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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/11/2021 in all areas

  1. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/360575791 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/360576351
    10 points
  2. 9 points
  3. Suburban deck, lumber, probably pressure-treated.
    9 points
  4. From Tahoe. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/360568511
    8 points
  5. That's good enough to be in a field guide!
    8 points
  6. Joe was struggling in his new job. He hadn’t realized how hard being Big Blue’s backpack would be.
    8 points
  7. Hey, when I said I'd scratch your back, I didn't mean at 35 miles an hour!
    8 points
  8. Here’s my real entry: 😉
    7 points
  9. This happened a month or two ago, but it was just too cool not to share here. I was at one of my favorite little hotspots, not far from my house, when I heard a big racket coming from a area of planted evergreen forest, which is basically like an acre-sized patch boreal forest. There was a group of GCKI squabbling! I saw two males and a female. They were hidden in the canap ou for a few minutes, before the two males came into view. They faced off beak to beak on a branch, then flared the crowns out farther than I’ve ever seen. Kinglet crowns never get old. They then started drifting down through the branches, calling and fighting, until they ran out of branches about 15 feet above the forest floor. Now this was in a little opening, of which I was standing at the opposite edge from them. They then LOCKED FEET, and SPIRALED down to the ground, like a maple seed. It was like they thought they were eagles!!! Just before they would have landed softly on the ground, they broke apart, and then perched Creeper-like on the trunks of the trees. One of the birds flew off into the forest, and the other moved back up the trees, letting its crown finally smooth out. It then met up with a female, and they talked for a couple seconds. Then, the male flew and SAT NEXT TO A MALE PARULA that had appeared out of nowhere, and they seemed to have a deep conversation for a few minutes. Then, they just went in with their bird business back in the treetops. Meanwhile I was standing dumbstruck, not daring to blink or switch from bins to camera, with my mouth hanging open. wish I could’ve gotten a video. Possibly the coolest thing I’ve seen birds do.
    7 points
  10. Well...I've never seen one. Can I draw my Greater Domestic-Chicken instead?
    7 points
  11. Everybody enjoys a free ride now and then.
    7 points
  12. What on earth did I stumble into here 😂 (Couldn’t post earlier, didn’t know @Seanbirds wifi password and the connection was bad)
    6 points
  13. Whose house are you hiding in, @Kevin?
    6 points
  14. Oh, really? Whoops! If your kitchen table looks like my floor, then does my kitchen table look like your floor? (This is why I'm bad at logic).
    6 points
  15. House Sparrow down in L.A. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/360564551
    6 points
  16. 6 points
  17. I most definitely will be taking a taxi next time! That is is I live that long!!!😱
    6 points
  18. In honor of our new member @Bombycilla Cedorum, I drew this Cedar Waxwing today. Drawn freehand with reference of several bird guidebooks.
    6 points
  19. I love almost all sports. Classical music is pretty much what I do all day, because I plan to be professional musician, so I immerse myself in concertos, symphonies, sonatas, etc. I also enjoy reading, especially biographies.
