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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/08/2020 in all areas

  1. 10 points
  2. 10 points
  3. Looks like a male Snowy Owl in a blizzard to me.
    7 points
  4. Guesses 1 and 2 were Willet. Guess number three was also Willet. ?
    5 points
  5. Seen this afternoon circling with 3 other hawks outside DeSoto NWR, southwest of Missouri Valley, Iowa. Didn't notice if the other 3 were the same as I concentrated on this bird--the closest one. Whatever it is, it's definitely unlike any other hawk I've ever seen here in the midwest. The last image is the closest I have to a topside shot. All my other pics are font or underside as it circled and got blown farther away.
    5 points
  6. Or, "How would we know? If you find some, would you post their contact info for the rest of us?"
    4 points
  7. Both are indeed adult Horned Grebes. Breeding Eared Grebes would have spread-out golden feathers on the head, a thinner black neck, and a middle-peaked head. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Horned_Grebe/species-compare/65058061
    3 points
  8. We have a crow family in our yard. Every time I try to take their pic, they scatter. They are very skittish. I will keep stalking them...
    3 points
  9. Calliope Hummingbird.
    3 points
  10. William, I would have thought with all this social distancing there would be some degree of privacy!! William, I still have a feeling we are being watched!
    3 points
  11. White-eyed Vireo by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    3 points
  12. Thanks a lot! Never expected to get a lifer like that in the yard haha. Put it on eBird, I'll see what my reviewer says bout it. https://ebird.org/checklist/S66793098 But it couldn't really be a whole lot else!
    2 points
  13. This thread is quite terrific. I am a bird parent but overy new to birding as an active engagement.These really help me find new readings to prepare. I have been on and off reading The Birder's Handbook- which a friend had suggested to be good for a novice like me. Maybe some of you might find it useful too.
    2 points
  14. I have never seen one before but I can not think of what else it could be. When I post this birders are going to seek out this bird so I want to double check. Today in Chicago: DSC02971r American Bittern by Mark Ross, on Flickr DSC02962r American Bittern by Mark Ross, on Flickr Thanks
    2 points
  15. Wild guess number one: Willet?
    2 points
  16. The first bird looks good for a Mexican Duck x Mallard. Overall similar to a male Mexi but there is too much white in the tail and undertail coverts. The last bird in your second set looks fine for a female Mallard.
    2 points
  17. Looks like a female Black Headed Grosbeak. Good bird and a sure sign of spring.
    2 points
  18. I know its at a feeder but still
    2 points
  19. ? Vermilion Flycatcher - a bucket list bird for me!
    2 points
  20. "See ya guys later!"
    2 points
  21. Cedar Waxwing by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    2 points
  22. 2 points
  23. Crested Caracara by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  24. Yellow Warbler a couple days ago
    1 point
  25. Curved bill yellow belly looks good for Hooded Oriole female
    1 point
  26. I think this looks best for a Song Sparrow. A Fox Sparrow in Delaware would show a significant amount of red, while I do not see any on this individual.
    1 point
  27. No, his eyes just disappeared. Miraculous stunts that Hoodini does.
    1 point
  28. ...with its eyes closed?
    1 point
  29. Here are two pages that might be helpful: https://www.birdzilla.com/bird-identification/id-skill-development/bird-families/waterfowl-identification/duck-identification/identification-of-diving-ducks/comparison-of-greater-and-lesser-scaup.html https://www.thespruce.com/greater-scaup-or-lesser-scaup-387345
    1 point
  30. Lesser is correct. Note the tall, back-peaked head, small nail on a small bill, and clean white flanks.
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. I’d say by the extent of green on the back that it is very likely Allen’s, but can’t be 100% certain, especially since you are an hour west of LA (not strictly coastal) and we are near the peak of Rufous Hummer migration right now. So yeah I’d lean heavily toward Allen’s but a spread tail shot would be definitive
    1 point
  34. Everyone who is interested in birds and cares enough to test their ID skills and wonder about the birds they see is a real birder, no matter if the can tell the difference between a song sparrow and a gold finch or not.
    1 point
  35. Congrats! Heck, close to 15% of my lifers came in the back yards of my last two homes, and that doesn't count the historic / incidental / 01 Jan 1900 birds from other homes. Like your Willet, flyovers are one of the keys to getting backyard lifers and a high yard count.
    1 point
  36. Rusty Blackbird! 8th lifer for April...
    1 point
  37. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher! 7th lifer for April...
    1 point
  38. ew, hate this flavor.
    1 point
  39. I got two lifers today! Grasshopper Sparrow and GOLDEN-CHEEKED WARBLER!!!! Unfortunately The Golden-cheeked Warbler flew over over our fence onto the neighbor yard, and disappeared, before I could get a photo!!
    1 point
  40. Got another Lifer today, a Swamp Sparrow!
    1 point
  41. This is an adult Cooper's Hawk. Note the very bulky overall, relatively large, blocky head with a light nape creating a capped appearance (Sharp-shinned would have a dark nape on a rounded head creating a hooded appearance), eyes close to the front of the head, and thick legs.
    1 point
  42. This is actually a Chipping Sparrow. Field Sparrows would have a rusty (not blackish) eyeline and Swamp Sparrows would have more extensive rust-color on the wings. Both Field and Swamps Sparrows lack the distinctive dark lores of a Chipping Sparrow.
    1 point
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