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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/26/2020 in all areas

  1. Western Kingbird and Yellow-billed Magpie
    9 points
  2. This photo isn't as sharp as I would have liked, but I decided to post it. I normally see Cape May Warblers maybe 5-6 times a year and feel fortunate to ever get a photo of one. It was a bit unusual to see one this early in the year in this area (Chapel Hill, NC) and this was a long range shot which I cropped more than normal for me. Even though it isn't a real sharp photo, I was happy to get it. Cape May Warbler by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    8 points
  3. Evening Grosbeak - March 25, 2020
    7 points
  4. Going through my archives and wanted to verify that I ID'd these correctly. Three are the same bird, but don't recall if the in flight shot is though. Seen at DeSoto NWR, IA, back on 4/16/2018. Was this a Wilson's Snipe?
    4 points
  5. Spotted Sandpiper (Identified by whatbird forum members)
    3 points
  6. In flight, note the only the toes project beyond the tail; on Lesser, more than just the toes projects. The difference between the two is quite similar to that between Black-crowned and Yellow-crowned night-herons.
    3 points
  7. Canada lynx from this past summer...
    3 points
  8. Thanks for the quick response. My 5 year old grandson told me he saw a dove that "wasn't like the others" and this was it. Now I can give him an answer
    3 points
  9. 3 points
  10. Seen yesterday at Loess Bluffs NWR in NW Missouri. I have a few shots of them next to an American Avocet, if that'd help with size comparison. I don't think I ever saw them fly, but they never strayed more than a foot apart. My immediate thought was Wilson's Snipe, but now I'm leaning towards Long-billed Dowitcher.
    2 points
  11. Yes, Greater Yellowlegs. Note that the bill is longer than the head and slightly upturned. The Greater Yellowlegs' plumage is essentially identical to Lesser Yellowlegs; gray upperparts with white speckling, and white belly. Proportions are more important for separating two species; bill longer than the head and slightly upturned. Larger overall size than Lesser Yellowlegs with longer neck, blockier head, and bigger chest
    2 points
  12. Going through my archives and wanted to verify that I ID'd these correctly. All the same bird, seen at L oess Bluffs NWR, MO, back on 10/31/2017. Was this a Wilson's Snipe?
    2 points
  13. Agree with Short-billed Dowitchers. I love the pictures! Sort-billed Dowitchers sides are barred, not spotted like Long-billed Dowitcher, otherwise extremely similar to Long-billed in all plumages, especially winter when both species are plain gray. Long-billed tends to favor freshwater habitats, but much overlap. Most obvious difference is voice; Short-billed gives rapid series of notes "tu-tu-tu" unlike single piercing "keek!" of Long-billed.
    2 points
  14. Commorant by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  15. Adding one more pic. In lieu of any flight shots, I hope this yoga stretch may help with wing plumage?
    2 points
  16. Tree Swallow is correct. No American, just Tree Swallow.
    2 points
  17. Looks like a Pine Warbler to me. Wait for more opinions.
    2 points
  18. 2 points
  19. Varied Thrush - March 24, 2020
    2 points
  20. Great job of focusing through the trees!!! šŸ‘šŸ‘
    1 point
  21. Saw him or her this afternoon. Thanks for your help!
    1 point
  22. I agree with Wilson's Snipe. Your photos are absolutely AMAZING!
    1 point
  23. If you wouldn't mind, would you be more specific about the location next time? Which bay? We have members all over (and outside!) North America. Thanks!
    1 point
  24. Also yes for Wilson's Snipe.
    1 point
  25. Yep! Those streaks down the back are notable.
    1 point
  26. These look better for Short-billed Dowitchers.
    1 point
  27. 145, with latest being Cackling Geese. I have the only sighting of a Summer Tanager in the county. Prior to all the lockdowns I had decided to do a Big Year for the yard anyway. My high was 117 from last year. Iā€™m at 58 so far this year and am 3 for 3 this year on Big Day highs, by month.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. Well I'm no expert but recently asked on here about one I saw that was the same and learned it was a spotted sandpiper. Now to sit back and see if either I get corrected or I learned that lesson well enough to pass with a C minus šŸ™„
    1 point
  30. Beautiful photo, and bird! You still have snow?!? It was 96 here today!
    1 point
  31. None of the accipiters have such striking white markings on wings. Additionally, any accipiter with barring below (thus, an adult) will have a dark crown contrasting more or less strongly with the face, unlike both Red-shouldered and Broad-winged hawks.
    1 point
  32. Northern Mockingbird; the side feathers are covering the wing bars
    1 point
  33. I agree with Pine, habitat and all.
    1 point
  34. Yes, Pine Warbler.
    1 point
  35. Re-found a Summer Tanager that is continuing around Pismo Beach Butterfly Groves, Pismo Beach, CA.
    1 point
  36. it's a very rare phenomena that few have captured on film... certain bird species produce an excess of electricity(kind of like when we shock each other with static electricity) and the result is a brief laser show out the birds back end. Usually only happens under dry conditions. It's been known to start a forest fire or two.
    1 point
  37. Male Horned Lark near Cheyenne, Wyoming.
    1 point
  38. Thought @Melierax might appreciate these...
    1 point
  39. Tricolored Blackbirds and first of spring Swainson's Hawks
    1 point
  40. A local wetland has a low number of waterfowl this year but a good variety. This Northern Pintail flew in unexpectedly while I was photographing some Bufflehead.
    1 point
  41. Seen this afternoon at Loess Bluffs NWR in NW Missouri. Is this any of the three guesses in the title, or am I way off?
    1 point
  42. March 2017 - Ivory Gull on the Flint River in Flint, Michigan. Without a doubt the sketchiest place I have ever birded - the kind of place you don't feel comfortable carrying binoculars and scope around, but you can't leave them in your car either - Flint makes Oakland CA seem super nice. Felt pretty strange to see such a cool bird in the midst of depressing urban decay...
    1 point
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