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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/21/2021 in all areas

  1. Just finished this piece (acrylics on canvas). "Fluffy" the chickadee is checking it out in the second photo. 😊
    7 points
  2. We live on a mountain lake in the Central Cascades in Oregon near Bend, Oregon. Our lake is about ½ mile wide. I saw an Osprey flying on the far shore of the lake and took my camera and headed across the lake to try to get some pictures. On the way across the lake, I noticed a bullet coming toward me at top speed. I grabbed my camera that shoots 10 frames a second and held the shutter down and panned in the direction the bird was flying as it passed about 15 feet away. There was a good chance I wouldn’t get anything. This is one of the pictures. The bird was a Common Merganser, one of the fastest ducks on the planet. It was flying at about 70 feet per second. If you are a gambler and you insist on betting, in a race against almost all other bird species, bet on the duck! Looking at this photo, you can see why. The bird is aerodynamic and streamlined. Its wings are pointed and efficient with no gaps in the wing feathers to lose efficiency, and it is powerful. I went out after a picture of a soaring Osprey and ended up trying to take a picture of a bullet with the same camera settings. The picture is not perfect, but worth looking at to appreciate nature’s design.
    6 points
  3. Barn Owl in San Dimas CA this morning https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/381313391
    6 points
  4. 100% Song Sparrow. The streaking on the side and back is too broad and fuzzy for a Lincoln's and the color is wrong.
    6 points
  5. Downy Woodpecker in my yard. Was testing out why my camera wasn't focusing well. After almost 200 out of focused shots, I figured it out. Apparently I always need to shoot with a minimum of f/8
    6 points
  6. For people not from an area where salmon live, all the washed up bodies of salmon on the shore is regular and is part of their lifecycle. Any river in late fall which salmon live on is going to be covered in dead fish. Salmon die after spawning and wash up on the banks.
    5 points
  7. Does anyone else frequently look through the bird videos in the Macaulay Library? I do all the time. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/201494131
    4 points
  8. Super cool yard bird and one I do not have on my life list. So if you see some old lady snooping around your yard don't shoot.😁 Kidding
    4 points
  9. Looks like a camera in the living room to me.
    4 points
  10. Wilson’s Snipe. Commons are over in Europe
    4 points
  11. Today: Slaty-backed Gull in King County, WASHINGTON Brown-headed Nuthatch in Finney County, KANSAS (being reported as the Westernmost record ever of this species on ebird.)
    4 points
  12. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/381271141 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/381271121
    4 points
  13. Here's something new! Underwater Goldeneye! Plus a small flock
    4 points
  14. FOS male and female Purple Finch today on feeders
    3 points
  15. In West Tennessee we have found that abieticola is the 2nd most encountered subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk, behind only borealis. I have researched the photos in eBird reported as calurus or calurus/alscensis here and have found no legit records of light morph individuals of those here. It certainly stands to reason that the dark and dark rufous morph Red-tails that we get that are not Harlan's would be abieticola instead of calurus and we are now encouraging the birders here that encounter dark, dark rufous morph, and intermediate morph Red-tails as calurus/abieticola instead of calurus or calurus/alascensis, based on that email from Brian. I don't think that it's that dark morphs of abieticola are exceptionally rare, it's just that we've always assumed that they were calurus until recent years. As in Red-tails in general, even within abieticola there appears to be a great deal of variability and we encounter some light morphs of that subspecies that are heavily marked with white breasts, some that are heavily marked with a rufous wash on the breast, some that are moderately marked with white breasts, some that are moderately marked with rufous washed breasts and everything in between.
    3 points
  16. #1 I would call abieticola without hesitation. #2 I would avoid calling it one, as the juvenile borealis (light eyes) tend to have bigger/darker spots at first. It could very well be one though as it has some of the buffy color on the underwing coverts, and darker patagials. Juvenile borealis seem to have that also, so I personally would just call it a RTHA.
