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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/22/2021 in all areas

  1. One from a couple of days ago. The only ratings were mine and I'm fairly sure a friend (tough county for photographers). https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/397197731
    14 points
  2. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/397937251
    12 points
  3. #686 Bat Falcon - Santa Ana NWR, Hidalgo County, TX (12/19/2021). (Don't think this one was on the list to take it off yet).
    11 points
  4. Please note, those birds are “true wilds” as opposed to the “established feral” population of south Florida. Both are ABA countable, but are distinctly separate populations, as the TX birds are from the wild native population in Mexico.
    7 points
  5. Chipping Sparrows all, I think. Let's wait for someone else to chime in first though, shall we?
    7 points
  6. Tough angle. I’d leave it as a Cooper’s/Sharp-shinned
    7 points
  7. I have one hotspot near me where all the birds are super tame, including these. here’s a shot I’ve gotten of them:
    6 points
  8. Certainly either Thayer's or Glaucous-winged x Herring. I think Glaucous-winged x Herring based on the head/neck smudging pattern. Although its tough to say for sure without seeing spread wing or getting a better sense of size relative to other gulls.
    6 points
  9. 6 points
  10. County bird White-winged Dove! Finally got it the third time we went. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/397805661 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/397805651
    6 points
  11. https://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/news/species-profiles/burrowing-owl-named-abas-2022-bird-of-the-year/
    5 points
  12. Now Muscovy Ducks are just one example of this, albeit probably the most interesting one. Other introduced exotics with established populations include: Mute Swan Egyptian Goose A bunch of parrot/parakeet species Scaly-breasted Munia Red-whiskered Bulbul and Red-vented Bulbul Pin-tailed Whydah Black-throated Magpie-Jay Spotted Dove Spot-breasted Oriole Eurasian Tree-Sparrow
    5 points
  13. We were hiking Sonoita Creek above Patagonia Lake in southern Arizona when this Green Heron flew off the creek and landed up in a tree in the forest about 20 feet off the ground.
    5 points
  14. I would like to apologize for making that comparison, and I hope I will be forgiven by the sparrows and starlings.
    5 points
  15. Eye color is another good note here. Cooper's have yellow eyes when young, and red as adults. This bird has brown eyes. *waves from two hours east*
    5 points
  16. The first bird can’t be a Thayer’s as it doesn’t have black primaries. The second bird is almost assuredly an Olympic Gull. It’s very dark, but at that stage a western wouldn’t have a completely black bill. Additionally, look at the shade of the primaries. They are the same tone as the rest of the bird, which rules out a pure WEGU.
    5 points
  17. Note the bulky body, rows of pale icicles on the wings, and larger number of bands on the tail, with the darker ones not being black.
    5 points
  18. This, though I would suggest Coop.
    5 points
  19. Bewick’s. The strong eye line rules out house wren.
    5 points
  20. Thank you for your submissions!! This week's birds are 1.) Carolina Chickadee, 2.) Black-capped Chickadee, and 3.) Sichuan Tit. The third one I added for tits and giggles so I won't run an analysis on that one, but Carolina and Black-capped Chickadee are best differentiated by the amount of white edging on the tertials, with Black-capped having much more. Hybrids exist, but I've never tried to differentiate them. Photo 1 was taken in Bell County, Texas. Photo 2 was taken in Maine by my buddy Fyn Kynd. Those who guessed Carolina Chickadee for one get 3 points, those who guessed Black-capped Chickadee for two get 3 points, and no points are awarded for three, since no one got it right anyway. Sex and age are not discernable so no additional points for those, sorry. Here is the FINAL SCOREBOARD of 2021. I think I owe some folks extra points from an error I made last week that I forgot to correct. _________________________________ 1. BirdingBoy, Kevin - 78 points 2. AidanB, Kerri - 69 points 3. meghann - 68 points 4. Avery, stitch58 - 66 points 5. Peromyscus - 60 points 6. PalmWarbler - 59 points 7. BirdNrd, SeanBirds, TheBirdNuts - 58 points 8. MichaelLong - 55 points 9. ConnorCochrane - 54 points 10. IKLland - 50 points 11. PaulK - 45 points 12. Quiscalusquiscula - 44 points 13. TrevorL - 42 points 14. DanP - 39 points 15. EdHogg - 37 points 16. SirVive - 28 points 17. Kansabirdguy - 24 points 18. Bird-Boys - 19 points _________________________________ Here is the December scoreboard: _________________________________ 1. BirdingBoy - 18 points 2. DanP, Kevin - 17 points 3. Avery, Kerri, meghann, PaulK, Peromyscus - 16 points 4. AidanB, PalmWarbler, Quiscalusquiscula, Seanbirds, stitch58 - 15 points 5. BirdNrd, MichaelLong, TrevorL - 14 points 6. SirVive - 13 points 7. IKLland - 10 points 8. EdHogg - 8 points _________________________________ Let me know if I missed you on the scoreboard or if I made any other errors. Thanks again for your submissions!
