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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/05/2020 in all areas

  1. 8 points
  2. I photographed this Pied-billed Grebe on a local pond this morning as a thin layer of fog began to lift.
    8 points
  3. Happy Sunday! Taken in Panama City at the Conservation Park April 4. Red-Shouldered Hawk? I see very similar pictures to a broad winged hawk on Audubon/birdseye apps... What would a major field marker be to tell the difference? Thanks! Also, off topic - came across a red-morph eastern screech owl enjoying the morning sun... Lifer for me! ?
    5 points
  4. Yellow-crowned Night-Heron Great Blue Heron A gigantic Mountain Bluebird The problem with eyewitness testimony is that eyewitnesses are generally really poor at it. There is an extensive -- and I mean EXTENSIVE -- literature on the fallibility of eyewitness reports. Our brains are incredibly good at MIS-interpreting information. There are no bird species that occur regularly in New Jersey that are entirely blue. Mountain Bluebird has occurred, but it eats mice even more infrequently than does Merlin. New or inexperienced birders are regularly stumped in situations of seeing common species in poor or odd lighting, situations that experienced birders have learned to account for by making weird mistakes earlier in their birding lives.
    5 points
  5. Agree with Savannah. It does have yellow supralorals, but some Savannahs don't have yellow there and some Songs can have yellow tinted superciliums. But Song Sparrows have longer tails and a larger gray bill and they're more of a rich brown color. They also typically have gray cheeks and coarser, blurrier streaking.
    4 points
  6. That is an Eastern Phoebe. Note the brownish colored back with a darker head, weak wingbars, no eyering, completely black bill, upright posture, and large-headed appearance.
    4 points
  7. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    4 points
  8. Stretching Brown-Headed Cowbird
    4 points
  9. Chipping Sparrow by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    4 points
  10. It might just be a very old female that has lost so much female hormone that it's expressing male plumage. The peach colored throat is a feature of adult female Red-wingeds. In birds, unlike in mammals such as ourselves, male is the default sex. That is, male is the homozygous sex, rather than female, which is heterozygous. That means that female hormones override the expression of male plumage characters in female birds. When those hormone levels drop below some threshold, male plumage features can begin being expressed -- that is, not overridden. However, I believe that soft-parts coloration, if they differ between the sexes (such as in Bushtit and most ducks), is not affected, as the soft parts are not replaced. Whatever the cause, that bird is COOL!
    3 points
  11. Finally, the why: The bird is a Broad-winged because both of its parents were Broad-wingeds. ?
    3 points
  12. Both are indeed Bonaparte's. Also note the black bill.
    2 points
  13. I mistake doves and pigeons for falcons ALL THE TIME, particularly if I’m driving and only have seconds to view.
    2 points
  14. In some areas it is a common practice to add dye to small ponds and water features - maybe someone went overboard on their concentration and then this fella found it. ?
    2 points
  15. 2 points
  16. Yes, it's a Red-shouldered. Appears to be a youngish one with the abundance of brown on the wings. Broad-winged Hawks are more compact and they lack the white markings on the wings, and the adults have darker reddish-brown barring on the breast and their tail pattern is slightly different with the white bands being the same width as the dark bands.
    2 points
  17. Northern Parula Northern Parula White-eyed Vireo Black-and-White Warbler Common Grackle
    2 points
  18. Yes, Cooper's Hawk. Note the capped appearance
    2 points
  19. I took this photo on Wednesday, just two days before @Bird Brain posted his challenge. So close.
    2 points
  20. Worst 'Best' photos ever posted. Man, them little suckers is fast!
    2 points
  21. I took these photos this morning in Laurel, MD. I can't quite figure out if I am really seeing the yellow on the lores. Could this be a Savannah? Your help is appreciated.
    1 point
  22. Same here. Thanks, everyone!
    1 point
  23. I didn't really have a chance with that last one either. They're quite uncommon here. I get very excited when I see a mockingbird anywhere!
    1 point
  24. How about a Raven?? ? Haha just kidding.
    1 point
  25. Idaho is special I guess. We don't have Mockingbirds here either ?
    1 point
  26. The first one shows the same behavior I've seen twice in the last two weeks, perching on a high utility pole. Previously I'd only seen cowbirds on the ground or at feeders.
    1 point
  27. Red-shouldered. Congrats, on the owl!
    1 point
  28. Outstanding little owl! Congrats on the lifer!
    1 point
  29. Looks like an Eastern Phoebe, but would like to know location.
    1 point
  30. @The Bird Nuts for the win!
    1 point
  31. Seen last Monday at St. Mary's Island WMA in western Iowa. Was this a Song Sparrow or a Lincoln's Sparrow? Or neither?
    1 point
  32. I was so close to winning!! .........….except this photo was taken on Wed...……..and I'm pretty sure it wasn't an evergreen tree ;)
    1 point
  33. they're getting more common in winter in florida, idek how I hadn't seen one in 9 years lol
    1 point
  34. I betcha this is one of the weirdest poses you'll ever get from a bird!
    1 point
  35. Evening Grosbeak - April 2, 2020
    1 point
  36. Glanced out the window and saw this Robin and Northern Flicker just chillin' with each other. I imagine they are discussing how peaceful it is with all the Humans staying indoors! lol
    1 point
  37. Yes, I'd think that would be mating behavior. It usually happens in spring. The male gives the female food either for maintaining the bond, "testing" his foraging skills (to see if he can help rear the young), or increasing the female's fitness for egg-laying. Isn't it really cool to watch? I just saw a male cardinal give food to his mate.
    1 point
  38. Yes, that's a nonbreeding adult/immature Common Loon. Note the dark hefty bill and spur of white on the neck. While in flight, the large feet trail behind.
    1 point
  39. Agreed. Also note that the streaking on the breast connects to that auricular patch.
    1 point
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