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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/08/2021 in all areas

  1. I'm going for Peregrine. The head is too strongly marked and the tail isn't banded enough for a Merlin. Also a perched Merlin's wings fall short of its tail. But stay tuned for the experts.
    11 points
  2. Some PNW wildflowers from last spring/summer Lanceleaf Stonecrop Showy Milkweed Elkweed Sagebrush Mariposa Lily Western Trillium Columbia Lily Tweedy's Lewisia Fairyslipper
    8 points
  3. Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, note the long legs and feet ruling out Black-crowned. Least Bittern is much, much smaller, even significantly smaller than a Green Heron. Also paler and brighter coloration overall.
    7 points
  4. That's because, in addition to being rare, they usually don't last long in the wild.
    7 points
  5. Before getting to the meat of this response, I point out that the depicted bird here is a male Semi, with a bill much shorter than that of Sanderling. If it had been a female, the bill-length would not have been as useful or, even, useful at all. Let's go back to plumage basics. The depicted bird is in alternate plumage. This plumage differs from the appearance of basic plumage in the same species by the more highly colored scapulars and wing coverts and -- particularly -- by the streaking on the chest. Here is a Sanderling in full alternate plumage. This plumage differs from the appearance of basic plumage in the same species by a LOT of stuff. However, note that no plumage of Sanderling involves streaking on the underparts. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/347696551 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/235649851 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/332604571 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/98780841 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/156747161 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/342297971 - This is probably about the closest that SAND comes to obvious streaking. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/258205191 - Note the obvious black wrist, a feature that, while not always visible, is an absolute distinguishing feature of SAND. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/262223411 - I threw this one in just because it's a cool photo! When trying to distinguish between similar or somewhat similar species, pay attention to how they differ, not how they're similar. Study primary projection, wingtip projection, precise patterns on individual feathers, etc. In other words, look at the bird; study the bird's parts, not just the bird as a whole.
    6 points
  6. Believe it or not that’s a Song Sparrow
    6 points
  7. Maple Seed Pods Cherry Blossoms Cut-leaf Teasel (An invasive )
    6 points
  8. Welcome to Whatbird! I agree with Charlie...sounds like an Eastern Kingbird to me, with the white tip on it's tail.
    6 points
  9. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/352897821 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/352897771
    6 points
  10. Same RWBL, different angle 😁 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/353079551
    5 points
  11. Habitat can be a useful hint, but it should never be the sole basis of an ID. Your earlier statement regarding habitat was not incorrect, per se, just perhaps a bit of an over generalization. Regarding head shape, that is not a very reliable feature on flying birds, however the wing pattern is diagnostic.
    5 points
  12. You can see a distinct break between the dark blue cap and the pale blue back of the neck if you look closely
    5 points
  13. Juv RSHA -- note the strongly barred secondaries and the narrow pale tail bands
    5 points
  14. Nothing good for birds today but at least I got a few dragonflies. Hopefully got my IDs right dragonfly / Blue Dasher? dragonfly / Western Pondhawk? (male) dragonfly / Western Pondhawk? (female) dragonfly / Western Pondhawk? (female)
    5 points
  15. I think Cooper’s based on the straight leading edge to the wing and large head, but I could be wrong
    4 points
  16. Remember when he comes with the flower you have to take it from him, BEFORE you start running.
    4 points
  17. It looks like a Cooper’s Hawk, personally, but since you said it was just a little bigger than a Steller’s Jay makes me lean Sharpie. Wait for the experts.
    4 points
  18. A couple more from Colorado. Again I do not know the ids. If anyone can provide ids I would appreciate it and will get them labeled in my files
    4 points
  19. So close to an incredible shot...... Dang branches
    4 points
  20. Commons NEVER have that little black on the head.
    4 points
  21. It's a Royal Tern. Larger orange bill, white cap & black line behind the eye
    4 points
  22. Greaters can often be seen on large bodies of water far inland during migration and winter. EDIT- oh, and Lessers like saltwater just as much as Greaters do.
    4 points
  23. @Seanbirds I learned tons from the ABA photo quizzes by Tony Leukering, funny because he's on here too. I also did all of the earlier ABA quizzes. The quiz with the red-crowned parrot: https://www.aba.org/january-2021-photo-quiz/
    3 points
  24. Digging through the archives and ran across these pics. I initially called it a Peregrine Falcon, now I'm thinking I was wrong. I'm now leaning towards Merlin. Image was taken in NW Missouri in September last year.
    3 points
  25. Yes, eclipse male Mallard. Probably has some domestic genes with that bold face pattern.
    3 points
  26. Cooper's, absolutely. The white tip wears off by late in the plumage cycle, which is where we are now. Tail shape is variable in all accipiter species with, generally, adults and males having squarer-tipped tails than juveniles and females. This is an adult male. The right r6 (as seen well in the first pic) is noticeably shorter than the adjacent r5 and the outside corner of that feather is rounded. The crown is contrastingly black -- and this is always a deal-breaker for an ID of SSHA.
    3 points
  27. But, it also means they are being eaten. No swallows means no predators.
    3 points
  28. More fence bird treasure-a variety of thrushes. Photo 4 a Mountain Bluebird in Florida 😲
    3 points
  29. For what little it's worth, the back of the head / nape of the neck looks dark in the second photo. That would be indicative of Sharpie over Coop.
    3 points
  30. Just a few "Other" from previous adventures in NE Florida.
    3 points
  31. Agree with Song Sparrow (a wet one).
    3 points
  32. Excellent photos and subject matter!
    3 points
  33. The first one is likely a Ruby-throated, but Archilochus sp. is the safest call I suppose. I can’t see any of the other photos. When I click on the link it says Restricted Access.
    3 points
  34. Another bad picture, but, I continue to be impressed with these birds. Mississippi Kite with Barn Swallow. I can't even catch them [Barn Swallows] in flight with my camera.
    3 points
  35. I think it may be a Gstacks's Polyphonous, which I think would be a pretty good bird there for the time of year.
    3 points
  36. None of the primaries have obvious white in the pale wing stripe, hence Lesser, as depicted in field guides.
    3 points
  37. 3 points
  38. Ill mark it as a Common Gallinule
    2 points
  39. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/352198161
    2 points
  40. Osprey with catfish 21 Jun 2021 Pinellas co. FL
    2 points
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