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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/03/2021 in all areas

  1. I don't think anyone views you as the enemy, and I think what you are viewing as "backlash" is just trying say that they have tried there best convince you of the id and that they want this thread to stay friendly, and not turn into an argument/war, so they are done. Don't too feel bad about a few misidentifications, we all have some, and I think you have admitted you were wrong when corrected in the past. A friendly discussion is great, but once it starts to be come an out and out argument it needs to stop. Some times after you've given you reasons for the id you came up with and others don't agree, it's just best to let it go. I've had some like that and I'm sure others have to. Being willing to admit when your wrong and apologizing if need it leaves me with a certain amount of respect for you. Keep studying! You will get better. Also one more thing, if you aren't sure of an id you can always and an "I think" or "wait for a conformation", I do that all the time here. I'm sure that @Aveschapines would have said something, and do a better job but I tried to say what I thought.
    9 points
  2. If your picking tomorrow, then yesterday is today. But if yesterday is today when is tomorrow? And if tomorrow is today that makes today yesterday. I think I had better stop this, it is getting confusing.
    7 points
  3. Female Brown-headed Cowbird.
    7 points
  4. I agree that spirited discussion about tricky IDs (even when some people are sure...) are great. It probably wasn't particularly helpful for people to start saying that you weren't going to change your mind. I agree that I don't think you created any drama, besides some ID drama, which is great. I hope you did mean that you were done with this thread and not leaving the forums. I also don't think it's necessary or helpful for people to announce that they are not going to comment further; just not posting again is fine. It would also be useful for the more established members to remember that newbies don't necessarily know who the experts here are yet, and that insistence is not necessarily always related to correctness 😄 None of these debates should be taken as personal attacks. Not only the original poster but everyone reading along is learning from these discussions. You may be right, and know you're right, but everyone needs to learn for themselves WHY you're right. It doesn't help a less experienced birder to be left feeling that the answer is "because I (expert birder) say so". (And of course we're all wrong once in a while.)
    7 points
  5. Boat-tailed Grackle House Wren Least Sandpiper Red-tailed Hawk Snowy Owl Tree Swallow Vesper Sparrow White-winged Tern
    6 points
  6. Indeed it is.
    6 points
  7. Eastern Wood-Pewee. Besides primary length, Wood-Pewees have a gray back and wings while Willows have greenish-brown back and gray wings.
    6 points
  8. Thank you Aveschapines. I think I overreacted a bit. And I can be a bit too stubborn sometimes.
    5 points
  9. Not a Tennessee - I believe a Blackburnian.
    4 points
  10. 4 points
  11. I have affectionately named this Vermilion Flycatcher Cornelius. I see him every time I walk on a certain path about an hour from where I live and it's worth the drive every time.
    4 points
  12. Chipping Sparrow
    4 points
  13. All Greaters November makes things a bit more straightforward simply on likelihood: Bar Charts - eBird The left bird has an obvious pale base to the bill and both the left and middle birds' wing tips barely reach the tail tip.
    4 points
  14. Looks way to dark for Hoary
    4 points
  15. I think its plumage is worn, so the pale edges on the feathers are faded.
    4 points
  16. Hey guys, it's another birder with a camera. Take cover quick before he can focus on the rest of you.
    4 points
  17. #104 Great Blue Heron
    4 points
  18. A male Red-winged Blackbird still displaying https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/351972641
    3 points
  19. Taken on 7-1-2021 in a residential area in Glenoaks Canyon, Glendale, CA. Is this a Peregrine Falcon?
    3 points
  20. 3 points
  21. I definitely like Greater for the second shot. The bill looks to be about twice the length of the head.
    3 points
  22. It is a young House Sparrow. I wonder if it's melanistic.
    3 points
  23. I'd say Greater yellowlegs. Lots of barring is seen in breeding birds. Bill seems too long for lesser. Would wait for additional confirmation.
    3 points
  24. Hi, and welcome to Whatbird! That's an interesting question. It isn't so much scientific practice as an historic legacy. Let's face it, for centuries the study of birds and the natural world was the province of well-to-do white males. They weren't an enlightened bunch by today's standards. Being males, they concentrated on males, and usually shot first and studied later. Ornithologists are paying more attention to females in the last several years. They're finding some females show unsuspected differences in behavior from males. Check some back issues of Living Bird for findings, for example. But there are practical reasons. In most North American dimorphic species, the males are the flashier ones. For beginners, they're easier to learn than the drabber females. It's also often easier to differentiate between the breeding males of related dimorphic species than between the females; see ducks, for example. Should it be this way? If we were discussing people, I'd say no. But the birds don't know which sex is mentioned first in the field guides or shown first on AllAboutBirds, and don't care either. As to descriptions here at Whatbird, I find most comments are in response to a posted photo. If someone posts a dimorphic male, that's what we talk about. if a photo of a female is offered, we'll describe what we see. I'm going to try dragging @Tony Leukeringinto this one. I'd like to get an academic opinion on the subject.
