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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/26/2022 in all areas

  1. I did mine in acrylic paint markers this time. Second time I've used them. They were a bit thick for this 5x5 canvas...
    11 points
  2. OK folks! This is NOT the place to discuss and criticize other poster's behavior (please review the rules, especially #1 and #3). I've hidden all posts related to the discussion of a specific member in this thread (although not all of them necessarily break the rules). Keep in mind that we never really know why a member chooses to participate in the forums or not; and it's actually none of our business. Anyone here is free not to post or to leave the forum for any reason. Hashing out our opinions as to why someone may not be posting anymore is useless and should never happen in the forums. (It is, of course, always appropriate to privately consider whether your own posts may have contributed to a problem or someone feeling uncomfortable, and use that as a learning experience.)
    10 points
  3. Not a lot of action today, but I had the patience to wait for this Turkey Vulture to turn its head: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/419915401
    10 points
  4. Bird seen in Southern California at a lake catching bugs. Thought it was a female Tree Swallow but it does not seem to fit.
    9 points
  5. Looks like a Northern Rough-winged Swallow to me.
    8 points
  6. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/419915731
    8 points
  7. Trumpeters. Thick black loral skin and the forehead comes down to a “V” at the bill.
    7 points
  8. Behaviour should always trump a photo, as a lot of things can be changed by the camera based on the lighting, motion, and so on. Behaviour I think is one of the most underused ID skills and I find posts on here a lot of the time wouldn’t need to be made (or at least be a lot more narrowed down) if people just paid attention to what the bird was doing (was it pumping it’s tail, returning to the same perch, soaring, etc.) and applied that to what the bird looked like. My favourite is crow vs raven as yes they look similar, but they’re so easy to tell apart just based on behavioural quirks they have that usually show themselves within a minute or two. It seems very unlikely that a flycatcher would suddenly appear in the exact same spot a blue-gray gnatcatcher was a few moments later…. I deal with Hammonds and Dusky, often in the same checklist during the spring/early summer, but I rely on them to be calling. Though, I’ve never found/heard a Hammonds in the open section of habitat (sparse young trees, mostly shrub dominated) where the Duskies usually are and similarly have never found/heard a Dusky in the deep woods where the Hammonds usually are. Though I doubt that’s reliable. I think you’d need a picture showing the primary projection to be able to tell them apart.
    7 points
  9. Finally managed to get yard bird #100 with a small flock of Canvasbacks flying over! Never expected to get that many birds in a suburban neighbourhood, but flyovers can be crazy sometimes. https://ebird.org/checklist/S103697302
    7 points
  10. Haha until you’re dealing with confusing dull fall warblers way up in a tree. Gulls are big and will sit there and let you study them. That 5 inch Baypoll 50 feet up in a tree isn’t gonna sit there and let you study it…
    6 points
  11. Looking at this BGGN from AAB, I notice it has a longer bill than the original subject bird, a bill that is solid black compared to the original bird's pale bill. I also notice in all of the BGGN photos on the AAB page, the contrast between the darker head and lighter throat is stronger than on the originally posted bird. I won't say what the original is, but I don't think it's a Blue-gray.
    6 points
  12. My knowledge of some calls came in handy as I recognized the RSH call and walked right over to the bird: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/420149781
    5 points
  13. Yes, it’s a Common Merganser.
    5 points
  14. Pale-striped Poison Dart Frog After doing some research later, I'm very glad I had the sense not to touch this tiny frog. It is from a family of very poisonous frogs. It's 'cousin' the Golden Poison Dart Frog, on average is generally estimated to contain about one milligram of poison, enough to kill between 10 to 20 humans, or up to two African bull elephants! --source: Wikipedia-- https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/107477451
    5 points
  15. Spix's Night Monkeys https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/107477447
    5 points
  16. My go to from now on is “Maybe it is a hybrid”.
    5 points
  17. Savannah Sparrow and Palm Warbler.
    5 points
  18. I believe that it is a Common Grackle
    5 points
  19. Also note the dark cap that contrasts with the lighter nape. Wide band of white on the tail. I think its a hard photo to look for difference in tail feather length though, that is better for coops at rest on a perch.
    4 points
  20. Thanks! You’ll get one. No rush. You still have so many new and exciting birds ahead of you. Savor each one.
    4 points
  21. My point was that photos are not always reliable and the be all and end all of bird identification. If there was no photo, and we simply went by the description of the bird and its behaviour it would have been narrowed down to a flycatcher right away. Having said that, the general consensus shifted towards Hammonds/dusky even before the behaviour was mentioned. Then if you look at the second photo, that appears to be the exact same bundle of branches in the original photo. So it seems much safer to ID this as Hammonds/dusky than blue-gray based on the combination of photos, behaviour, and the memory of the encounter. That being said, I don’t think it matters too much in the grand scheme of things if a single blue-gray gnatcatcher is misidentified as a dusky/Hammonds or vice versa. Perhaps if it was a rare bird or an endangered species it would matter more to fight for one ID over the other.
    4 points
  22. We used PICNIC, problem in chair,not in computer
    4 points
  23. I click on the next thread button as quickly as possible. ?
    4 points
  24. Given the challenges that come with raptor ID, and since we cant see this birds primaries, tail, underwing, etc, I do think this is a juv. RTHA. It's definitely not a SWHA, and RSHA is ruled out by range alone. RTHAs are notoriously variable, and juvs can be quite a challenge.
    4 points
  25. 709. La Sagra’s Flycatcher Flycatcher 710. Western Spindalis
    4 points
  26. Thank you! And thanks so much for the welcome! Getting out my color pencils!
    4 points
  27. I agree with intersex Mallard. Nothing suggests a hybrid or domestic genes to me and male Mallards don't develop a female-like bill when they're molting.
    3 points
  28. I'm also leaning Greater Scaup for the first individual and Lesser for the rest
    3 points
  29. I think 1 could be a Greater, with that rounded head and maybe a larger black nail on its beak. Wait for more opinions though. I agree with Lesser Scaup for the rest.
    3 points
  30. Those are extremely tough to photograph! Awesome photos!
    3 points
  31. The photo could have been taken anywhere.
    3 points
  32. I don't think we can narrow these birds down to the species
    3 points
  33. Love this, love the style!
    3 points
  34. Me when I see gulls, flycatchers, eastern warblers...
    3 points
  35. Hepatic tanager. Initially I thought this was one of the ant-tangers, but that’s a very hefty bill.
    3 points
  36. Lots of reasons, some of which are easily explained, and some of which are a little more how the birds “feels” once you have seen many of both species. First, SWHAs almost always have some light patches in the chin or above the cere. IMO, SWHAs can also appear flat headed compared to the rounded crown looks of RTHAs. Additionally, in my experience, juv SHAs almost never have piercing yellow eyes, instead appearing more of an ochre. Here are a few examples of juv. SWHA. Compare to the bird in question. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/264439481 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/66214521
    3 points
  37. These look to big and chunky. Also the tails on Rose-ringed Parakeets normally narrow down to 1 or 2 feathers trailing out the back. Macaw tails are thicker like these. See the links. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/182088681 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/345944601
    3 points
  38. Mommy, the bad birder is scaring me! Make it go away!!
    3 points
  39. He saw the bird one a perch, and photographed it. Then the same bird kept flying back to the same perch.
    3 points
  40. Why? The behavior, bill shape, and structure all point to flycatcher. Blue gray gnatcatchers never behave the way @Tanager 101 described.
    3 points
  41. Black-fronted Nunbird https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/419800881
    3 points
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