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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/13/2020 in all areas

  1. And thanks to all who confirmed the ID. I hope the ID of Golden Eagle doesn't change with this flight shot.
    8 points
  2. Kevin I wouldn't be jealous if I were you. I just enjoyed viewing your collection of birds linked to. You have been blessed with so many! I'll share this one with you since it is on your list πŸ™‚ Aplomado Falcon by MedicineMan4040, on Flickr
    5 points
  3. The first one looks like a Green Heron. In the 2nd photo you can see the reddish neck color.
    2 points
  4. Warbling Vireo. The head is not dark enough and eyering not white enough for a Blue-headed.
    2 points
  5. The primary projection is actually very long (almost as long as its undertail coverts). I think it's fine for an Eastern Wood-Pewee.
    2 points
  6. 2 points
  7. 1. Eastern Willet 2. Least Terns 3. Common Tern (dark body and reddish bill/legs)
    2 points
  8. John Doe, Jane Doe, Bird Doe?
    2 points
  9. It’s funny, I’ve heard countless stories of really solid birds being found it Walmart retention ponds and marshes. Always keep an eye out.
    2 points
  10. ... but I must ask, what is a DOE other than a four legged critter which this obviously never was? πŸ€”
    2 points
  11. These actually aren't peeps, these are Spotted Sandpipers. Note the large wing stripe. Peeps are usually known as the small members of the genus calidris: Western, Semipalmated, Least, White-rumped, and Baird's Sandpipers. Spotted are members of the genus actitis.
    2 points
  12. Yes, as long as you are confident in the ID. I like to include an audio recording in my checklists every once in a while to show the reviewers and other eBirders that I do know my bird sounds....at least most of the time...πŸ˜„ It's easier to trust eBirders who include photos and audio.
    2 points
  13. According to Sibley, juvenile Turkey Vultures have grayish heads.
    1 point
  14. First is definitely Savannah Sparrow, and I believe you are correct with the second Id.
    1 point
  15. That could well be. I might also suggest the eBird entry of "shorebird, sp." That entry really should be on every eBird filter.
    1 point
  16. Green Heron, Greater Yellowlegs (the extensive barring on the sides of this adult yellowlegs enables us to rule out Lesser)
    1 point
  17. The tip of the longest primary is indicated here.
    1 point
  18. I think it's the original use of uppercase that has some of us thinking you meant an abbreviation or acronym.
    1 point
  19. Yes and no. In a sea of concrete and strip malls, there is little other available suitable habitat. I know of many excellent examples of retentions ponds producing quite good birding in such areas of otherwise little in the way of interesting birds. This is particularly true in some metro areas in Florida.
    1 point
  20. While the chance of needing bill color/pattern to ID a Great Blue Heron is slight, it is not zero. As example, Great Blue Heron when at rest often holds its neck folded and it's head sitting on its shoulders. From various viewpoints, this can create an appearance of its head that is surprisingly similar to that of adult Yellow-crowned Night-Heron. If the bird is not close, this appearance can be further exacerbated by the loss of definition and uncertainty of what color is on what part. I would provide examples at this time, but eBird seems to be having problems right now displaying individual photos. Additionally, as Charlie wrote, it's an excellent habit to inculcate in one's everyday birding.
    1 point
  21. John Doe- Bird Doe, no experience kind of describe my experience well too πŸ™‚
    1 point
  22. Drab Yellow Warbler.
    1 point
  23. Retention ponds are highly underappreciated, esp. the larger ones associated with 'Big Box' retailers, strip malls, industries and industrial parks, etc. Lots of waders, blackbirds, and other marshy denizens. I've notched four or five lifers in them.
    1 point
  24. Ditto. No comprendo 'DOE'.
    1 point
  25. It’s a rare Walmart Ibis, found exclusively in low quality ecosystems formed by Walmart parking lots.
    1 point
  26. Nice photo! I am jealous, I would love to get to see one!
    1 point
  27. Agree with Lesser Yellowlegs
    1 point
  28. First bird is just too orange for Orchard, while the second is just too yellow for Baltimore. It's often that simple.
    1 point
  29. 1-2 Baltimore Oriole. 3-4 Orchard Oriole.
    1 point
  30. 252. Canada Jay 253. American White Pelican 254. Cedar Waxwing
    1 point
  31. 248. Common Raven 249. Canyon Towhee 250. Mountain Bluebird
    1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. The one most likely to be a Long-billed is the middle bird in the first photo, as it has more extensively orange underparts. However, all are Short-billed and all -- or virtually all, perhaps -- are adults of the eastern subspecies, nominate griseus. Adult Long-billeds are virtually entirely orange below: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/27352911#_ga=2.146315764.1717137327.1596644377-1184313056.1549327880 While some Long-billeds will have begun their prebasic molt by now, most should still be mostly in alternate plumage. Also beware that the central-continent subspecies of Short-billed (hendersoni) is a not-rare migrant on the east coast, particularly in fall. It looks much more Long-billed-like than do the other two subspecies (eastern griseus and western caurinus). For those that care to get into minutiae of dowitcher ID: http://www.surfbirds.com/ID Articles/dowitchers1005/dowitchers.html
    1 point
  34. Immature Green Heron this morning.
    1 point
  35. Black Tern, been trying to get a pic of these guys for years,Its still not a great shot but its my first.
    1 point
  36. White-breasted Nuthatch and Northern Waterthrush
    1 point
  37. Worlds Ugliest Seaside Sparrow
    1 point
  38. I found a Lest Flycatcher! The reasons to be excited about it: 1 I correctly identified a Empidonax Flycatcher. 2 Lifer! 3 Yardbird! 4 Rarity!
    1 point
  39. Spruce Grouse. I have seen them before (maybe when I was 10) but this was the first time I could report one to eBird! So friendly
    1 point
  40. Black Skimmer at Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve yesterday.
    1 point
  41. Tonight is the first time the juvenile Great Horned Owls came to the yard before dark. It gave a chance to get some better pics of them playing.
    1 point
  42. Terns High Island TX 7-20 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  43. Get outa' here! Or I pierce ya!
    1 point
  44. He had to jump to peak over the branch so he could study me better!
    1 point
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