    3 points
  25. Some species are more prone to bills that grow abnormally. House Finches with odd bills show up here periodically.
    3 points
  26. Dragonfly sp.
    3 points
  27. Brown Pelican today https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/351756641
    3 points
  28. Some recent arths (did I just make up that word)? Northern or Virile Crayfish, Faxonius virilis, or so I was told at iNaturalist (from the same spot as my latest ode photos): Fireweed Borer, Albuna pyramidalis (ID from BugGuide), a clearwing moth that seems to be a wasp mimic: Tiger Beetle sp, maybe a variant of tranquebarica, or not? Eight-spotted Skimmer (*yawn*): What I think a male Common Whitetail is supposed to look like:
    3 points
  29. Blackburnian for me, too.
    2 points
  30. Slate-throated Redstart https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/351981631
    2 points
  31. Actually, from a biological POV, males are the "basic" form in birds. In mammals, the homozygous sex is female. That is, mammals with XX chromosomes (homozygous) are females, while those with XY (heterozygous) are males. Female, then, is the "default" sex. This is reversed in birds, so male is the default sex. From a plumage-description POV, in sexually-dimorphic species, the "duller" sex often requires more-precise and -expansive description to enable distinguishing the duller sex of similar species. Take Red-winged Blackbird (RWBL). Adult males are easily described. There are only three colors, with black accounting for the color of virtually all of the plumage; the other bits are easily described, and those "other bits" enable distinguishing them from the other "black blackbirds" and from the few other species in other families that are all or mostly black. Females, however, are streaked below, and even cursory traipsing through the ID forum illustrates the problems that beginning or less-experienced birders have with streaked birds. In the RWBL example, ruling out confamilial species is both difficult and simple. Difficult because Tricolored Blackbird females are quite similar, but simple because TRBL is the only other heavily streaked black blackbird species. However, female RWBLs cause such problems in ID because those same beginning and less-experienced birders have not learned to distinguish between streaked blackbirds and sparrows... and between streaked blackbirds and finches. That means that effective written descriptions of such birds require many more words about plumage features, but, more importantly, about bill size and shape, overall structure, leg length, etc. Those latter differentiators -- shape, structure, etc. -- are the very things that the beginning and less-skilled birders have not figured out, so the detailed descriptions are not particularly useful for such birders. Charlie Spencer is correct about the historical-inertia aspect of descriptions, specifically, and male-biased interest, in general, and that inertia certainly accounts for at least some of the difference in treatments of the sexes.
    2 points
  32. Yes @Tony Leukering! This is very helpful!!! I, for one, appreciate spoonfeeding. 👏
    2 points
  33. 2 points
  34. Head is at an angle so tough to judge bill length. The stocky build, maybe just a large lunch, had me leaning Greater for that one. Where are the experts when you need them!!
    2 points
  35. I'm leaning, but only slightly, towards Lesser for the bird on the left in the first photo. Agree the bird in second photo is Greater (long upturned bill and lots of side barring).
    2 points
  36. @neilpa I believe your Michigan Sulphur is an Orange Sulphur based on location and some of the smaller marks on the wings. Keep in mind I an not an expert just a hobbyest with a book.
    2 points
  37. @neilpa The Swallowtail you have as Indra is actually a Black Swallowtail. Location for one is key. The one undamaged tail is also too long for Indra. No promises on the rest for ids. I have a busy next couple of days.
    2 points
  38. Not too sure if this still pic may help too?
    2 points
  39. You're way too far north and west for similar-looking Carolina. The facial pattern is very different on a Mountain, the cap and sides are brown on a Boreal, and you may be too far west for them anyway. Black-capped is all that's left.
    2 points
  40. Nope just day 0 because this is just a small stop Water Nothing I just meant it was way to hot and their were not many birds
    2 points
  41. Young Night-Heron. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-crowned_Night-Heron# https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-crowned_Night-Heron/id
    2 points
  42. Most juvenile birds, including egrets, are the size of the adults when they leave the nest.
    2 points
  43. Thought so, wanted to confirm. Seeing a lot of tufted titmouses/mice? in yard lately. They have funny antics.
    2 points
  44. Brown Pelican https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/351756641
    2 points
  45. The primaries of swifts account for MUCH more of the wing length relative to the secondaries than on swallows; as far as I know, on all species of swifts vs. all species of swallows. This provides an excellent feature for distinguishing the two groups. Note the proportions on your bird relative to those on a Vaux's Swift in pix below. Even more excellent is that the two groups have VERY different flight styles and flap cadences. Learn those!
    2 points
  46. Nice shots. They're notoriously uncooperative subjects.
    2 points
  47. That's a male Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Note the tiny bill, white eyering, and black bar under a white wingbar. There's nothing called an Orange-crowned Sparrow. I think you meant an Orange-crowned Warbler, but that species lacks the white wingbar and has a differently shaped eyering.
    2 points
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