    6 points
  20. I added sharpness, contrast, and clarity. Original: new:
    6 points
  21. Wow! That looks a lot like mine!
    6 points
  22. Man, that is one dirty camera ...
    6 points
  23. Day 3 Time to finally get around to writing this post (these take a long time). I still have to upload some photos from this day, so maybe I'll link them later. This day I spent my time around El Sliencio Lodge where we were staying. We stayed here because the rest of the family wanted to do some activities that they would enjoy before we headed off to a more birder centric hotel. Because there weren't many people here because of COVID, we were upgraded to one of the suites, and it was a great experience. The birding also turned out great. I wandered the property and some surrounding roads before the rain started pouring around noon. I got out early (5:10 AM) and started walking the property. I started picking up many of the mid-elevation birds including the abundant Common Chlrorspingus, the loud Sulpher-bellied Flycatcher and the tiny Slate-colored Redstart. However, the most interesting bird of the early morning came when we were walking along a road near a divide between a field and the forest and flushed a bird off the ground. I didn't got a good look at it, so I made the deciscion to bushwhack up the hill where it went (I would not recommend doing this in the tropics). I did so and it ended up being a Common Paraque. This was an incredible find because of the elevation, this is one of the highest reports of the species in the country. When I birded with one of the biggest birders in Costa Rica the next day, he believed it was due to climate change. I haven't uploaded many photos to this early morning checklist yet because of the low light at the time, but I probably will soon. Here is the checklist. Paraque After walking the property, I decided to head out to one of the two roads that head up and out into the forest. I decided to walk the road that headed towards Bosque de Paz, a famous birding hotel. Even though I never was able to reach the hotel, I did find many good birds along the was. As I was to learning, roadside birding is great in the tropics, and I would recommend anyone going down there to walk roads early in the morning if it seems safe. Anyways, while walking around this road we gained around 200 feet in elevation, and while that might seem like a small amount, it actually resulted in a whole new set of species, which shows how birds in the tropics are extremely linked to elevation. One of the most prevalent birds here was the Gray-breasted Wood Wren, a secretive bird with a loud song that took awhile to get good looks at. Some other interesting birds included Violet Saberwing, Brown-capped Vireo, Tufted Flycatcher, Barred Becared, Ruddy Treerunner, and Red-headed Barbet, all of which will be picured below. I wish I had more time to bird the road, as we were running into mixed flock after mixed flock, however I had to get back to the hotel in time for breakfast. On the way back I ran into a nice man who was out Mountain Biking who wanted his photo taken. I was able to use my broken Spanish skills (You would think I'd be a lot better after taking Spanish for 8 years, but let's just say before last year my Spanish education has been a bit subpar...) to figure out what he was asking and to get his email address. We made our way back to the hotel just in time for breakfast, after which I headed to our room to identify the unknowns from the outing. Here is the checklist from that outing. As with most of my lists, I'm sure I would have had a lot more species there if I knew how the calls of the birds in the area. Gray-breasted Wood Wren Audio: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/349000021 Violet Saberwing -- Though it is a little hard to tell from the photo, it's an all purple hummingbird, definitely one of the coolest birds of the trip. Audio (Very odd sounding for a hummingbird): https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/349001041 Brown-capped Vireo (Poor) Audio - Sounds pretty similar to an eastern WAVI: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/348999841 Sulpher-bellied Flycatcher Audio: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/349000631 Tufted Flycatcher Barred Becard Ruddy Treerunner Red-headed Barbet After I ate breakfast and identified most of my unknowns of the trip, I went to the yard behind our room where I some birds came up close for photos, some of which ended up being some of my best photos of the trip. Slaty Flowerpiercer Mountain Elaenia Volcano Hummingbird After that the rain started to pour so I took a nap and relaxed around the room. During a break my family went down the waterfall hike and came back reporting many birds. With the rain starting to break, and being more interested in heading out birding then heading out with the rest of the family to head to the main building to socialize, I headed out. This ended up being a poor decision, but I'll get to that later. I headed out to the waterfall trail. The birds were pretty quiet on the way there, but as soon as I entered the forest in the afternoon I realized why people don't go birding in the middle of the forest in the tropics. At times it was so dark I needed my phone flashlight. Of course soon after I entered the forest a thunderstorm started, but stupid me was determined and continued on. I hiked the whole trail, at times having branches fall within feet of me, but escaped the forest without harm. On the way back lightning struck so close I could hear it rippling away from me. I made the mile and a half trek back in open areas to the room unharmed. I was soaked when I got back, but I did get a few lifers on the hike, so I would say it was worth it. Some of those included Slaty-backed Nightingale Thrush, Yellow-thighed Brushfinch and Streaked-breasted Treehunter. One cool bird that I couldn't document was Black-breasted Wood-Quail,. During the storm a covey ran right in front of me (within touching distance) as I happened to cross the creek bed they were climbing up at the prefect time. The checklist can be seen here. Slaty-backed Nightingale Thrush Audio: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/348948331 Yellow-thighed Brushfinch Streak-breasted Treehunter (no photo due to the rain). https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/349002841 Costa Rican Wabrler Audio: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/348953511 I After that it continued to violently rain all night. The locals said that it was rare to see a rain storm that large in the area. After dinner I set my alarm early again, because tomorrow was going to be my first guided birding day.
