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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/28/2021 in all areas

  1. Short-eared Owl, Burrowing Owl, Northern Pygmy-Owl, Barn Owl, and Great Horned Owl.
    8 points
  2. I only ever saw the one Great Grey Owl...
    7 points
  3. Prothonotary Warbler. If you can't ID it solely by ear and on the quality of the sound, it pays to look at the spectrogram. Notice the convex shape of the notes, (i.e. down then up), where American Redstart is almost always concave (it goes up then down) or straight down. So this is actually an audible difference- because Prothonotary ends in an 'up' note, it has the sound of going 'sweet sweet sweet', which phonetically rises at the end. On the other hand, American Redstarts will go 'wee oohh wee oohh', which phonetically drops at the end. Also, OP's recording is too slow for Redstart anyway.
    7 points
  4. Definitely, but fortunately the aforementioned species are largely exploiting novel niches that are the result from unfortunate human encroachment. For example, Limpkin have been spreading across the southeast and feeding on invasive apple snails. Spoonbills are just having crazy good breeding success lately so in post-breeding dispersal they just Yeet everywhere. The unfortunate thing is the reason those new niches exist. Invasive apple snails, bridge culverts, etc. But at least something is benefiting from humanity's endless manifest destiny.
    7 points
  5. I've seen a nest being visited by both a Cliff and Cave swallow. Pretty sure those kiddos in the nest were hybrids. It was a vagrant Cave Swallow in Georgia that didn't have any other Caves to pair with. On a related note, Cave Swallow populations in Texas increased 898% between 1957 and 1999, thanks to the advent of culverts and other DOT infrastructure. Who's to say how much that statistic has increased since 1999, but the population has been steadily increasing. If they maintain the same rate as was estimated in the original paper (Kosciuch et. al 2006) then the population should be at a 1,125% increase in Texas between 1957-2021. Also note that that figure doesn't include Florida populations, which are also expanding. I wonder what the figures look like for Roseate Spoonbill, Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Limpkin, etc. It's nice to see species expanding.
    7 points
  6. It's nice to see different species getting along. 🙂
    6 points
  7. 6 points
  8. I am really glad to see you starting to be a regular again! You are a new wealth of information.
    6 points
  9. I'm lucky that I can see great horns almost every day! Here are some others:
    6 points
  10. Indeed! Colorado had a good mix of both light and medium coloration owls. Here are a couple more examples of Light and one of the medium.
    6 points
  11. Yep, warbling vireo.
    6 points
  12. Black-chinned Hummer https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/364496811
    6 points
  13. @Lesliemorris you are indeed a Least Sandpiper. Is this a selfie?
    6 points
  14. It is so hot here in central Florida birds hide quite a bit. But, have a few to share. The Black Bellied Whistling ducks show up every fre days.
    5 points
  15. Turkey Vulture. Pink head, all white flight feathers, and a rounder, longer tail. Black Vultures have shorter, triangular tails and white only at the tips of the wings.
    5 points
  16. Something like the Warbler Guide in electronic format is how I envision the future. The use of 3D models, with addition of positioning and a time reference, and comparison of similar species. I envision something with Gulls where you can say have a LBBG and HERG juvenile side by side and can slide to the current month/season to see the different molt/plumage patterns and key identification features. You can adjust for something with wings in or wings out in flight, and move it into 360 degrees angles. Imagine the same for shorebirds or hawks.
    5 points
  17. California gull: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/364498111 Western gull: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/364495261
    5 points
  18. At least it's unknown to me. See at a freshwater lake in southern California. Was in a group of 6.
    4 points
  19. yep. @dragon49 in flight, the best way to tell them apart is wing pattern instead of face coloration
    4 points
  20. The left bird in the last photo looks like Spotted to me. The other bird looks like Solitary.
    4 points
  21. 1 and 2- Lesser Yellowlegs?? 3-Spotted Sandpiper. 4- Solitary?
    4 points
  22. I have very few pictures of Owls, and no really good ones.
    4 points
  23. FOS townsend’s warblers!
    4 points
  24. It's a Western, California don't have pink legs.
    4 points
  25. Western Sandpiper. Bright rufous edging on feathers and curved bill.
    4 points
  26. Cave. Cliff Swallows don’t have the buffy throat. (Only reason I know is that I guessed Cliff too 😉)
    4 points
  27. ive only ever seen one owl in the wild
    4 points
  28. Yesterday morning I got some pretty decent shots including this (young?) common yellowthroat. Love the colors of the moss/lichen matching the bird https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/364278871 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/364042771
    4 points
  29. I don't think you can see the wings well enough in these photos. A Black Vulture doesn't normally show that much di-hedral, and has a shorter tail.
