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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/01/2020 in all areas

  1. In twenty years I have never seen a hawk in my neighbourhood (urban with small lots) but came home today to find this on my deck. About eight feet away - managed to open the patio door but still shooting through a screen so not the best.
    8 points
  2. These are both slightly cropped but other than that they are strait from the camera.
    2 points
  3. Well, I tried....It's super dark, cloudy, and windy. Not the best photography weather. Female Eastern Bluebird from today.
    2 points
  4. That's why I suspected hybrids. According to my sibley field guide, this is just a plumage variation.
    2 points
  5. Yep, people have bred them to be bigger.
    2 points
  6. 2 points
  7. Wired to see a one and a half legged turkey! From google: "The average lifespan of a wild turkey is 3-5 years, and the oldest known wild turkey lived to be at least 13 years old."
    2 points
  8. Here are some from today: I'm trying to get together some more photos for my annual bird calendar. Are any of these interesting enough to put in a calendar?
    2 points
  9. I have absolutely no idea how this turkey has survived this long. We seem to have a year round resident flock of turkeys, that roam the nearby woods and fields, and roost in the winter behind my house. This is at least the fourth year in a row that I have seen this turkey, identified by the fact that he is a tom with his bad leg on the right side. He has one bad leg, so he balls up his foot and walks/hobbles around really using only one leg. This year, it seems that he has had offspring, as he has been traveling with some young ones and a few females. We get to watch the males display in our neighbors driveway every year, and this guy has always been in the background. He is a survivor though, as we had a den of foxes in the neighborhood this year, (with adorable kits), as well as a bear, and undoubtedly coyotes. I do realize that it is possible that there may have been several turkeys with the same bad leg every year, but I like to think that it is the same one. And some of his curious youngsters...
    1 point
  10. 1 point
  11. Seen last week in NW Missouri. Is this a Wilson's Snipe?
    1 point
  12. For those that aren't aware of it, House Finches can also come in yellow or orange.
    1 point
  13. These look good for cackling
    1 point
  14. There is a Mark Forum As Read button at the top right. It's beside the Sort By menu under the big blue Start New Topic button....at least on PC...
    1 point
  15. It looks like the new forum doesn't allow BBCode anymore. ☹️ Here is one way you can embed a photo from Flickr: 1. Get the BBCode from Flickr and copy it into the comment box. This is the BBCode for my Swainson's Thrush photo: [url=https://flic.kr/p/2jFBviF][img]https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50331385213_67a00a30d2_k.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/2jFBviF]Swainson's Thrush[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/birdnuts/]The Bird Nuts[/url], on Flickr 2. Copy the portion in between the img tags (in bold letters above). 3. Click the Other Media button at the bottom right of the comment box, select Insert Image From URL, then paste the URL in there. From there you can double click on the photo to resize it and add a link, etc. Like so:
    1 point
  16. Except for the rightmost bird which we can only see the rear of in the first photo, all of these are Dunlin
    1 point
  17. Thanks for the replies. This bird was just hanging out in the middle of all the beach crowds. I just googled, and found this site to report it. https://www.fws.gov/northeast/pipingplover/report_bands.html So I will do that next.
    1 point
  18. Possibly not on topic here, but Entropy has had a series of bird-related poems, stories, and essays for a few years. The "news" is that they published a poem of mine, "Rhapsody", a few days ago.
    1 point
  19. Yes, with that heavily striped head, barred flanks, and white stripes down the back.
    1 point
  20. I’m in Indianapolis, IN and this owl was hanging around on my patio furniture last night. He stuck around for about 30 minutes eating a songbird. Is this a great horned or a long-eared? I’m leaning toward long-eared based on the tall face disks.
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. Yes, I'm on Android at the moment. I haven't tried the PC yet.
    1 point
  23. goose in photo 1 looks like a snow photo 2 looks like a hybrid but the angle that the bill is held could be causing it to look shorter
    1 point
  24. One hell of an irruption this year. Got my lifer just last week! If finches continue at the rate they're going, we're in for a real treat with Crossbills, Evening Grosbeaks, and hopefully more.
    1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. Looks more like a common loon to me with the neck pattern, but I'm no expert.
    1 point
  27. I think it's a lesser, more peaked head
    1 point
  28. May I offer you an acorn in these trying times?
    1 point
  29. You should have banned Band-tailed Pigeon. They are everywhere here
    1 point
  30. Ughh Why does everyone have to copy the ugly new FB layout.can no one can be unique anymore?
    1 point
  31. And Your Highness is worth every penny you get paid. 😭
    1 point
  32. 1-2 - Gadwall -- you can easily see the distinctive upper-side wing pattern of the species on a couple birds in #1 and many in #2; American Wigeon has a large white patch on the LEADING edge of the wing, not the trailing edge and that patch is WAY bigger than Gadwall's white speculum patch 3 - Presumably more Gadwall, with the white bellies on most; the left-most bird is probably a Green-winged Teal (narrow white patch on underside of wing with dark areas fore and aft of white patch being of similar darkness, and overall smaller size); the bottom-right two of the middle birds may be an American Wigeon pair 4 - more Gadwall 5 - Gadwalls, with other stuff; in the front clump, there are five Northern Pintails led by a male (pink underlines in crop provided); the black underline in that clump is a Blue-winged Teal; at the back end, the bottom bird is another Blue-winged Teal, while the bird right above it is another Northern Pintail; the top-left bird might be another teal of some sort 6 - Gadwall, Northern Pintail, and one Blue-winged Teal (it's the one with big blue wing patches in the top middle, just below the top-most bird, which is a Northern Pintail) 7 - mostly Gadwall, but with at least a few American Wigeon; the middle bird might be a Northern Pintail (it's wings look long and narrow, but...) 8 - Wood Duck
    1 point
  33. Looks like an upgrade. There are some subtle changes to the interface. Somebody test and see if there's still a limit on 'Likes' and if the timeout on editing has changed.
    1 point
  34. That's " who cooks for y'all ". Northeastern birds sound like " who cooks for youse guys "; Canadian ones " who cooks for you, eh? "; Midwestern ones " who cooks, you betcha "
    1 point
  35. @Candydez12 The Gray Jay has been officially renamed to Canada Jay. Here's one I took a photo of in Vermont at Moose Bog.
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel
    1 point
  38. Central Florida. We think they are baby cardinals, as Dad, very red, came to the nest. And we have a pair, male and female.
    1 point
  39. May 7th. Wilson’s Phalarope. Female in foreground. Around Morse, SK.
    1 point
  40. Keeping with MerMaeve's Crossbill theme, here are some White-winged Crossbills. Photographed in Yoho National Park, AB on 8/25/18. Male: Female: And a picture with both:
    1 point
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