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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/17/2020 in all areas

  1. A flock of American Pipits stopped of in the field across the yard today!
    3 points
  2. I recall seeing the title once but never opened it. Back In The Day, calling something a 'bomb' meant it wasn't any good - "That movie was a real bomb." or "The idea bombed." I -assumed- it meant bad photos, and I generate enough of my own.
    3 points
  3. Did you double check the time and location? Sometimes places in other states have identical names or something.
    3 points
  4. I finally saw one of my nemesis birds this morning... a northern shrike! Been walking around this one area near my house at sunrise for the last 3 weeks trying to find one (and to complete the weekly data bars). It was chasing/being chased by a magpie and flew about 20ft in front of me and up and away. Now I have to continue walking around until I get a photo 😪
    3 points
  5. Looks good to me. Very dark overall. Solid dark brown feathers with lighter edges. Dull greenish bill separates from female mallard and suggests that this is a female ABDU.
    2 points
  6. The bird on the left in the last pic is actually a White-crowned Sparrow.
    2 points
  7. hey I uploaded a pic of a mute swan and it's still unconfirmed
    2 points
  8. 2 points
  9. There is a Western Meadowlark sitting on this deers' head
    2 points
  10. Thought I might get shutout of county lifers this year, till I got the message this guy showed up.
    2 points
  11. A squirrel photobombed my photo of a squirrel
    2 points
  12. That's a good clue, but unless you have plenty of experience with both, it can be hard to compare size in the field.
    1 point
  13. Half making fun here, half not, but are you even trying to ID these on your own? 😂
    1 point
  14. Question: If we reach the end of the warbler list, can we keep going and post better and better photos of each species? 🤣
    1 point
  15. The forum went through a crash and now the old topics that this would fit better in are gone and nobody seems to be interested enough to reinstate them. I think your question might go better in the other thread simply because it's technically "ID help" even though it's not a particular bird you're wanting ID'd.
    1 point
  16. If you have the sun behind you, with it lower in the sky, the bird would be in good light. Then you just need to find birds. A classic trick is to have your shadow pointing directly at the bird.
    1 point
  17. Thanks for the correction. I am officially retiring from sparrow Id as of now, lol.
    1 point
  18. I'm 18, I should qualify according to what Melierax said. I thought I was just slightly too old....
    1 point
  19. I think the rule is 12-18, at least. I think the pre-crash Whatbird's Young Birders had some people up to 20, but not sure. Welcome to the club! 😂
    1 point
  20. Got one nemesis bird this morning, as well as 2 and a half other lifers! Gadwall was the nemesis, also had a Tundra Swan and Eurasian Wigeon. Greater Scaup was the half, as I have seen them before, but I hadn’t used eBird yet.
    1 point
  21. Your Ids are correct. 1-2 Great Egret 3-4 Snowy Egret.
    1 point
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. This was tossed around about a year ago as a redtail variaition (or not).
    1 point
  25. Agreed - that big honkin' beak.
    1 point
  26. 1 point
  27. Hear, hear. However, I would urge in coastal states for specific locations. That is because in Florida and other areas hosting wintering dowitchers, Short-billed are nearly always found along saltwater and Long-billeds are nearly always found along freshwater. There is quite a bit of slop, but, in winter, it's a good first dichotomy to address in dealing with dowitcher ID.
    1 point
  28. While true in some respects, it is not in others. In my experience, Chippings always have at least some dark in the lores, that amount can be insignificant enough to not be detectable in the field. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/268589901#_ga=2.207063251.1948644303.1604284830-1184313056.1549327880 The blackness and distinctness of the post-ocular part of the eyeline is more reliable for ID than is the loral part.
    1 point
  29. There is no way to pick the nail out of the extensive black tip to the bill typical of immature male scaup. The nail is not the black area on this bird's bill! Lesser: adult male immature male (note that both photos were taken in January) Greater: adult male immature male I also strongly caution birders about taking identifications as gospel of individual birds that eBirders submit to eBird/Macaulay. I frequently go through Greater Scaup photos (and photos of many other species that are difficult to ID) in that archive and routinely find many mis-identified individuals and even more for which the submitted photo (or photos) are not definitive for ID. I present three interesting photos that I encountered while looking for representative photos for this response. This bird is, in my opinion, certainly a Greater Scaup and I am certain that many birders would call it a female. However, the bill pattern and coloration rules out that determination. Looking carefully at the lower scapulars and the flank feathers reveals a few feathers in each tract that are obviously those of a male, but an immature male that is decidedly behind the curve on achieving adult-like plumage. Most male scaup are quite obviously male scaup in March. This bird may well be a Greater Scaup, but I hope it wasn't ID'ed on the strengths of only the head "color" and the apparent head shape. Due to the photo angle, the shape of the nail is uncertain, at best. Given the water droplets on the head, we can assume that the bird is actively foraging, thus head shape is insufficient to ID with certainty. Of course, head color is NEVER sufficient for ID, given the vagaries of iridescent coloration. This bird, though relatively "clean-sided" and dark-headed, has the nail shape of a Lesser Scaup (see linked photo above). Despite that the photo is one of the highest-ranked photos of "Greater Scaup" in the archive, I suggest that it is not a Greater Scaup.
    1 point
  30. Bewick's has a very long and quite bright supercilium. Here is one version of a relatively insignificant BEWR super and here is another. In the second bird, which is a juvenile (the plumage sports insignificant supers relative to older plumages), this bird's super is still more obvious than that on virtually any House Wren. Bewick's has a virtually unmarked back and scapulars of uniform color, while House has, at least, mottling, usually barring on these feathers. Bewick's has an incomplete eye ring (virtually always), while House as a complete eye ring (virtually always). When House has an incomplete eye ring, or seemingly so, it is broken above the eye. On Bewick's, the eye ring is always broken in front of the eye, even if broken nowhere else.
    1 point
  31. You guys forgot one. Magnolia Warbler.
    1 point
  32. Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Note the thin bill and the very active foraging behavior.
    1 point
  33. Ah so that’s why my National Geographic guide from 2017 has them as different species and EBird has them as one, well its outdated now good thing I have a 2020 Peterson guide on the way😄
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. I counted four photos.
    1 point
  36. I agree! And the third most asked question is, "Which Sparrow?", when it's a female Red-winged Blackbird!
    1 point
  37. The group of ducks that includes Ruddy Duck are called "stifftails" for a reason.
    1 point
  38. Nah, trade offs are completely avoidable! It's finding enough money to make the go away that's usually the problem! And I have really become addicted to the kind of range that comes with a lens I probably won't be able to afford for a DSLR or mirrorless, even used.
    1 point
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