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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/03/2020 in all areas

  1. 3 points
  2. Alright, that's it. I'm sick of west coast gulls!!!
    3 points
  3. Sorry. It's got a dark eye and a red gonys spot; classic Cal Second looks fine for Thayer's; the all-black bill in Dec should rule out Herring, and there are no other good options given the bird's relative petiteness and plumage. Third - Herring Fourth - dark eye, all-black tail = Cal (quit looking at the "ringed" bill) Fifth - Herring If you really want to learn gull ID and don't have Howell's Gulls book, you're missing your best bet. Buy it. Read it. I mean, READ it. Read it, again. Take it with you to someplace like Lucchesi Park (in Petaluma) and spend a day studying the gulls there. Beware, there are many hybrids there.
    3 points
  4. An immature Brown Pelican testing the waters this morning.
    2 points
  5. Keep your eyes open; this is looking like a good irruption year.
    2 points
  6. This is a Cooper's Hawk with the blocky head, small eyes close to the front of the head, obviously graduated tail feathers, and capped (not hooded) appearance.
    2 points
  7. That's what I always do. I know I'll get some unproductive place, but if I can scout it out before, and there's water, you can almost always pull 100 species.
    2 points
  8. Two solitary sandpipers. Wide white eye ring, and dark tipped bill. Lesser yellowlegs would have a dark bill.
    2 points
  9. Go to the upper Texas coast or Louisiana coast in late April. You WILL see that many warblers in one day. And so much more
    2 points
  10. Mag, Blackpoll, Bay-breasted, Cape May, Cape May, Bay-breasted The male Cape May is pretty straightforward. The last bird has a huge patch of bay on the flanks. The Blackpoll has obvious eye arcs, back streaking, and orange toes.
    2 points
  11. Sorry! I think I misunderstood @MichaelLong's request to "delete this one" as meaning delete that post, but perhaps he meant to delete the thread (I didn't realize it was a duplicate). I merged the two threads.
    2 points
  12. Recently I started to feed the squirrels so that they wouldn't compete for food with the birds. I found a funny squirrel feeder, It is a Horse Head feeder of Accoutrements. Watching them go nuts over the feeder was pretty funny. We laughed so hard, and it became an instant hit for the kids. The head is hollow inside, and you can put a variety of nuts and seeds to attract them.
    2 points
  13. Here at work, whenever a user requests we purchase PhotoShop or similar software, we install GIMP first. If they can demonstrate it won't do what they need, then we order PS. We haven't ordered PS in years.
    1 point
  14. Agree with Cooper’s Hawk
    1 point
  15. I think that's a Brewer's.
    1 point
  16. Sparrow in flight.
    1 point
  17. Yes, Coopers Hawk. Nice pics!
    1 point
  18. You’re right, it’s not my fault I got it wrong, it was the angle of the sun and the bird for having too much yellow in its legs! Though don’t know the excuse for the beak...
    1 point
  19. Maybe two different sexes/ages? Or you could just blame it on lighting or saturation ?
    1 point
  20. Great morning! Several species got flagged because of the sheer numbers. https://ebird.org/checklist/S77013054
    1 point
  21. House Finch. They get there colors from the berries that they eat. They can be from orange to a purpely color, just depending on what berries it eats.If it where a purple finch, in the front there would be no brown. Instead it would be white with purpleish red stripes. Also, the wings are all brown on the bird you have taken a picture of. That is a House Finch's wings. In the Purple Finch, it would be a mix of purple and brown and white. And the brown on the wings is a dark brown color. House Finches are light brown. Therefore, it is a House Finch not a Purple Finch.
    1 point
  22. 1 point
  23. 1. Magnolia Warbler 2. Blackpoll Warbler 3. Bay Breasted Warbler 4. Cape May Warbler 5. Another Cape May Warbler 6. Looks like another Bay Breasted Warbler to me
    1 point
  24. All are Solitary Sandpipers. Lesser Yellowlegs have all black beaks. Solitary have low streaking underneath the head. And I am pretty sure yellowlegs have more vibrant yellow legs. Also, they are typically taller then the bird you have taken a picture of. Therefore, all of them are Solitary Sandpipers.
    1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. Lesser Black-backed Gull! Lifer as well!
    1 point
  27. 1 point
  28. Saying some version of "I agree" dose get a little repetitive.
    1 point
  29. Bold brown streaking on the flanks and white wingbars = House Finch.
    1 point
  30. By the way, Cackling is MUCH, MUCH more likely in Asia than is Canada on multiple grounds. Aleutian Cacklers winter in Japan in numbers. Japan also has records accepted in eBird of minima and Richardson's, and there's an accepted eBird record of minima from Korea. While obviously unlikely, a Richardson's making it to China is not out of the question.
    1 point
  31. I always liked this. Northern Pintail flying in CANG formation.
    1 point
  32. Not something I see every day.
    1 point
  33. Photographic lifer, and rarity, Brown Creeper!
    1 point
  34. Common Redpolls are living up to their name at the moment.
    1 point
  35. Always liked the reflections in this one.
    1 point
  36. Do you use the digital zoom on your camera, @Charlie Spencer? If not you may want to give it a try. I don't usually recommend using the digital zoom on point and shoot cameras because I always thought it just digitally cropped the image in the camera where you have less control and poorer results than doing the cropping on the computer in post processing, but that might be ideal for you. The image quality might drop in the digital zoom range but it might also help fill the frame with your subject which might actually help the camera get a better exposure metering. Remember, the more you can fill the screen with your subject, the better the odds of the camera getting the exposure right. You also have to remember that the longer you zoom out, the harder it will be to keep the camera steady and locked on your subject, this is where practice and good technique comes into play. I didn't take a wide angle shot this morning, but here's one from a few days ago that shows the tree and where I was shooting from. I took a few sample shots with and without digital zoom to show how the exposure is more accurate when your subject fills the frame. My subject is right in the middle of the frame, and in the shadows, a challenging shot for any auto or semi auto setting on most cameras because the rest of the tree being in direct sun with the bright sky in the background. This is max optical zoom, notice the better exposure that allows us to see what the subject actually is. This is max digital zoom, 8000mm. While it's not a pretty picture, it is definitely suitable for IDing purposes, if you're IDing trees. Getting closer is one of the simplest things we can do to improve our bird photos, while digital zoom probably isn't the best way to get closer, it might be better than not getting closer. Something to consider if you haven't already tried and dismissed the idea of digital zoom.
    1 point
  37. I thought this one I took last month was really interesting. The backlighting, the hovering hummingbird, the different shades of green in the background...
    1 point
  38. Okay, I've probably posted this one a gazillion times, and it's my profile header too. I have shots that are clearer, more detailed, technically better, but it remains my all-time favorite. It was relatively cloudy that January morning at Phinizy Swamp Nature Park near Augusta, GA. The Great Blue was flying over one of the large ponds when he suddenly pulled hard right and did his best imitation of a diving Gannet. Bill first, wings back, legs behind, like a giant lawn dart. As he stabbed the water, his feet were already coming around to push off the bottom. I got several shots in the series, but this THE one for me. Do us both a favor and zoom in. The spread of the primaries, the water streaming off his legs, the massive fish impaled on his bill, he looks like a cross between a B2 bomber and the avian Angel of Death. It perfectly captures the moment, and everything I love about birding.
    1 point
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