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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/29/2021 in all areas

  1. This thread is bugging me out!!
    7 points
  2. weird it posted another pic . from a few days ago. couldnt decide which one was better from today GW teal Or rosette spoonbill
    7 points
  3. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/320788361#_ga=2.19 0999018.1925180127.1613408829-1889329117.1595439159
    7 points
  4. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/320 794851
    6 points
  5. It looks like someone is in the dog house. I love when photos capture personality.
    5 points
  6. There is not really anything else these could be other than Spoonbills.
    5 points
  7. I start with my eBird checklist for the day. That shows me what sparrows / birds are expected in the area at that time of year. I check those in Sibley and NatGeo to narrow the list, then use AllAboutBirds if I couldn't reach a conclusion. I also check AAB' history for a species to see how common it is in the area. If I'm still stuck, I come here I prefer printed guides as a first step because looking for one bird exposes me to images and info on the alternatives. AAB's 'Similar Species' feature also does that, in a less detail fashion. But really, it starts with thumbing through
    5 points
  8. I love spiders, they creep me out on occasion, like when you walk face first through their webs and then see them dangling off the peak of your hat a few minutes later, but I still love watching them and seeing the beautiful work they do with their webs. Here's a few of my spider web shots.
    4 points
  9. Bowl and Dollie spider webs my husband and I found this scene in early April last year in one of the few parks that had not been shut down by Covid restriction Duval County, FL. It had rained the night before and was foggy when we arrived creating the perfect conditions to highlight literally thousands of these webs in this forest. The 1st photo below represents just one small section of the forest. The 2nd photo is a close up of one of the webs. I was in awe of this sight and a little creeped out at the same time.
    4 points
  10. Square-legged Camel Cricket
    4 points
  11. Zebra Jumping Spider
    4 points
  12. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/320872671 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/320872901
    4 points
  13. 4 points
  14. Not sure just what this is, so I just call it Orange Dragonfly.
    4 points
  15. Looks like some type of Weevil. Based on its habitat, I'd call that one a Couch Weevil. 😏
    4 points
  16. Spider w/ Bee
    4 points
  17. Whatever the heck this thing is
    4 points
  18. When I see them, they are always like half-a-mile away...
    4 points
  19. Also many kinds of insects are active in the heat of summer when birding tends to be a little slow.
    3 points
  20. Birds with prey.
    3 points
  21. Just adding that the eBird app now lets you explore observations within 1km/other ranges and if you click on a species it pops up an immediate map of the sightings. Much easier than how it works on the website, and gets done almost everything I was hoping for in a map.
    3 points
  22. Careful. Bell’s Sparrow and Sagebrush Sparrow can be very difficult to identify - they used to be considered the same species after all. I agree with Bell’s Sparrow with the overall colorful, contrasting plumage, including a black malar stripe which is noticeably darker than the gray cheek. Since you are in Southern California, you might get both species in winter. So it’s good to pay close attention to these two species.
    3 points
  23. Definitely Sage Thrasher. I doubt they’re that common up there.
    3 points
  24. only seen one once buy got a decent pic
    3 points
  25. Yes, indeed! The robust feet, graduated tail feathers, and long-necked appearance all point to Cooper's.
    3 points
  26. Short, but not bad audio of a Screech-owl last night, with a cameo of a whispering family member. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/320613801
    3 points
  27. 3 points
  28. Since we have a lot of amazing photographers on this site, I thought it might be interesting to share what we shoot with. Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i Lens: EF75-300mm f/4-5.6
    2 points
  29. 2 points
  30. 7 feels like a Kinglet (or vireo) to me. What warbler has that head pattern? That streaking is probably from a weird feather position.
    2 points
  31. Looks like a Red-winged, not Tricolored Blackbird
    2 points
  32. You can also sign up to receive e-mails listing rare sightings in your county, or birds seen that aren't on your county life list. Or any county, which is handy when you're traveling and want to know what's hot in the last day.
    2 points
  33. Indeed. Roseate Spoonbill is, perhaps, the single most distinctive species in the ABA Area.
    2 points
  34. Shape and lack of a long tail fits Owl quite well. Giss suggests Barn, but the barring is an issue
    2 points
  35. I have the same setup as Conners, except I don’t have an extender. I’ve had for maybe 2 months now, and still haven’t exactly figured it all out yet, but I like it. Very fast autofocus. However, I still carry around and use my Coolpix p600 as it can fit in my pocket. It’s the only camera I have on me when I go bird in the mornings, mostly used for record shots of notable species. Though, the p600 is sometimes better for further away birds, so I’ve used it for that as well, but it generally stays in my pocket the whole time. Only bring out my other camera if I’m in the yard, driving
    2 points
  36. Mourning dove P1020427.MP4
    2 points
  37. Millerton Lake is a very pretty area!
    2 points
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