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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/15/2021 in all areas

  1. This one if from a while back (February) but never got around to uploading the picture. It was really amazing seeing this one (first time seeing an owl in the wild in general for me)! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/354510951
    14 points
  2. Rufous-tailed Jacamar https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/354471471
    12 points
  3. Rufous-tailed Jacamar Audio: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/349505591
    10 points
  4. I placed my order for Birding Basics by Sibley when I was replying to the recommendation by Quiscalus quiscula, that's Tuesday @ 6:16pm. According to USPS: " Your item departed a shipping partner facility at 1:22 am on July 15, 2021 in AUSTELL, GA 30168. This does not indicate receipt by the USPS or the actual mailing date." which is pretty quick. As you know I already have the Nat Geo Field Guide - and I did commit the cardinal sin of not checking when I got the answer to the Eastern Bluebird, and with hindsight - I could have found it by guessing it was a bluebird myself in the Nat Geo. So you see I remain glueless.... that's why people think I'm unhinged, but glued in hinges are pretty useless.... (follow that stream of consciousness thinking) 🤪
    9 points
  5. Heermann's Gull in flight. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/354582091
    8 points
  6. Are we also doing birds from other countries? Taken some time back in the Netherlands, a European robin
    8 points
  7. Some Critically Endangered Great Green Macaws in the wild.
    8 points
  8. 7 points
  9. Yes, and from the red feathers in the wings, I would say an ash red of some pattern with pied. However, an ash red cannot have a blue/black tail, so genetically it has to be a blue, with bronzing in the wings. Only other possibility is a mosaic, which are very rare in feral.
    7 points
  10. Thank you. I've been making a case for several months that not everyone who comes here is interested in developing ID skills. One alternative reason is photographers wanting to know what they've shot. Now that you've stated your goal, I for one will try to keep it in mind, and phrase my responses accordingly. We'll be here if you eventually want to develop more birding skills (or don't).
    6 points
  11. While @Charlie Spenceris undoubtably a very clever and witty guy, attackee is an established dictionary word from long ago, just sayin', LOL!!! 🙂 attackee noun at·tack·ee | \ ə-ˌta-ˈkē \ plural attackees Definition of attackee : someone or something that is the victim or target of an attack : one that is attacked -When it attacked someone, an article often included a rebuttal from that person at the story's end—no need to wait for a nasty letter from the attackee in the following month's issue.— Bob Betcher, Press Journal (Vero Beach, Florida), 2 Nov. 2001 -This posture will usually cause the attacker to hold off long enough for the attackee to hurry back to its own territory.— Larry S. Thompson, Audubon Magazine, September 1985 First Known Use of attakee 1872, in the meaning defined above NOTE: Information was copied from https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/attackee
    6 points
  12. @Jodi NielsonYour photo above reminded me of this one I have from a few years ago. It was not shot as a black & white photo yet appears as though it was. It is also not a drawing.
    6 points
  13. American Pipit, not your normal fencepost bird
    6 points
  14. Yup. Nice bird!
    6 points
  15. This is all you need:
    6 points
  16. I’ve had a Bee Hummingbird attack an Ostrich (thanks google)
    6 points
  17. Peregrine Falcon
    6 points
  18. They’re not one of my favorites, but I find them really cool. I wish I had a better photo.....as they’re pretty common here on the coast. Especially bolsa chica.
    6 points
  19. 6 points
  20. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.
    6 points
  21. 5 points
  22. That’s a fairly problematic field mark. Keep in mind that their bills, like so many other shorebirds, are flexible and can appear differently depending on what the bird is doing. Just take a look through the photos and you will see a lot of variation. https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=lobdow&mediaType=p&sort=rating_rank_desc&q=Long-billed Dowitcher - Limnodromus scolopaceus
    5 points
  23. You guys are very kind.... I tried telling that to the nice officer when stopped for doing over the limit... Still got a ticket - going to that concert tomorrow. 😁
    5 points
  24. Well I have seen 13 Nuthatchs! 4 Red-breasted and 9 White-breasted.😫
    5 points
  25. 5 points
  26. American Redstart
    5 points
  27. 5 points
  28. House Finch. A Pine Siskin would have yellow in the wings and a shorter tail with a deeper notch.
    5 points
  29. No it's OK you go first, I'm right behind you.
    5 points
  30. 1. I'm liking Summer Tanager.. The phrases are too separated for BHGR, and also you can hear some high pitched phrases as well... but the individual phrases fit better for Tanager than Robin. 2. Yellow-breasted Chats. They make the chatter and churr sound 3. Another Chat
    5 points
  31. After finally getting a herps life list going (58) I decided to count up my Tiger Beetles. I came up with 15 but I have 7 that I have not identified yet. I only have Festive Tiger Beetle counted as one but I have photos of 3 color variations of Festive. The unicolored one is Florida the others all Colorado.
    5 points
  32. This is not a drawing, it's just over-exposed. Bright sun with a pond behind them. I think it's kinda cool though.
    5 points
  33. Gray Catbird Rusty Blackbird Eastern Towhee Prothonotary Warbler
    5 points
  34. Not necessarily singing, more like shouting I'm hungry! 😉
    5 points
  35. Dickcissel Henslow's Sparrow
    5 points
  36. Marsh Wren - an old one but one of my favourites.
    5 points
  37. Yellow-throated Warbler.
    5 points
  38. 5 points
  39. Check the Latin names. Plenty of birds have common names that don't indicate their families. Juncos and towhees are in the sparrow family. Orioles are a subset of blackbirds. Heron, bitterns, and egrets are all related. And some common names are confusing. Water thrushes aren't thrushes, they're warblers. Not everything that paddles on the surface of the water is a duck.
    4 points
  40. I great way to start figuring out what type of bird you are looking at is to peruse the field guide before you see a bird. If you can start just thumbing through and begin to familiarize yourself with the types of birds/families, it helps narrow things down a lot once you do see a bird you are interested in IDing.
    4 points
  41. 4 points
  42. Western Meadowlark
    4 points
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