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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/15/2021 in all areas

  1. The best Rough-legged hawk photo I got!!! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/396004591 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/396004661
    8 points
  2. Thanks. I’m staying at my family’s home, and they’ve got a pond in the back. I’m birding there now, at 7 lifers already.
    6 points
  3. Decidedly a Melospiza sparrow. I'm having trouble making out enough detail to call it, but Song Sparrow seems like a fine option. A Red-winged Blackbird would have different facial pattern, longer conical bill, structurally would be way different, larger, and more stocky, and have different patterning in the coverts, among other things.
    6 points
  4. For sure an intergrade! Yellow throat bordered by white that is wrapping around the articulars and a noticeable supercilium. I always like seeing those!
    5 points
  5. Along with the Ross's, there is also: Varied Thrush in Hickory, NORTH CAROLINA and a potential ABA first Bat Falcon was seen a week ago in Hidalgo County, TEXAS. Hasn't been refound so far, but people sure have been looking. https://ebird.org/checklist/S98863623
    5 points
  6. Looks good for American to me!
    5 points
  7. Ring-necked Pheasant that dodged traffic before posing nicely for a few dozen shots. Definitely one of the prettiest birds I've ever seen.
    5 points
  8. This time of year, I have trouble distinguishing RTLOs from COLOs. I saw this bird yesterday on the ocean at Point Lookout NY. Other birders reported seeing both species there. Based on the upturned bill and mostly white throat, I'm guessing RTLO.
    4 points
  9. Boat-tailed for sure. Big bill and a rounder head than COGR.
    4 points
  10. Most definitely! For differentiating between RTLO and COLO, the bill and face are the easiest things to look at. RTLO has a much smaller bill that appears upturned, and more white in the face. COLO also have a "jagged" throat border. Plus, this bird even has a little red on the throat!.
    4 points
  11. All the males are Lesser, the nails on those birds are much to small for Greater. I do think that one of the females, (the middle bird in the first photo) is a Greater, but wait for more responses.
    4 points
  12. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/396198211 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/396198221
    4 points
  13. I don't think that's Chipping since the eyeline isn't going all the way through to the lores so I say Clay-colored.
    4 points
  14. Confirmed, and they are indeed countable. Nice!!
    4 points
  15. You should have a blast. I live in PA, but travel to Florida a couple of time each winter to escape the cold. I just got back from a 2 week trip. As many times as I've been there, I still managed to get 4 new birds this trip (Whooping Crane, Snail Kite, Crested Caracara and Piping Plover). And I only went out looking for wildlife on three days. Have fun!
    4 points
  16. 4 points
  17. One thing always be wary around fresh water there are always gators in fresh water.
    4 points
  18. The long tail. We don't get great-tailed here.
    4 points
  19. Looks good for Boat-tailed
    4 points
  20. Oops. Meant to post this one haha. But those are good too of course. https://ebird.org/checklist/S98792570
    4 points
  21. https://ebird.org/checklist/S98792827 Some great under-appreciated shots on this list if y’all are bored
    4 points
  22. I agree with Purple Gallinule. Note the frontal shield. Similar to this bird. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/374632161
    4 points
  23. Saw this big bullfrog a few months ago. For comparison, the little guy on the same log a few weeks later
    4 points
  24. You found @PalmWarbler! Maybe I will next spring. 🤣
    4 points
  25. Looks like a Lincoln’s Sparrow, definitely Melospiza.
    4 points
  26. Thanks! There been some discussion among the local birders wondering about this bird as it seems exceptionally unafraid of humans, (doesn't fly off when you're eight feet away from it, and it doesn't seem nervous either) but it seems to be hunting just fine, and doesn't appear to be sick.
    4 points
  27. Look at that Malar!
    4 points
  28. Vesper Sparrow, I think (bold white eyering, white outer tail feathers)
    4 points
  29. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/395952751 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/395952761
    4 points
  30. Here’s my last photo before I leave Allen’s Hummingbird in the rain. This was a very tricky shot, as it was very dark, overcast, and rainy. Lucky I got a sharp shot with such a slow shutter speed. I’m happy that you can see the rain in the background. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/395914491
    4 points
  31. So excited today, Dec. 15, 2021 to see and photograph what I think might be an immature Peregrine falcon. Would be my first encounter with a Peregrine ! Photo taken on Skidaway Island, Chatham County, GA. Fingers crossed Thanks for you input.
    3 points
  32. Thanks Aidan, Loons are pretty easy here, as they often swim close to shore in both the ocean and bay. I have a series of COLO shots showing the change in plumage. I hope I got the IDs correct. Loons
    3 points
  33. 3 points
  34. Taken this morning near Houston, where we overwhelmingly get Myrtle. Could this be a hybrid between the two subspecies? Any comment will be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    3 points
  35. Yep! That's a Peregrine all right!!! Congrats on the lifer! Sniped
    3 points
  36. Congratulations on the lifer!
    3 points
  37. So far: Muscovy duck, Wood stork, anhinga, white ibis, fish crow, boat tailed grackle, palm warbler. And all in my family’s pond in back of their development! I’ll try green cay and wakodahatchee later this week or next week.
    3 points
  38. Y'all are dead to me, and I mean that in the nicest possible way.
    3 points
  39. 3 points
  40. No words. Man those are amazing!!
    3 points
  41. Cool! The Audubon website says "After breeding season, a few (mostly immatures) may stray far north and well inland." (https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/roseate-spoonbill) Anybody know why? Are they being rebellious teenagers and exploring the country before settling down and raising a family? Here's another somewhat rare bird: Rosy-faced Lovebirds, from October 30. They're not rare in parts of Phoenix, but they're rare for the U.S. in general. They're bright, squeaky, and socialize with each other high up in the palm trees. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/395547211
    3 points
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