    3 points
  17. This is an email that raptor expert Brian Sullivan (one of the developers of the Raptor ID app) sent out to all of us eBird reviewers back in 2018 regarding abieticola and non-Harlan's dark morph Red-tails in the eastern United States: Red-tailed Hawk subspecies are a quagmire, but we do our best to try to allow people to report distinctive individuals in eBird. The subspecies abieticola was described in 1950 by W. E. Todd and further supported by a peer-reviewed paper from Dickerman and Parkes (1987). Jerry Liguori and I published an article in Birding recently about this taxon, the introduction of which is pasted below: "During migration and winter across the central and eastern Lower 48, heavily marked Red-tailed Hawks cause confusion for many birders. In most cases these birds are identified as Western Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis calurus). But in 1950, W. E. Clyde Todd described a new subspecies of the Red-tailed Hawk in his paper “A Northern Race of Red-tailed Hawk”, which differed from typical Eastern Red-tailed Hawk (B. j. borealis) in having more richly colored underparts, a dark throat, and a heavy bellyband. Todd named this subspecies abieticola (ab-i-et-i-ko-la), reportedly meaning “dweller of the firs”. Despite a well-researched paper, the subspecies did not receive wide recognition. A follow-up paper by Dickerman and Parkes (1987) supported the validity of Todd’s research, and provided a more comprehensive comparison between abieticola, Eastern, and Western Red-tailed Hawks. Dickerman and Parkes stated: “This is the breeding race of the spruce-fir belt of Canada west to Alberta.” Dickerman and Parkes reviewed claims of Western Red-tailed Hawks from the Northeast and found that all purported calurus were actually well marked examples of abieticola. Likewise, we propose that most heavily marked Red-tailed Hawks occurring from the Great Lakes through the Northeast region in migration and winter are abieticola." For what it's worth, I am currently reworking Systematics section of Red-tailed Hawk in BNA, and it will recognize abieticola moving forward. If one recognizes any subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk, one must recognize abieticola. Characters mix across all races, and there are many intermediates, but typical abieticola individuals are fairly straightforward. We also suspect now that dark/rufous morphs occur in this northern race, and that most (all) reported calurus dark/rufous morphs east of the Great Plains pertain to this form. We've added a 'Slash' option to eBird to accommodate this uncertainty, so birders can report these as 'calurus/abieticola' for now. They can do that too for heavily marked light morphs, if they wish. Here's an article on the subspecies in general: https://northernredtails.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/rth_aabieticiola_north_american_birds_march_2014.pdf
    3 points
  18. Yeah! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/309251731
    3 points
  19. Bird 1 is an abieticola for the reasons @Jerry Friedmanlisted. Bird two isn’t as clear cut, but I would guess it’s a borealis.
    3 points
  20. I know we all know it, but I can’t get over how pretty painted bunting males are.! https://ebird.org/species/paibun
    3 points
  21. Sockeye salmon in surprisingly large numbers. Lots of Chinook and pink as well.
    3 points
  22. Well, they are notoriously bad on gas mileage, and although the ride is known to be quiet, they always seem to end up in the shop, and the suspension is only good if you enjoy riding in boats...just my two cents under the assumption the possessive apostrophe was a typo and your verb conjugation is only hit and miss.
    3 points
  23. This bird has a clearly barred tail and a thin subterminal band, both of which are better features for calurus than they are for abieticola.
    3 points
  24. I only have experience with light morph abeiticola, and zero with calarus/alascensis birds, so I can’t add anything useful. If anyone has access to Birds of the World (I got my college to get access, coming soon) maybe they have something?
    3 points
  25. Thanks everyone! I can't say Fluffy liked it; she was very suspicious!
    3 points
  26. White-crowned Sparrow, I believe.
    3 points
  27. We were staying at Portal when someone told us about a bird we were after up a canyon past an old dam. We hiked up there with the camera and didn't find the bird but ran into this small deer on the way back to the trailhead.
    3 points
  28. LeConte’s Sparrow in my yard again!!!!!
    3 points
  29. I have an Egyptian Goose like that. It was at a local farm pond for a couple of days, hanging out with some Canadas. It shows up on my life list but not if you search for sightings. I don't regard it as an issue; it was there, I saw it, I have pictures, it's on my list.
    3 points
  30. @Liam This ought to make you happy, your photo last week finely made me order The WarblerGuide....
    2 points
  31. A Lapland Longspur - it’s starting to feel like winter again!
    2 points
  32. Now this is just impressive! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/201542111
    2 points
  33. I've never seen abieticola that I know of, but 1 looks like a classic example, from what I understand, with the mostly dark throat, heavy "dribbling" from there to the blobby breastband, and unbarred tail (though according to this article by Jerry Liguori, abieticola sometimes has a barred tail). 2 shares some of that, especially the throat, but seems much less heavily marked, so I wouldn't be sure about that one.
    2 points
  34. Raptor experts talk about dark morphs of abieticola on the Raptor ID group on Facebook. They're apparently fantastically rare, if they exist. See this article.
    2 points
  35. Great Black-backed Gull
    2 points
  36. He tried to send them via Homing Pigeon but the pigeon got thrashed.
    2 points
  37. If you zoom in on the pic you can see the pink bill(a trait of the dark lored Ssp.). Also you can see a black crown stripe and a tiny bit of white on top.
    2 points
  38. Pale throat and breast make this a Harlan's, I believe
    2 points
  39. Thought this was a new Plume Moth for me at first, but I think it might be some type of Crane Fly. iNat wasn't a huge help with the ID. Posted to BugGuide and iNat.
    2 points
  40. RTHA identification is much more fun out here. Instead of lumping them all as "just Red-tails", we can go through different subspecies and morphs before lumping almost all as "just Red-tails". By the way, abieticola is seen at least as much in the east, if I'm not mistaken.
    2 points
  41. Thanks so much @God's Child. So glad you like it.
    2 points
  42. Holy cow that is an awe inspiring painting!!!
    2 points
  43. IN THE OPEN TOO!!! Amazing find dude, that’s so awesome! 😯😯
    2 points
  44. You get a message from the moderator explaining the reason for the points. They can be set as permanent or to expire after a time specified by the moderator, or as I said the moderators can remove them. Other consequences are separate - post moderation, banned from posting, and blocked from the site - and are decided on a case-by-case basis. I did check and your warning points are not displayed to other users; only you and the mods/admins can see them.
    2 points
  45. This morning at Green Cay in Boynton Beach FL.
    2 points
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