    4 points
  21. Truly wild Muscovy Ducks (i.e., from populations that have never been domesticated) have a very consistent phenotype. You can immediately tell they are different from the domestic birds, both in appearance and in behavior. For one, they are all dark with white only in the wings. The knobs on the face are generally black with little red warts on them. They can fly. Their bodies appear slimmer and less dumpy, with longer necks. The only place you can find these is in south Texas, on the Rio Grande and this is part of their natural range so they are not accidental. The best location for them is at Salineño, Texas, best seen at dawn flying down the river. Here are some examples: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/330135051 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/349754031 Domestic type Muscovy Ducks have more white in their plumage, typically on the head and neck and also the chest, but just like chickens and cows and dogs, their patterns can be very random and inconsistent. The knobs on the drake's face are usually bright red, as are the warts. They're dumpy and ugly with a dragging belly and a more upright posture and shorter neck. These have populations largely promoted by humans. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/133934711 The hens are a little daintier: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/169767811 Established feral Muscovy Ducks are just domestic variants that have escaped or been introduced to an area and established a breeding population on their own volition. Just like Rock Pigeons and House Sparrows they have self-perpetuating populations. These likely exist in many cities throughout the United States, but only in Florida have they established such a large self-perpetuating population that they are deemed fully established and countable by ABA standards, like Rock Pigeon and House Sparrow, etc.
    4 points
  22. 4 points
  23. Move along, buddy; I'm working this corner.
    4 points
  24. Welcome to Whatbird! You started with the most common bird (Red-tailed). Learning common birds is great, because you can use those as bases for comparison. You noticed enough differences to make you question whether this was indeed the expected species. You're off to an excellent start!
    4 points
  25. Your first photos are of an immature Red-shouldered hawk- note the brown streaking on the chest. The photos above appear to be of adult Red-shouldered hawk - note the reddish-orange barring on chest and bold black and white checkered pattern on the edge of wings
    4 points
  26. Very very jealous! Great Bird!
    4 points
  27. At 149 species this trip! I think 200 could seriously happen!
    4 points
  28. That's great! It is a good hobby to get into, you don't have to do any more than you want, you can do it your whole life, Etc. If you are really wanting to get serious you will probable enjoy eBird, also AllAboutBirds. https://ebird.org/explore https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/
    4 points
  29. 4 points
  30. Good yard bird for December. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/397286971
    4 points
  31. I'm just beginning my bird journey, identifying birds in my neighborhood here in Tulsa Oklahoma. Red-tailed hawks are supposedly super common around here. But I've seen a couple of hawks during my morning walks (Dec 2021) and they don't quite look like the red-tails pictures to me. To my amateur eyes, and those of my neighbor, they look like red-shouldered hawks. Could someone more experienced take a look at these pictures and tell me what they think? The first picture, atop the mailbox post, was taken about 2 weeks ago. The other 3 pictures were taken the day of this posting. Pictures 1 & 2 were taken in the same general area. Pictures 3 & 4 were taken in a different area about 800 feet away (straight line). I was practically underneath it, but couldn't get around to see the back because of where it was. PS How evocative is it to see a hawk juxtaposed by a recycling bin?!?! And it just sat there as we walked slowly by, not more than 10 feet across the street. Thanks so much. KLG
    3 points
  32. Taken on 12-20-2021 at Sepulveda Basin in the Haskell Creek floodplain, Van Nuys, CA. Would this be a Lincoln's Sparrow?
    3 points
  33. Correct. Since this is the first ABA record it wouldn't be on the ABA list yet which that spreadsheet is based on
    3 points
  34. 2021 wrapped up with the following clout points, based on our monthly winners: 1. Kevin, BirdingBoy - 5 clout points 2. meghann, TheBirdNuts - 3 clout points 3. AidanB, Avery, DanP, SeanBirds - 2 clout points 4. Kerri, PaulK, Peromyscus - 1 clout point
    3 points
  35. Another Northern Lapwing in Cumberland County, NEW JERSEY
    3 points
  36. Pretty good day today, though the birds weren't really cooperating (Six of the eight birds I chased didn't show). However, I did succeed in chasing a Black-throated Green Warbler and a Magnolia Warbler! Besides from those, I also got three other lifers (Red-masked Parakeet, Royal Tern, and Little Blue Heron). I also found several rarities, though they weren't really that rare. (Nashville Warbler and two Hermit Warblers). Also got a pair of Black Skimmers, which I had seen previously in California but didn't have on ebird, so I added one additional species to my state list. Overall, it was definitely a pretty good day even without the rarities cooperating. https://ebird.org/tripreport/21640
    3 points
  37. I read on one of the NJ groups today that there was a single sighting. Not sure where their info came from so can't vouch for it but sounds like it might be on the move again.
    3 points
  38. Very nice! I find it quite hard to get close for a good shot of these guys in my experience.
    3 points
  39. Northern Lapwing in Queen Anne's County, MARYLAND (there is much discussion about this not being the same bird seen further north. Looks like there might be multiple birds on the east coast, which is great news for us eastern seaboard peeps. Last time there was an invasion we even got one here in Georgia. Fingers crossed!) Yellow-billed Loon in Union County, NEW MEXICO
    3 points
  40. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/397509131 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/397509141
    3 points
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