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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/07/2020 in all areas

  1. This is actually a scruffy-looking Vermillion Flycatcher.
    4 points
  2. Who knew that Golden-crowned Sparrows only sing in the key of F# Major!? Though in the recording Colton linked the bird switches key centers, modulating between F# Major and Ab Major! What a brilliant theorist! Who says the next Coltrane can't be a bird? Next thing you know you'll walk outside and hear Giant Steps being whistled from a bush.
    3 points
  3. Seen this afternoon south of Council Bluffs, IA. I believe this is an immature Northern Harrier, likely a first year bird. Can eye color (or any other feature) help determine if it's a young male or female?
    3 points
  4. Your photo is beautiful! https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Harrier/id According to that website *Juvenile males have pale greenish-yellow eyes, while juvenile females have dark chocolate brown eyes. The eye color of both sexes changes gradually to lemon yellow by the time they reach adulthood. On this website https://hawkwatch.org/blog/item/864-eye-color-in-raptors fig #4 shows changes to female eye color. My guess would be 1st year male but hopefully someone else with more experience can comment if any adult feathering is present in you photo.
    3 points
  5. From yesterday. Photographic lifer Blue-headed Vireo!!!!
    2 points
  6. I'll take your word. Everything after 0:30 sounded like random notes to me; the piano less so than the ... sax? I couldn't find anything like a melody to get a mental grip on. I don't expect to be able to tell where a piece is going, but I couldn't tell where this one had been. I don't think I know how to tell a key change; indeed, attempting to grasp the concept of a key frustrated the bejeezus out of me (still does). My previous comment wasn't so much about any individual piece as my failure to understand the terminology y'all were using, even when I was trying to research it. I was getting hung up trying to understand what people were talking about without realizing I didn't actively enjoy anything I was hearing. It would be like getting wrapped up trying to identify patagials or coverts or lores and then realizing you didn't really care much about birds in the first place, that you were forcing yourself because everyone said birding was something to do while isolating.
    2 points
  7. Giant Steps: One of the most famous and influential Jazz pieces. It is know for its rapid changes in key. When @Benjamin is talking about is you cna har in the recording that the song changes key signature. Also that recording is half a mile away from where I live. I've met that guy before.
    2 points
  8. A bird's bill length does not much change over a bird's adult life. That is not to say that it does not grow- it certainly does, as it is made of keratin. However, through the use of the bill and scraping on hard surfaces the length is kept in check. As to the illustrations within Sibley, as with any illustration they should be treated more as a guide than an exact tool to directly compare to real birds. As I've said in a previous post, you're not seeing what the bird really looks like, but instead an artist's impression of what that bird looks like. Now I find Sibley's illustrations particularly compelling, and I feel that they do a good job capturing the essence of that species, but they are not perfect. In regards to the Western Sandpiper illustration though, I think the goal is to show the diversity in bill length among individuals of that species. The nonbreeding bird is certainly on the short end of the spectrum, while the breeding is on the longer end. And you're right, there is overlap between the bill length of Semipalmated Sandpiper and Western in the illustrations, but that's true in real life too! That's exactly why in the field we should never rely solely on a single field mark, but instead a multitude.
    2 points
  9. I would like to know what others think this is: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/259418911
    2 points
  10. Bird will be changed to a Sharpie. The reviewer had been told by another reviewer for a different county it was a Coopers, so he left it as such after the first flagging. He decided if it was flagged again, as Tony did, he would change it.
    2 points
  11. I watched a flock of them taking advantage of yesterday afternoon's winds and were soaring around a farmer's field. Seems weird to see gulls flying around rural areas here in the midwest. Seen just south of Council Bluffs, IA. What kind of gull was this? BTW, it did in fact catch that bug.
    2 points
  12. Where is Ramona Grasslands? Helpful to know location
    2 points
  13. All are California Gulls. Adult Herring Gulls have a pale golden iris. The dark iris visible on the center bird in the photo confirms it is California, as does the slightly darker gray on the back and wings (on Herring Gull the gray would be noticeably paler than California). For the bird on the right in the second photo, it is also a California Gull. A Mew Gull would have a smaller plainer bill, less white in the primary tips, and different structure with longer primary projection. What you are observing is intraspecific variation, that is, the variation between individuals of the same species. Which as you can see can be pretty significant with gulls. For example, males average larger and larger-billed than females, etc.
