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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/03/2020 in all areas

  1. Chipping Sparrow by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    6 points
  2. Just based on structure, I like Boat-tailed for the first two photos and a Bronzed Common for the last photo.
    5 points
  3. Seen yesterday at Loess Bluffs NWR in NW Missouri.
    4 points
  4. Black-bellied Plover in non-breeding plumage
    4 points
  5. That is a Sora... a type of Rail
    4 points
  6. ok I think I may have figured out the likes guys, so I think that each like is on its own 24 hour cycle, so if you liked someones post at 9am(using just one like) then used no more likes for for a while and used the rest(14) of them at 7 30pm you would have no likes in till 9am the next morning at witch point you would get back the single like you used yesterday morning.
    4 points
  7. Common Grackles have a big-headed appearance and stouter bills than Boat-taileds.
    3 points
  8. The shape and proportions of their head, eyes, and bill are what I mainly look for, but color and tail length can help.
    3 points
  9. I'll link to the wildlife art portion of my blog. Hope that's okay. https://gscartwork.blogspot.com/search/label/Wildlife
    3 points
  10. 3 points
  11. 3 points
  12. 3 points
  13. Seen yesterday at Loess Bluffs NWR in NW Missouri. This one was in the same location as the Lesser Yellowlegs posted earlier, but about 6 hours later. And in the 3rd photo, what are the two shorebirds in front of the Yellowlegs?
    2 points
  14. Reminded of what? Is today the day to put out the garbage, or............Oh, yeah!!! Reminding me to post a challenge!! I remember now!! OK, I'll think of something and post it after it gets dark here, in a couple of hours. Thanks for the reminder! ?
    2 points
  15. The last picture is identifiable as a Common Grackle, I believe, due to the bronze coloration on its chest. A Boat-tailed Grackle would not portray bronze coloring like that, particularly not in that bold a color. This individual is comparable to the Common Grackle from this link https://ebird.org/species/comgra if you would like further examples.
    2 points
  16. Could the second one be a Carolina Wren?
    2 points
  17. Lesser Yellowlegs and Pectoral Sandpipers.
    2 points
  18. I'm with Akandula -- the second bird is in side lighting, and fairly harsh side lighting at that, creating an artifact of gray underparts... as in https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/219996991#_ga=2.246822274.785834017.1585270112-1184313056.1549327880 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/213654441#_ga=2.256384397.785834017.1585270112-1184313056.1549327880 FOTEs can seem to be gray-bellied even in flat lighting -- https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/173082651#_ga=2.252648719.785834017.1585270112-1184313056.1549327880 I think that the thick-billed and long-legged appearance is more reliable than horribly lit plumage features.
    2 points
  19. The light orange bill/legs, light-colored wingtips and long tail all make these terns Forster's.
    2 points
  20. Yes, Northern Rough-winged Swallow.
    2 points
  21. I didn't realize Canada Geese were so hard to see in the south. Around here, if somebody said that they never saw a goose they'd need their eyes checked immediately.
    2 points
  22. Evening Grosbeak - April 2, 2020
    2 points
  23. Glanced out the window and saw this Robin and Northern Flicker just chillin' with each other. I imagine they are discussing how peaceful it is with all the Humans staying indoors! lol
    2 points
  24. Ah, but this is discussion of the web site, not birds. All members' opinions are equally (in)valid.
    2 points
  25. These are phalaropes. Look like Red to me, but I don’t have a ton of experience with them.
    2 points
  26. Here's mine! https://idahobirder.weebly.com/
    2 points
  27. Also see ME occurrence graph This is for the entire state of Maine, so you can expect frequency in early April to be higher in southern Maine. As example, here's the same graph, but for York and Cumberland counties. As you can see, frequency in the first week of April is twice that of the statewide value and right around the 1% value that I use as a guideline distinguishing between rare and not rare. Finally, this has been a crazy spring, with many species being found farther north than typical for the time of year.
    2 points
  28. 2 points
  29. Hello, I'm trying to sort all of my bird photos, and I came across this one I could not identify. The picture was taken April 7, 2015 in Central Florida on the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Attached are two of the pictures I took. Thanks in advance for the help!
    1 point
  30. All the yellowlegs are Lessers. Note the short, needle-like bill and compact appearance.
    1 point
  31. I think this is the proper way to look at this one just because of the fact that there is only one photo and it is not great quality, I would just leave it as greater/lesser scaup
    1 point
  32. Agree with Lesser Yellowlegs. I believe that a Greater would have a longer more upturned bill than the bird in your photos.
    1 point
  33. 1 point
  34. Tight flock of small, pale shorebirds flying low over open ocean water along the California coast in winter is almost always one of two things - Red Phalaropes or Sanderlings.
    1 point
  35. I agree with Red Phalaropes. (That's makes 7 votes for Red now!) ?
    1 point
  36. Not very good but my best one for today
    1 point
  37. Looks good for a Trumpeter.
    1 point
  38. 1 and 3 Are Red-shouldered hawks. 2 Is a blue jay.
    1 point
  39. There are no sports on TV, we're under lockdown and it IS springtime! Tree Swallows at San Jacinto Wildlife Area yesterday.
    1 point
  40. Here's a photo of me when I was 1 year old. Taken in 1947. Is this old enough???? ? Wayne J Smith at one year old_edited by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    1 point
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