Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/04/2021 in all areas

  1. 14 points
  2. Green Heron showing his impressively extendable neck. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/358843751
    10 points
  3. Oregon Dark-eyed Junco https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/358843201
    10 points
  4. It appears to be swallowing a banana whole.
    10 points
  5. Green-tailed towhee while visiting Colorado
    9 points
  6. Eurasian Kestrel in flight https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/358922241
    9 points
  7. This doesn’t strike me as a Pewee. Why not Willow Flycatcher?
    8 points
  8. I tried to think of a clever caption but that is not me today 😂 Longest streamer I’ve ever seen anyways...
    8 points
  9. Age question on these two. I'm thinking the top one is a non-breeding adult and the bottom one a juvenile, or are they both juveniles?
    7 points
  10. Lunch time for a black-crowned night heron … I wonder what it was eating!
    6 points
  11. Pied-billed Grebe is correct.
    6 points
  12. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/358959101
    6 points
  13. And this is why you never observer the bird overhead with your mouth open!
    6 points
  14. That first shot is incredible! Hard to find friendly spotties with a nice fore/background.
    6 points
  15. I'd give a quarter to unsee that.
    6 points
  16. I can't choose between these three photos, so I'm just going to post all three! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/358772961 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/358773001 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/358773341
    6 points
  17. When I saw that @Connor Cochrane posted this I nearly fainted.
    5 points
  18. Great shot!! Love the new profile pic 😛
    5 points
  19. Both birds are Yellow Warblers, IMO.
    5 points
  20. Wild Mock Orange blossoms
    5 points
  21. Female summer Tanager.
    5 points
  22. I'll defer to those with more expertise (compared to my none) but I don't think there's enough here to distinguish from an immature mallard in August. They're weird enough with all the domestic genes floating around especially that I'd be wary of identifying anything exciting from this picture, but if there's something interesting there I would encourage you to look at pictures of pintail x mallard and see if there's anything there of interest. But as I said, I'm really not an expert.
    5 points
  23. Agreed! And the media notes, too:
    5 points
  24. 5 points
  25. If y’all like shape shifting herons, you should love the Least Bittern on this checklist https://ebird.org/checklist/S57638662
    5 points
  26. I disagree. Tail looks too short for TOSO and structure looks a little off. Looks like Mountain Bluebird to me.
    4 points
  27. "I always wanted to try my hand at skywriting."
    4 points
  28. Definitely a Snow Goose
    4 points
  29. Not much else to add here other than make sure you are using autofocus, not manual focus (very difficult to manually focus while Pelagic birding). The more reach the better, so I would say to use the lens that gives you maximum reach. I agree that it can be very cold offshore and it can be windy. I’ve seen people come on board grossly unprepared. It’s better to have to take off layers if you are too hot, versus not having enough layers and being really cold. I have seen people who are cold and miserable on boats, and it’s no fun on a trip that can last 10-11 hours. Also, be kind to yourself with regards to photographing pelagic birds. It’s a challenging endeavor. You are moving, the boat is moving, the birds are moving, they disappear and reappear behind the swells. The laws of space and time can seemingly not apply when you are out on the open ocean. It’s not something people are usually good at right out of the gate. So, try your best, have fun, and don’t get too frustrated if you come back to shore with a boatload 😉 of blurry shots. In time, you will get better.
    4 points
  30. With a little orange around the edges.
    4 points
  31. "Duck sp.", but I'm a craven little coward.
    4 points
  32. For sure. I'm doing my first pelagic in a week and a half and these are some things I hadn't considered.
    4 points
  33. For most pelagic trips I just keep my camera with me at all times. If it's raining or the seas are really rough I'll probably put my camera away for a while, but usually the beats are large enough that you shouldn't get wet. You'll be in California during early fall, so it almost certainly won't rain, and the seas are usually pretty calm. I use a zoom lens, much of the time the birds will be fairly far out, but depending if the boat is chumming (I think you said you were in Monterey so they won't be) the birds can get pretty close in. I'd recommend using something with a good amount of zoom. Stabilizing shots can usually be one of the hardest parts of photography on a boat. I'd recommend using as high of a shutter speed as you can, I usually stand up without holding on to the rails and squat when a wave comes up to keep my camera in the same spot, but that definitely would be difficult for someone without good knees or balance. The back of the boat is usually more stable, but on the bow you wave a wider field of view which usually means you can see more birds. Other than that, take some seasickness medications before you get on the boat. I'm not too familiar with the process sense I don't get seasick, but I know they alway recommend taking it before you get on. You should know that it can get cold at sea. Even though you're in California during fall, by the coast and especially out at sea it can get cold. Especially sense this is your first pelagic, I'd get near someone who is knowledgeable about pelagic birds. The best birds will usually be called out over the PA system, but most others are not. Most companies have 'spotters' on board who are experienced pelagic birders who can point stuff out. Lastly, I guess to be prepared that birds move by fast, and can often be tricky to find. Usually, people call out where the bird is by imagining the boat is a clock. For example, you'll hear something like: Buller's Shearwater heading left at 4:30.
    4 points
  34. 1: Looks more like a Common Cuckoo to me 2: Yellowhammer 3: Spotted Flycatcher?
    4 points
  35. I always use the LCD screen on my point-and-shoots. There's no way I could zoom in and keep the bird in the frame while looking through the viewfinder. And besides, the quality of the EVF on my point-and-shoot is poor. For me: Point-and-shoot -- LCD with the camera strap pulled against my neck and elbows underneath and against my body for stability DSLR -- viewfinder for normal shooting; occasionally LCD tilted for low angles
    4 points
  36. Oh my gosh, I'm still laughing!
    4 points
  37. I know it's hard to tell from the pictures but I was literally inches away when I inspected him. The light wasn't perfect but no, his throat was black with a few white blotches. And yes, I clean my feeders regularly. He looked like this when he first appeared a few days ago. I've had feeders up for years and I've never seen one like this...
    4 points
  38. Why not young male?
    4 points
  39. Amazing shots!!! The Spotted Sandpipers around me never let you get within forty feet of them!
    4 points
  40. Should have put a disclaimer that the mental image you may have had of a small, fluffy, possibly cute heron, would be permanently erased after seeing that.
    4 points
  41. Early in the year, the Muscovy Ducks in my area were mostly all black and white. Looks like the brutal sun has bleached most of the black feathers to brown. This one still has a little black left:
    4 points
  42. Sometimes Green Herons are twice as tall with proportionally long necks too...
    4 points
×
×
  • Create New...