    3 points
  30. I was sitting quietly on the edge of the lake at water level (got my butt wet) and the group of birds approached very close, within a few feet. If you sit quietly for long enough they get used to you. Then it was easy to get frame filling shots.
    3 points
  31. Happy to be back! 😁
    3 points
  32. I agree with Warbling Vireo. Fwiw there is only one August eBird record for Philadelphia Vireo in California.
    3 points
  33. You pretty much can't without hearing them. They are kind of like Eastern/Western Meadowlarks, if you try to identify them without vocals, you are pretty much guessing.
    3 points
  34. Oh yeah, we heard the bitterns but did not see them... well, heard at least one. Which means I'll count it and my daughter probably wont. 😞 Wish I had more time... haven't been to plum island or anywhere but our camping trip really. But, visiting with family and swimming and stuff is all important too right. 🙂
    3 points
  35. YAWN...... what is sleep? I went camping at Brighton State Park in Vermont and it was a good trip. I have a few kids that "hate" birding because they're not really that interested in the birds and hate walking and walking. I'm 44 and I tell them they're kids... I'm out of shape. They should be able to keep up... and, enjoy the other nature around. Eventually they got to feed a chipmunk right out of their hands... WHILE my oldest was doing that she suddenly said "don't move." THREE canada jays flew in to join the feast. They were a bit more nervous than the chipmunks and didn't eat from our hands but one did grab some seed off my hat which was fun. LIFER... Earlier on the trail we had even more excitement... My daughter heard something fly so she looked and 20 to 30 feet up a tree was a male spruce grouse. What an awesome sight. I have pictures but don't know when I'll get to posting them... I'm on vacation... 😛 So two new species just like that. They eventually(thanks to someone else mentioning it) got to hand feed some red-breasted nuthatches... That too was fun. None of the kids wanted to leave that spot. When we finally gave up, the birds followed us down the trail for a while. Later on peanut dam road... well by then my oldest was wiped out so she did not go down as far as I... and so, she missed out. I used some playback and got a couple of boreal chickadees down there. They didn't stick around long enough. Called the kids down the road and the birds were gone and they didn't care about the playback anymore... just silence. Was a cool road and I wish I could have walked further. Earlier on that road there was a couple birding there and we had all stopped to look at some warblers. We all watched this one bird and, we all left stumped... til later on when I was looking at eBird reports from THAT morning where someone reported two bay breasted warblers. Saw some yellowish... the other person there was noticing a more peachy color... two wing bars... it was all starting to make sense. My daughter was pretty excited since she watched it for a while and was making mental notes of the features... she was like "So I can count it... yes." This was our very first bay breasted warbler. I didn't get pictures of the warbler or those new chickadees but four new life birds in one day... it was great. The only disappointment was no moose, with all the signs around. I have seen moose when I was younger but my kids never have... a live(and not dead on road) porcupine would have been nice too. I said if I ever go up that far again I might end up searching for mammals instead. HA. Nothing else new and exciting... I am THINKING about getting on eBird to look for local reports of oystercatchers. I don't want to drive and drive and leave empty handed but I'd sure love to see one. i'm also debating on my trip back to Arkansas in just a few days. 😞 (If it wasn't for an ex that gets visitation of a few of the kids, I'd stay quite a bit longer...) I am wondering if that little egret is still in Delaware and how reliable it is...... I might have to take the longer way home just to see that. I wonder how many hours that would add to the drive. I wish I had more time and energy as I'd then see what else I could find on such a detour... perhaps in other states... more birds I've never seen. We'll see. To oystercatcher search today or not??? Have to give the whole family those take at home covid tests before my sister's wedding tomorrow. How fun. It's bad enough shoving one of those things up your own nose but doing that to kids? humbug.
    3 points
  36. Nice! This is indeed kinda cool! I unfortunately missed this one to see it live..
    3 points
  37. That’s really sad. I absolutely love red Knots! I find them really interesting and they act really cool , too.. I got my lifer red knots a few weeks ago!
    3 points
  38. 3 points
  39. Note that there are only two white primary shafts showing on the upperwing, very limited white on the underwing, overall cold grayish-brown tones with no bright or rusty tones even on the nape, heavily barred undertail coverts, etc. plus overall shape and structure seem right.
    3 points
  40. They look so funny when they stand like this....Great Horned Owl, Mojave Desert.
    3 points
  41. 1. Rock Wren 2. Lark Bunting 3. Northern Pintail 4. More Lark Buntings 5. Lark Bunting I'm jealous of those Lark Buntings, nice birds!
    3 points
  42. I also have coolpix...just a super tiny one.
    2 points
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