  35. Agree with leucistic Song Sparrow.
    1 point
  36. This is a Lesser for the reasons Jerry Friedman mentioned, especially the fact that the white wing wing bar is only present in the secondaries, and stops before the primaries. That's diagnostic, if I remember correctly. Head shape is variable and hard to assess in one photos.
    1 point
  37. I agree about the great photo. With the narrow black nail on the bill and especially the white on the upper side of the wing stopping abruptly at the joint, I'm in favor of Lesser, but keep waiting for the more informed.
    1 point
  38. These are female/immature Red-breasted Mergansers. As you were saying, Common Mergansers have a white chin, cleaner border between the head and breast coloring, and a shorter, thicker-based bill.
    1 point
  39. Agreed with first-winter White-crowned. Immatures have a similar head pattern to adults but have brown and gray (not black and white) stripes.
    1 point
  40. Welcome to the forum, @kleve1972! I agree with Lincoln's Sparrow. Note the neat appearance with fine, crisp streaks, gray face with pale eyering, and buffy wash across breast. Like @HamRHead said, Song Sparrows would have coarser streaking and lack the buffy wash across the breast. Just to note, the sparrow in the background is a White-crowned Sparrow.
    1 point
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