    2 points
  14. This thrush is a Hermit. Notice the reddish tail and the dark spots with the lack of a buffy wash. Quite a well defined supraloral for Hermit, I must say!
    2 points
  15. 1. Swainson's 2. Yellow-rumped Warbler?
    2 points
  16. 1-3 is indeed a Chipping Sparrow, but 4 is a Ruby-crowned Kinglet. All vireos have thick blue feet.
    2 points
  17. Well, with the complete (just barely) eye ring, the complete breast band, white throat, the large bill and the long under-tail coverts, it looks good for a Connecticut. Awesome find!
    1 point
  18. I like the Brown Creeper’s song because it sounds like the first few notes of my high school’s fight song!
    1 point
  19. Immature Purple Galluinule Anahauc NWR by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  20. Once you get into October that far north, the default warbler is Yellow-rumped. https://ebird.org/barchart?r=US-MN&yr=all&m=
    1 point
  21. Your bird lacks the pale base to the mandible that Red Phalarope shows. Although Red's pale base can be pretty minimal, if it were present on your bird, your pix would show it, given how close the bird is. You can also see in the linked photo the thicker bill of Red.
    1 point
  22. I posted a decent photo of a Rose-breasted Grosbeak last week. I see those birds in the spring and fall, although mostly in the fall. It's been one of those birds that I've had trouble getting any kind of decent photo of, so I was happy to get the shot I posted. Then a few days later I saw this male low in a tree. Initially it was partially obscured in the branches, but I was able to slowly move where I found a clear window. The bird was very cooperative and allowed me to take about a dozen photos of him. Obviously a big improvement over my first post, I was super pleased to get these shots. Rose-breasted Grosbeak by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr Rose-breasted Grosbeak by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  23. Yes, 3 Cackling, 1 Canada, and 4 Redheads.
    1 point
  24. I agree with akandula.
    1 point
  25. The thick white eye-crescents make this a Franklin’s Gull. They’re currently migrating through you area to get to their wintering grounds in South America.
    1 point
  26. Looks like a Chipping Sparrow with the dark eyeline/lores and small pink bill.
    1 point
  27. Black-throated Blue Warbler has a white side patch and in tree cover appears mostly dark.
    1 point
  28. Yes, a young female https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/156116601#_ga=2.206683664.2057399774.1602049265-1712289724.1545602938
    1 point
  29. 333. Prothonotary Warbler 334. Hooded Warbler 335. Kentucky Warbler 336. Prairie Warbler
    1 point
  30. Yes thanks for fixing it & sorry for screwing up the order.
    1 point
  31. I can email the reviewer for Chittenden county, and get his take on it.
    1 point
  32. Same, Red-Necked has more patterned wings than Red.
    1 point
  33. Sorry, Cheyenne, Wyoming late afternoon.
    1 point
  34. My opinion is that it is a Sharp-shinned Hawk...based on its ''bug-eyed'' look and the wings appear to be ''pushed forward''. ?
    1 point
  35. That's some pretty heavy streaking for a Coop.
    1 point
  36. Gambel’s WCSP and Myrtle Yellow-rumpled.
    1 point
  37. Yellow-rumped Warbler. Nice shot!
    1 point
  38. Yellow-throated Vireo by hbvol50, on Flickr
    1 point
  39. Streaking extending up onto the throat of a warbler with tail spots = Cape May
    1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. You are welcome! I started an ''on-going'' list at the start of this thread so it was no problem. Thank you for fixing the both lists. ?
    1 point
  42. Probably a juvenile Thayer's Gull, although more pix of different angles would be useful in nailing down the ID. Except for the smallest females, Herring Gull should have a more substantial bill and ought to show at least some pale to the base of the bill by now. If we could see the underside of the far wing tip, we'd have much more certainty as to which species it is referable.
    1 point
  43. Wing pattern -- an incredibly critical ID feature in waterfowl Female Gadwall Male Gadwall
    1 point
  44. I think the other two landing ducks are green-winged teals. Gadwall, correct me if I’m wrong, don’t have green supercillum
    1 point
  45. All the ducks in the air are Blue-winged Teals.
    1 point
  46. 1 point
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