Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/16/2022 in all areas

  1. Best in flight shot I've ever taken! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/425537351
    13 points
  2. Hard to choose but this is probably my favorite https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/425564361
    9 points
  3. From the neighborhood today https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/425518181
    8 points
  4. Regarding head shape as well, even without an apparent feather-made peak being visible during observation (such as when the bird is actively diving/foraging) you want to see the apex (or the sharpest) part of the curve in the top of the head (in profile view) to appear to be at or perhaps even a bit in front of the eye (toward the bill) in my somewhat limited experience (I'm much better at finding Lessers than Greaters in my efforts in Texas so far to be sure). Your second photo, while perhaps not showing a distinctive peak, certainly shows this 'apex' I'm talking about being located near the back/left portion of the profile curve of the head, whereas we're wanting to see it at the front/right (toward the bill) portion of the head for the Greater, if that makes any sense. Here's a pic of one from Round Rock, TX earlier this year that I hope shows better what I'm talking about than my words can express...it's like the head peaks above/in front of the eye, and then it's all downhill from there...
    7 points
  5. I'm from BC so we don't see foxes in trees, just bears. Thanks for adding the fox photo and for the laugh.
    7 points
  6. I'd go lesser for the head sheen (yes I know it isn't completely reliable) and especially in the second photo you can see the head peak.
    7 points
  7. Thanks to the help of this forum, I've id'd this caramel crow. Never knew they came in different flavors! Thanks for those who helped me out with this.
    6 points
  8. All taken today at Chippewa Nature Center
    6 points
  9. In my experience, Thrashers normally repeat phrases twice, while Mockingbirds repeat 3 or more times. Also, Mockingbirds are known to sing all night. I would call that a NOMO.
    5 points
  10. Haha it’s in the interior of BC! Lots of good mountain birds there.
    5 points
  11. Thanks for the info! This is a pretty neat article about them HERE. They're sometimes referred to as brown crows or caramel crows.
    5 points
  12. I may have posted this before but I'm old and involved in other forums so forgive me. I was birding in Cuba and at the time working with my fantastic guide that was doing his best to hook me up with a Pygmy Owl we could hear but not see in the thick short trees and brush. He finally gave up and walked away. After a bit, I started to try to catch up to him when I hear a flutter right behind me. I turn and not 5 feet away is this Cuban Pygmy Owl posing like "oaky, here I am".
    4 points
  13. This Sandhill Crane was in (I think, some sort of fast food) a Burger king parking lot and in the grasses in front. Got great looks and was fine with us walking within 5 feet of it. It was rainy and cloudy. Had it been sunny I could have gotten amazing photos.....
    4 points
  14. This hummingbird was posed nicely for a bit.
    4 points
  15. Don't tell me that! *sobs quietly in the corner*
    4 points
  16. I think the "at night" is the perfect MO for a NOMO.
    4 points
  17. Sounds perfect for a Northern Mockingbird.
    4 points
  18. haha I don't even see bears. All I have is a porcupine that moved one tree over in the span of 12 hours. And I though sloths were slow......
    4 points
  19. There is not a lens long enough for me to hang around to get shots of Mama, up a tree or not.
    4 points
  20. hmmm I'll see when I can get there.......
    4 points
  21. More Nanday Parakeets on the way. 🙂 I also had the good fortune to watch the flock fly over to the wire to perch. This cleared up some frustration, as I see these birds in flight all of the time, but crappy lighting conditions have always hidden the colors and I had no idea what they were as I hadn't been able to capture any pics. Now that I know the flighted wing pattern and shape of the birds, I'll be getting more IDs. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/425519361
    4 points
  22. No, no, THIS is a fox in a tree!
    4 points
  23. