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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/31/2021 in all areas

  1. Least Sand https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/365286111
    11 points
  2. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/365265121 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/365265231
    8 points
  3. MN, 8-30-21 Least Bittern : probably the same one as a few days ago -
    7 points
  4. I’m still learning, but for me the biggest clue is the bill. Least bills are proportionally slimmer and pointier relative to the thick and blunt Western bills. Your 4th pic is a good profile where you can see the dainty bill
    7 points
  5. Chalcedon Checkerspot
    6 points
  6. Going through some old photos from earlier this year https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/365537281 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/365537331
    6 points
  7. I agree with this; density of breast streaking also favors Northern.
    6 points
  8. I was looking on google if other people had also had bad experiences about rating with ebird despite having good photos and it seems that I am not alone! I recently uploaded a bunch of Least Bittern photos to ebird and someone is descending my images with one star. It is quite difficult to recover from a bad rating of one star if only few people rate image and I hope ebird will find a solution for that in near future. For the moment, if some of you want to rate my Bittern images, they can be found on this list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S93851865 Thanks,
    6 points
  9. I was thinking maybe REVI for 2?
    6 points
  10. Haha! I got so excited about seeing a new bird, that I didn't even see the LENI map in my field guide. I just found that first nighthawk and kept flipping pages. 😂
    6 points
  11. You've got an Eastern Kingbird, I believe.
    5 points
  12. Townsend's Solitaire https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/365519531
    5 points
  13. A commendable effort, I’d just suggest using more emojis next time
    5 points
  14. Or maybe I just shouldn’t try to identify birds on a phone standing in the ocean at a beach
    5 points
  15. It's not identifiable in terms of plumage, but by the late date is probably referable to Rufous. Though, one has to wonder how much difficult IDs like this simply become positive feedback loops, rather than actual representations of frequency or abundance
    5 points
  16. If you saw something that looked like this in NJ, it would be a Ruby-crowned Kinglet! 🙂
    5 points
  17. 78 Common Nighthawks tonight. Not a huge amount, I know, but it's a record for us.
    5 points
  18. Seen in the Florida panhandle a few weeks ago. A fearsome hunter of Cheez-its.
    4 points
  19. Finally got some decent photos to share with y’all. A pair of Bay-breasted Warblers in my yard. https://ebird.org/checklist/S94007221
    4 points
  20. This is a Nuttall's, the white back on a Downy would be visible in this photo, and you can see the barring of a Nuttall's on the back of the bird in the first photo. Also, at least in my experience, Nuttall's is the more likely species in residential areas here in Central California.
    4 points
  21. Not on the dorsal side of the feet like Blackpoll do. What we can see of the dorsal side of the feet is uniform in color and it looks dark to me. Many passerines have paler metatarsal and digit pads. This is very evident when holding birds in the hand: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/181947411 There is no striation on the mantle like I'd expect for fall Blackpoll and the bill is clearly skinny and tapered. Eyeline and supercilium are well-demarcated. This looks good for a Tennessee Warbler to me.
    4 points
  22. 4 points
  23. Why are you not birdwatching?!
    4 points
  24. Breast is too clean and pale for Dunlin, which are dingy gray on the breast from minute flecks of gray across the width. The bill is on the long side for Western Sandpiper, but still within the length range for the species.
    4 points
  25. Absolutely awesome shots! I've rated them all for you (got at least one back up to 5).
    4 points
  26. 4 points
  27. And nice camera work. Much better than the blurry pics of Common Nighthawks I was able to get recently.
    4 points
  28. I’m not sure some of these are identifiable.
    4 points
  29. Thirded. It's kind of hard to explain how exactly you tell them apart- I think you just need to familiarize yourself with the two species.
    4 points
  30. It was the chirps. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Acadian_Flycatcher/sounds
    4 points
  31. 4 points
  32. I agree that the first two birds are Pectoral Sandpipers, noting the rust-edged,dark centered back feathers and the heavily streaked breast and white belly. They may be juveniles as their medium length slightly de-curved stocky bills don't seem to have an orange base. I'll pass on the peeps. I'm no expert.
    4 points
  33. How’s this? 🐦🚫🟨👣
    3 points
  34. 3 points
  35. The supercilium ends at a point and the streaking is dense. I could certainly be wrong, though.
    3 points
  36. Yes, Hermit Thrush. Hermit Thrushes share their bold spots with the Wood Thrush, but lack the bright reddish brown nape and have buffy flanks with a reddish tail and a distinct whitish eyering.
    3 points
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