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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/04/2020 in all areas

  1. An immature Brown Pelican testing the waters this morning.
    9 points
  2. Our much, photographed locally, eagle pair. The leucistic male has been around for several years.
    7 points
  3. Late in the day yesterday, my first barred owl
    5 points
  4. An ancient photo from 2014. Haven’t gotten this close to one since
    5 points
  5. It seems like everyone should be happy while vacationing at the beach. I'm not sure why he was so grumpy.
    4 points
  6. If you want to find rare birds for your self, there's a few things you'll need to do. Remember, you're in the Orange County area, so rare birds can show up anywhere, which is a plus. First, You need to get reeky familiar with all of your normal birds, learn all plumages, learn everythings calls and songs. This will first help you, as you can spend more time looking for something out of the ordinary, as if you hear a Townsend's Warbler chip, you wouldn't need to spend tons of time looking for it. It also makes you a better birder in general. Once you are pretty confident with all of your local birds, there are a few things you can do to greatly increase your chances of finding a rarity. First, migration is key, there will be lots of birds moving through the area, and you're more likely to find something interesting. I will note, winter isn't bad in the LA/Orange/San Diego area, I know a lot of birds are still being found, and I found some things when I was down there for 2 days in February. Next, even though rarities get spread out in the LA area, the old saying still holds true, Location, Location, Location! Find parks with lots of trees and habitat, something that stands out from the surrounding neighborhoods. While some lesser rarities often show up in neighborhoods, it's still better to head to parks and places where there is better habitat. And lastly, you want to be in the mindset of finding something interesting. This might seem dumb, but most rare birds are found by people looking for rare birds, and that especially holds true with passerines. If you want to find something, look for it. Intently check every flock of birds that you come by, pish birds in, listen for anything out of the ordinary. I'm sure much more could be added on to this.
    3 points
  7. 3 points
  8. House for sure, The males are not red in the right places, and neither male or females show strong enough supercilliums.
    2 points
  9. All House Finches. Note the plain face on the female, the bold brown streaking on the underside and brown back on the male, and the obviously curved culmens (upper ridges of the beaks).
    2 points
  10. 1. White-crowned Sparrow 2. American Tree Sparrow. 3. House Sparrow 4. Swamp Sparrow 5. White-throated Sparrow. That's a nice group of sparrow there.
    2 points
  11. I wouldn’t worry about the hawks effect on small native animals as the hawk itself is native. Their prey have adaptations to not get eaten, and even when they do it’s beneficial to the ecosystem as a whole. Most of its prey are ‘pest’ animals so without the hawk and other predators keeping their numbers in check, they could seriously overpopulate and negatively effect the environment. Red-tails are adaptive birds and he is probably there as there is ample food sources whether that be mice or squirrels or whatever that often come with human habitation. I don’t feel that removing the bird would solve the issue at all as that would just provide an opportunity for a new predator to occupy the area. Plus, it’s not the birds fault that its habitat has been taken over by development. Don’t think there is much you can do except be cautious with your pets... I have a miniature dachshund and have to be careful to watch out for bobcats when letting her out and great horned owls, but can’t really do much but make sure none are in the yard when she’s out. Perhaps try to limit bird feeders and other sources that attract its prey?
    2 points
  12. You just have to be at the right place at the right time 😎 Usually if you frequent a certain area, you are bound to find something remotely interesting after a while. No guarantees though of course. Sometimes paying attention to the weather can help as birds are often blown of course by tropical storms, or other weather events. Sometimes even heavy snowfall and rain can drive migrating birds down in a ‘fallout’ which can provide some interesting finds.
    2 points
  13. Yes, the Eastern subspecies, which is the subspecies we get most here in the Northeast, has minimal streaking on its breast, so it's a bit easier to ID a Red-tailed here than it is in the west. But most subspecies of Red-tailed have heavier markings across the belly.
    2 points
  14. 2 points
  15. I was more referring to the shape of the head the pic you just posted is a Immature/Juvenile Common Goldeneye
    1 point
  16. Do you have any more photos of the first bird? I’m pretty sure it’s an intergrade, but it could be a gambel’s.
    1 point
  17. I agree with @Aidan B!
    1 point
  18. House House House House
    1 point
  19. Song Sparrow is correct.
    1 point
  20. I'd go with five CATEs, the fourth being the largest tern in the back clump on the left edge (it's obviously larger than the Royals around it and seems to have a mostly blackish crown) and the fifth being the closest tern on the right edge of the back clump. Nine ROYTs in the first clump and, as Connor wrote, most of the back clump are ROYTs.
    1 point
  21. I should add that Rough-legged Hawks also have a belly band, but it is barred or solid, and they have smaller bills among other differences in shape and plumage.
    1 point
  22. The band of streaks across it belly and unmarked breast make this a Red-tailed Hawk.
    1 point
  23. Looks good, unless I’m missing something. The blurry ones in the back look like mostly Royal.
    1 point
  24. Yeah, I know. I have been checking every finch I see.
    1 point
  25. Sparrow in flight.
    1 point
  26. Upload to YouTube, or I think Flickr does video also.
    1 point
  27. White Crowned Sparrow, Mojave Desert rural Yucca Valley Ca.
    1 point
  28. It will be probably forever. You’re best option is to get into Cornell, as students can upload video.
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. The last two photos are of a Bay-breasted. The first bird appears to be a Pine Warbler (thicker bill, different yellow hue, gray flanks).
    1 point
  31. Bad picture, but I don't see dark morph ferrugs often.
    1 point
  32. Wtf these are such good birds you are god
    1 point
  33. White Crowned Sparrow today in Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park, San Dimas CA
    1 point
  34. This reminds me of Mark Rober's Squirrel Obstacle Course.
    1 point
  35. I use Adobe photoshop and Topaz DeNoise to edit photos, and store them on my computers hard drive.
    1 point
  36. This was just a record shot through the windshield, but I rater liked the way the late afternoon winter sun lit the owl and the trees around it.
    1 point
  37. There is no four-letter code of "NOSH," due to the conflict between Northern Shoveler (NSHO) and Northern Shrike (NSHR). All the ducks are scaup. RUDU is much smaller than even Lesser Scaup and wouldn't show so much dark on the head. We're looking down the head of the sleeping bird (from back to front), so profile cannot be determined. I think that they're safely all Lesser.
    1 point
  38. You might look at GIMP or IrfanView, two free image editing applications. Both are actively maintained so they incorporate new image formats. Maybe one of them will open the Sony images. https://www.gimp.org/ https://www.irfanview.com I have the same issue with Panasonic's .RW2 raw format. They will only open in a few applications. The application that came with the camera (SilkyPix) is either too cumbersome for easy use or too advanced for my beginner skills; I haven't worked much with othe applications so I don't have any experience to compare it to. Fortunately, I'm not interested in editing so the limited number of applications that will open the RW2 doesn't affect me.
    1 point
  39. 1 point
  40. I took this photo the last time I went to Florida, but can’t remember if I was trying to get the pelican in front of the sun or if this was just a happy accident.... I like to think it was my immense skill! 😂
    1 point
  41. Great Egret and a Ring-Billed Gull that skewered a catfish
    1 point
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