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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/05/2020 in all areas

  1. Red Tailed Hawk, Bonelli Regional Park, San Dimas CA today
    6 points
  2. From yesterday. In a roundabout way this is a photo of me.
    3 points
  3. 3 points
  4. It's always nice to see a first county and a 12th state record (that I know of) STREAK-BACKED ORIOLE!
    2 points
  5. Thanks. ? It was really just a lucky picture. The background is all water, no sky. No tweaking of the picture. I don't have that level of expertise.
    2 points
  6. Wood Stork, possibly, but these are still gannets.
    2 points
  7. I think we are being watched!
    2 points
  8. Rufous hummingbird who was a little cold and friendly after the rain.
    1 point
  9. Welcome to WhatBird! I'd like to invite you to read this post for some suggestions as to how to get the best ID. In your case "tree-clinger" was a good hint!
    1 point
  10. Chinook arch over the mountains from where I bird in the morning from Monday. Brought in very warm weather that we actually recorded our hottest November temperature ever at 23C in Calgary. This whole week as been in the double digits and has melted away all the snow and made the ponds ice free again. Making a lot of ducks and other things stay longer than usual all over the city. A nice 40c difference from the week before! However, we’re going back into the deep freeze after Friday ?
    1 point
  11. This was taken today just east of Toronto. I believe that I have a Yellow Legs on the left, and a Dunlin on the right. I'm curious about the bird in the middle which I think is an immature Hudsonian Godwit. Would appreciate confirmation. Second picture is same bird.
    1 point
  12. For one thing I'm not familiar with Grosbeak's size, secondly the photo makes it hard to tell how big it is.
    1 point
  13. Love this thread, @Candydez12! Harris's Sparrow
    1 point
  14. This one was solo in a small cattle tank/pond, continually diving under water for periods of about 20 seconds each around dusk, floating around in early morning. Sorry for the sub-par photos / videos...can't wait for my new tripod to get here with a ball head! IMG_1370_Trim (2).mp4
    1 point
  15. Extensive yellow on bill, combined with other features, makes the ID a snap.
    1 point
  16. I'll try to get some better pics after work today and re-post, assuming he is still around...
    1 point
  17. B, wow you all are good!! Thank you!!! It is a white breasted nuthatch!! I listened to the recorded song of the nuthatch and it matched perfectly to the bird I just saw!
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. Pacific (lutescens) Orange-crowned Warbler
    1 point
  20. Dude, the first picture ROCKS. Did the sky reflect so perfectly you can't tell where it stops and water begins, or did you have to tweak it a bit on the back end?
    1 point
  21. Gannet's are surprisingly common in Florida. When I visit family there, I often get them through binoculars from the beach, along the Gulf Coast.
    1 point
  22. LeConte's Thrasher. This guy looks like he has been around for a while with that worn-beak.
    1 point
  23. I guess the cactus juice don't agree with Alfredo. Hey, did you ever see that Peckinpah movie? You know the one. It was called 'Bring me the Head of Alfredo Garcia'! \ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bring_Me_the_Head_of_Alfredo_Garcia
    1 point
  24. I agree with your ID’s.
    1 point
  25. Yes, Northern Gannets. Huge bill is the giveaway, no other bird (I believe) is in the area with that size bill mixed with black and white feathers. Unless of course the masked booby ? (they’re not though)
    1 point
  26. just a bit more to the left....
    1 point
  27. Osprey taken 10-12-2020 at Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve in Van Nuys, CA.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. You can build a platform feeder like this one with a square piece of plywood, small stove pipe and piece of conduit from Lowe’s for about 25 bucks. This is squirrel and raccoon proof as well. Been using it about 8 years. Need to replace plywood soon. We get every kind of bird you can imagine on it.
    1 point
  30. Large body size, chunky appearance, bigger stubby bill, gray all over except with a yellow-orange wash on back of head
    1 point
  31. I am not saying it is not a Pine Grosbeak, but how are we eliminating American Goldfinch?
    1 point
  32. I think it's an Eastern Phoebe. The colors in the entire photo are very saturated.
    1 point
  33. Blackpoll Warbler (greenish color, streaked back, dark eyeline, orange toes).
    1 point
  34. Yes, they are identifiable. Can I identify them? Mostly, no. But Tony probably can. I can tell you that the second photo looks like a Franklin’s Gull to me.
    1 point
  35. I would have to have used one of those railway cars that carries spacecraft to the launchpad. Unintentionally making erroneous statements is my forte. lol
    1 point
  36. This sparrow's name is due to language problems. Whether ecologists borrowed two words that were in use for wetlands to name two very different sorts of wetlands or whether lazy English users don't understand the difference between "swamp" and "marsh," I do not know. Melospiza georgiana OUGHT to be called "Marsh Sparrow," as it breeds primarily in marshes. Swamps are wetlands dominated by woody plants, while marshes are wetlands dominated by non-woody plants, such as cattails, a favored breeding haunt of Swamp Sparrows. Outside of breeding season, Swamp Sparrows occur in a wide variety of low-stature habitats.
    1 point
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