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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/17/2021 in all areas

  1. Good job getting all the stickers back on straight
    11 points
  2. Thanks. I hate it when my wife is right (happens a lot)
    10 points
  3. Looks like a female House Sparrow to me. Any other photos?
    7 points
  4. It looks good for a pure Mottled Duck to me, with that tail with no white and the black spot at the base of the yellow bill, but as a birder who's never been within a 1000 miles of one, I could easily be wrong.
    7 points
  5. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/396647521 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/396647511
    6 points
  6. 6 points
  7. There’s a consensus here. 😉
    6 points
  8. Agreed. Also, no white border around the speculum
    6 points
  9. Definitely a Greater.
    6 points
  10. I’m leaning greater, but can’t see the nail that well. Any other photos? If not, I’ll leave this to the experts.
    6 points
  11. Today - the usual hybrids are the typical predominantly Mallard variety. This one has a more American Black Duck bias.
    5 points
  12. Okay, I am ready to see how bad I did.
    5 points
  13. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/396510911 Five? It's maybe a three from me.
    5 points
  14. I don’t think it’s identifiable to sex. It’s either a female or immature male. I don’t see anything unusual about the colors.
    5 points
  15. Where were the photos taken? It's definitely a House Finch.
    5 points
  16. I've never completed a Rubik's cube before. I have the intelligence of a lamp shade and much less of a attention span.
    4 points
  17. 4 points
  18. Pretty much what has already been said. Black Ducks are fairly common at this time of year, Chicago should be a similar environment to mine so Lake Michigan shoreline or inland water bodies, they are typically in pairs now and often found with groups of Mallards. Screech Owl - easiest to find a known location and just before sunset check the edges of the wooded area adjacent to open areas, they don't seem to wander far. If you know where a tree cavity nesting site is then they routinely look out at intervals during the day. They are not that common here and tough to find randomly. Eastern Meadowlark - more of a challenge both here and in the Chicago area (I just checked) at this time of year, but can be found. The others should be easy. Good luck.
    4 points
  19. I'm starting cross country skiing! I've never tried it before but it sounds like good aerobic exercise to me.
    4 points
  20. I don't know too much about Northern IL, but I have a feeling the first six on your list are gonna be pretty easy. American Black Duck- don't have any experience with them. Just check open bodies of water I guess. @RobinHood seems to see quite a few. Maybe he/she has some tips. Eastern Screech-Owls seem to vary in abundance from place to place. Check Merlin/eBird bar charts to see how common they are in that area. My best tips would probably be: 1. Check every tree cavity and crevice. There just may be a little round face peering back at you. 😁 Dead trees are especially good. 2. Learn their calls, and at night listen for them if you can. They seem to be vocal little birds. Look for an Eastern Meadowlark the same way you would a Western back home in Oregon. Scan open areas for them and listen for their songs/calls. Western Meadowlarks sing sometimes in the winter, and I have a hunch Easterns do too. Just my two cents. Good luck and have a fun trip!! Get lots of lifers!
    4 points
  21. You do know that taking the wrapping off isn't 'solving' it, right?
    4 points
  22. These are Gadwalls! Edit: Sniped!
    4 points
  23. You can’t really see the tail in the first photo. It’s behind the tree trunk. I think what you’re looking at is the UTC.
    4 points
  24. I'm also thinking Greater Scaup
    4 points
  25. The photos saturation is pumped way up
    4 points
  26. Henry flew off in a huff after losing a staring contest to Henrietta.
    4 points
  27. Northern Lapwing in Connecticut this afternoon https://ebird.org/checklist/S98968857 Here's hoping it flies down to DC for the Christmas Count on Saturday
    4 points
  28. Both Blue-winged. Separated from Green-winged by larger bill, white in front of face, no white triangle near the tail, and GISS.
    4 points
  29. HEEEEEEELP!!! My feets is stuck!!
    4 points
  30. Same, the only one I submitted with any confidence was #2. Chickadees are super hard, even with vocalizations they can be at best difficult to separate. I've tried to get a better grasp of them (Hoping to pull a Carolina in Michigan at some point), but they're just so dang similar. I could see 3 going either way...
    3 points
  31. Four lifers this morning. @Clip I got incredible photos of the birds! I can’t wait to upload these! https://ebird.org/checklist/S99000713
    3 points
  32. You've entered the glide path; landing gear down...
    3 points
  33. Field guide to Birds of North America. Found them but in the book the illustrations are not as gray as my images. Thanks to all the replied. First time I have seen and photographed them.
    3 points
  34. Cardinals and Blue Jays should be easy forest birds. Listen to Red-bellied Woodpecker calls before you go and they shouldn't be any problem either. Watch utility lines and other perches for Eastern Bluebirds, often in small groups scattered along the lines; the rusty breast usually catches my eye before the blue does, especially on cloudy days or in poor light. Have you checked eBird for what's been seen in the area lately?
    3 points
  35. @HamRHead There is no way, that I've ever heard of, to re-flatten a skillet. Collectors affectionately call them "spinners". Great camping skillets though. Lots of skillets are ruined by people who don't know what they are doing, tossing them in a fire to clean them--they crack, warp, or exhibit a red hue caused by fire damage. It's a shame because there is an finite supply of the oldies. There are much easier and less damaging ways to strip and clean them.
    3 points
  36. You're right, nevermind!
    3 points
  37. Yup, sorry. I fully intended to mention that, and yet in my haste forgot. I'm in northern NJ. ...So it *is* a House Finch, eh? An immature, I suppose? That could account for the different coloration from what I'm used to seeing on [adult] females.
    3 points
  38. 3 points
  39. 3 points
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