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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/06/2020 in all areas

  1. White-eyed Vireo by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    7 points
  2. 4 points
  3. You are correct! Note the long, somewhat "rectangular" shaped wings held straight out, the wedge shaped tail (almost raven-like shape), and a big head and bill that extends far out past the wings. This shape rules anything else out - Turkey Vultures have much smaller heads and bills and hold their wings in a dihedral, Accipiters like Cooper's Hawks have much shorter, broader wings and proportionately longer tails (often not held spread out like that) and are much smaller overall, and Buteos like Red-tailed Hawks have less rectangular-shaped wings with more of a "secondary bulge" and shorter, broader tails, and smaller heads and bills. In my opinion, Bald Eagles are actually somewhat reminiscent in shape of Common Ravens more so than most of the other raptors like hawks, ospreys, harriers, vultures, etc.
    4 points
  4. Black-crowned Night Heron, juvenile.
    4 points
  5. Blame Microsoft for that. PowerPoint, SharePoint, OneDrive, etc. Unfortunately, it's spread to other companies and the Internet in general.
    3 points
  6. Crested Caracara by johnd1964, on Flickr
    3 points
  7. The yellow under-tail coverts on bird #1 rule out Pine. The lack of obvious white tail spots also do that job. However, they do it for Palm, too; but even more so. I'd go with Yellow, as I believe that I see yellow tail spots. I'm a bit worried in that the legs look dark, but that could be an artifact. I don't like Tennessee for the second bird, but primarily because it's really unlikely in the southeast in spring, as it's a circum-Gulf migrant. However, I cannot come up with a solution to that one. I considered Yellow-throated Vireo, but I think that we can see enough of the wings to see wing bars if they were present. I like "passerine sp."
    3 points
  8. I think this looks better for a Hermit Thrush. The face and breast lack the buffy tones that I would expect on Swainson’s, and there appears to be a reddish tail. Also, Swainson’s would be very rare in early March in Mississippi.
    3 points
  9. Why not Orange-crowned? It's quite green and the wings are very plain.
    3 points
  10. could three possibly just be a rough-winged? asking because I don't know my swallows very well.
    2 points
  11. It's an adult male, which are often called "Gray Ghosts."
    2 points
  12. Yes you are correct - male Northern Harrier Slender raptors that fly like paper airplanes pale gray above white below with white patch on rump visible in second photo
    2 points
  13. Hermit Thrush -- eye ring is whitish with no obvious buff supraloral line to make spectacles At least, that's how I see it. More and better pix would be useful.
    2 points
  14. Orange-crowned -- it has eye arcs and a black eyeline. The underparts are too dull for Wilson's and none of the wing feathers have yellow fringes, ruling out Yellow.
    2 points
  15. Me either! It rained all Yesterday, had somthing this morning, and by then @Jodi Nielson had found one!
    2 points
  16. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    2 points
  17. I photographed this Pied-billed Grebe on a local pond this morning as a thin layer of fog began to lift.
    2 points
  18. This is indeed a Cooper’s.
    1 point
  19. Agree with Tree Swallow and Violet-green Swallow for 1 and 2, respectively. Note how the dark comes down around the whole eye and face on the Tree Swallow, Violet-greens have more white in the face. And then the white wrapping around the side of the Violet-green Swallow's rump in the second photo. 3rd I'm not sure, throat looks pretty pale for Cliff Swallow but that could be the lighting.
    1 point
  20. #1 looks good for a tree swallow. #2 looks like a Violet Green Swallow.(?) #3 possible Cliff Swallow?
    1 point
  21. Bill and tail look too long for Calliope and overall shape is not as compact or hunched up as I would expect. Don’t see any peachy wash in flanks either. I don’t think this is Calliope. I don’t think it’s Anna’s either. I like Black-chinned or Costa’s here but not sure. Maybe leaning Black-chinned due to shape. Wait for other responses.
    1 point
  22. @Rocky Welcome to the forum! Orange-crowned Warblers can look quite different, from almost all yellow to drab blue-grey colored .
    1 point
  23. Welcome to Whatbird! That's a Baltimore Oriole. Note the orange-colored body, with 2 white wingbars and a long, pointed bill.
    1 point
  24. Whimbrel and Short-billed Dowitchers.
    1 point
  25. You are correct! Male and female Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers.
    1 point
  26. And "juvenile" is correct. Juvs in fresher plumage have medium brown bellies only slightly contrasting with very dark brown chest. However, those belly feathers seems to bleach on some/many individuals, producing your white-bellied bird, which is reminiscent of the next two plumages of Bald Eagle (called White-belly I and White-belly II). However, the saw-toothed trailing edge of the wings of your bird (seen best in the 1st pic) indicate that all of the secondaries are juvenile feathers, as they're quite pointed, compared to the rounded secondaries of older birds. Here are March-April examples of three plumages: Juvenile plumage Second basic plumage - note that outer secondaries have been replaced with shorter, rounder adult-type feathers; then there are two juvenile secondaries, then two or three adult-type secondaries, and then the rest are juvenile secondaries Third basic plumage - note that the bird retains only four juvenile secondaries, in two groups of two and that the bill is getting extensively yellow Fourth basic plumage is, essentially, the transition from extensively juvenile-like plumage to extensively adult-like plumage. These birds have variable amount of dark in head and tail and white on wings, belly, and back. Fifth basic plumage is, for most individual Balds, the first full adult plumage, however, many don't quite make it, retaining some bits of immaturity, usually on head and tail.
    1 point
  27. Are we still searching for a raven or crow on a roof? I've seen them everywhere but there. LOL This is fun....waiting on the next challenge
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. Nice! Congrats on the lifer!! ?
    1 point
  30. I think that is what he is saying...
    1 point
  31. Structure is also very informative - Spizella sparrows are small, slender sparrows with small bills. On the other hand, Melospiza sparrows are larger and chunkier with longer tails and larger bills. Notice how in the 1st picture the bird has its long tail hoisted high. This is shape and posture is typical of Melospiza and is very wrong for Spizella.
    1 point
  32. That is actually a Swamp Sparrow.
    1 point
  33. From a plumage standpoint, this appears to be a pure Black-capped. Note the bulky appearance, extensive white cheek patch, and strongly white-edged wing coverts and primaries that contrast greatly with the black tertials.
    1 point
  34. Both are indeed Bonaparte's. Also note the black bill.
    1 point
  35. Screechy's really giving you the stink eye in that first shot Nice find!
    1 point
  36. Idaho is special I guess. We don't have Mockingbirds here either ?
    1 point
  37. I'm out of likes like usual. Thanks All. I kind of live on a few acres in the middle of a swamp so I tend to get a lot of waders here eating the crawdads and frogs of which there are many. It floods easy here too but shallow enough that the waders love it and I love watching them. I have 3 Roseate Spoonbills and 2 Little Blue Herons out there now. Nothing like watching a giant pink bird walking along haha. When I first moved to Texas I thought I had gotten too much sun when I saw a large pink bird fly by one afternoon. Little did I know :)
    1 point
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