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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/07/2022 in all areas

  1. I'm inclined to call that a Ring-billed
    7 points
  2. I was going through some older photos and found this sunrise from Dec 2020, nothing stellar but I like it.
    6 points
  3. The hawk is a Cooper's. Streaking is relatively clean and narrow and the tail feathers are significantly graduated. Plus it has a Coop's elongated, flat head.
    6 points
  4. We’ve started a digital art unit with iPad Pros in my art class at school. I’ve never done digital art before so there’s a lot of technical stuff I need to figure out with the software, and I actually found it to be pretty frustrating. I definitely prefer pencil and paper! Today’s assignment was to draw my most prized possession, so I drew my camera since it’s the most expensive thing I’ve ever bought with my own money.
    6 points
  5. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/403047321 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/403046591
    6 points
  6. 6 points
  7. White-Crowned & Black-Throated Sparrow.
    5 points
  8. If you're willing to drop a couple grand, I'd go DSLR.
    5 points
  9. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/403181951 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/403181941 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/403181931
    5 points
  10. Its a female junco and imo not enough to ID to subspecies. Too ambiguous
    5 points
  11. Pine Grosbeak Sharp-tailed Grouse White-winged Crossbill
    5 points
  12. This osprey was probably more than 200 yards away and the sun was somewhat behind it so the light was harsh. Despite those things I was happy how the pic turned out.
    5 points
  13. I would call all Greaters.
    5 points
  14. Finally took some Cedar Waxwing photos I'm happy with! This one local park always gets decent numbers of them mid winter, but this is the first time I've tried them with my DSLR. https://ebird.org/checklist/S100116678
    5 points
  15. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/403303481 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/403303491
    4 points
  16. It's a Pine Warbler. The wing bars are hidden behind the branch in the first shot, but are partially visible in the second. Sometimes wing bars can be obscured by the side feathers, depending on how the bird is fluffed up. Incidentally, don't forget to include the location when you post a new ID request. Thanks!
    4 points
  17. 4 points
  18. Sounds like a Wilson's Warbler not a Song Sparrow so it's Pacific Wren
    4 points
  19. Tail feather length is a supporting ID mark, never the one to rely on. Overall size, bug eyed look, and the dark nape make this a Sharpie, no matter what the tail looks like.
    4 points
  20. The audio isn’t working on my device. Can anyone hear it?
    4 points
  21. And that fact wasn't even discovered until the mid 1970s
    4 points
  22. I thought that last one was going to be fairly easy. I hope this next one is much easier. Challenge: A photo containing at least 2 different species whose common names start with a hyphenated descriptor that is composed of first a color and second a body part. E.g. -- Black-throated ??? and Ruby-crowned ???
    4 points
  23. Mine today was the Marbled Murrelets nest IN TREES, sometimes 50 miles inland! ?
    4 points
  24. From Florida https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/402812381
    4 points
  25. From the family property back in May. I revisited these photos I took but never uploaded, and uh, did I photograph a Yellow, or Eastern Palm Warbler without realizing it? Would be pretty rare, only 12 or so accepted state records afaik. I’m thinking the extensive bright yellow going all the way down to the belly, the rufous streaking, and somewhat noticeable green wash on the nape and back all point towards a Yellow Palm. Hard to find resources on this however, so more opinions would be great! Thanks in advance. Really wishing I had noticed back then.
    3 points
  26. it is definitely worthy of submission to the MBRC. Let them decide it. I had one that was barely rejected (3-4). Here is the write up on why.
    3 points
  27. Ah well, thanks! I’ll see what my reviewer says. I’m in way to far to back out now with my addiction to identifying subspecies ?
    3 points
  28. You get tame Ruddy Ducks in Cali too?!?! Ahhh - nice shots ?
    3 points
  29. After further research, I would actually say yes to Eastern Palm. The yellow goes all the way through the supercilium and is more extensively washed over the body than in a Western. Nice find!
    3 points
  30. In the west, the other bird this one is most likely to be confused with is a Short-billed Gull. It’s not one due to less streaking on the head, particularly the back of the head and nape. Additionally, the bird is molting and its tertials are rather messy looking, whereas a Short-billed Gull’s would appear neater. In better lighting, beak structure and color can also be useful. These are a few of the notions that point to RBGU. The bird doesn’t have a light eye or yellow legs because it’s not an adult. It’s a 1cy. RBGU. With gulls it’s often best to age the bird before you ID it. This helps narrow down your options.
    3 points
  31. It's a rather flat-headed Sharpie - immature with orange, blotchy streaking, pale eyebrows, no angry brow ridges, even tail feathers.
    3 points
  32. Sedona, Arizona Cathedral Rock
    3 points
  33. It's a House. Some House can show somewhat of an eyeline like this. Notice the thin streaking. Also fwiw I can't ID the accipiter from these photos. Maybe if we lightened the photo up and I was able to see the face
    3 points
  34. Uh oh……. Hybrid?? hhhhhhhhhheeeeeeeeeeeeellllllllllllllpppppppppp mmmmmmmeeeeeee
    3 points
  35. Same, I’m getting an error message.
    3 points
  36. It looks like there was a sighting Jan 4 in town. Thanks again.
    3 points
  37. You are correct, this is a Sharp-shinned Hawk. Note the dark nape (hooded appearance). Nice photos!
    3 points
  38. 3 points
  39. New Zealand, South Island, Fiordland, Milford Sound
    3 points
  40. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/402639231 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/402639241
    3 points
  41. I'm not big on subspecies IDs but Yellow vs. Western is one I can differentiate with the naked eye, as long as we're talking mature birds. And with them here for the winter, I get to see them regularly.
    2 points
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