    6 points
  24. R. W. became know as the father of the newest Olympic avian sport, Sky Surfing.
    6 points
  25. Bill looks wrong for YGVI to me and, although not completely out of the question, the vast majority of YGVIs in CA occur after the first week in Sept. That being said, better pictures of this bird would help determine what it is.
    6 points
  26. Juvenile crows can be tough especially. Young American crows often give raspy calls, that can superficially resemble Fish Crows. Feel free to take a recording when you encounter these two, it can help a lot!
    6 points
  27. Good night! Don’t let the Screech owls bite.
    6 points
  28. 1. Wilson’s Phalarope 2. Baird’s Sandpiper 3. Long-billed Dowitchers
    6 points
  29. Leg, bill, and lore color is very variable on juvenile Snowy Egrets. Some Snowy Egret juveniles can look almost exactly like juvenile Little Blue Herons (except lacking dark primary tips) and some can look a lot like Cattle Egrets. Here’s an example of a juvenile Snowy Egret with leg color more like a juvenile Little Blue.
    5 points
  30. I didn't realize that Snowy Egret could have yellow legs when young, which really threw me off track when added to the way the egrets were standing. Guess I've learned something new!
    5 points
  31. 😂 It does look like a penguin though! I might die of cuteness poisoning if I saw a penguin that small.
    5 points
  32. Green Heron I believe. Wait for others to confirm.
    5 points
  33. That’s a fluffed out Blue Jay. Welcome to Whatbird!
    5 points
  34. It’s a great photo. Two things for me make it a hit 4. Since it’s in a birdbath, it doesn’t seem like a natural placement to me. However, since it’s such a sharp shot, that doesn’t make too much of a difference, you know maybe something to debate over. However, the main thing for me is that you cut off the tail. If the entire tail was in the photo, I’d likely give it a five.
    5 points
  35. Why don’t we do… Greater Prairie-Chicken! (Suggested by @Bombycilla Cedorum who is now trying to manipulate my every post)
    5 points
  36. We need to revive this thread. It’s a lot of fun! May I choose the bird to draw this time? @The Bird Nuts @HamRHead @Colton V @Melierax @God's Child @Connor Cochrane @MichaelLong
    5 points
  37. I'm going with HY Chestnut-sided Warbler. Green top, grey sides and the big eye-ring along with the strong wing bars.
    5 points
  38. I'm pretty sure you have a young Eastern Towhee. Pink legs and feet, a black bill evolved for cracking seeds, a towhee's long tail, chowing down on sunflower seeds. Compare it with this one from Macaulay: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/360204761 If I'm wrong (again), it's definitely in the sparrow family.
    5 points
  39. One of my favorite things to have witnessed is this Snowy Egret Manatee surfing in the St. John's River in Florida. As the Manatee ate the greens it stirred up edibles for the Egret. The only problem is the Manatee showed it's head very few times during this encounter and then only for a split second so I was unable to ever get a shot of the Manatees head/face. I took a bunch of photos but none show the head/face of the Manatee. Very cool experience seeing this. Sad I couldn't quite get that perfect shot. 2-2019
    5 points
  40. The bird on the right is tilting over a lot more than a Dowitcher, that posture is diagnostic for Stilt Sandpiper because they have proportionately longer legs and shorter bill so they tilt over more. They also just have really long thin legs
    5 points
  41. Western Bluebird https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/360387231
    5 points
  42. Wow excellent! Thank you @Quiscalus quiscula
    4 points
  43. I can’t separate Alder/Willow without call reliably, so it’s a Traill’s for me.
    4 points
  44. I’m afraid it’s not possible to rule out American Crow without audio.
    4 points
  45. Baird’s are usually the most common peep in the northern Rockies
    4 points
  46. I was actually inspired by your username @Quiscalus quiscula, and that this particular scientific name goes with my initials, not to mention the Cedar Waxwing is one of my favorite birds.
    4 points
  47. It's rather difficult to land on a moving perch.
    4 points
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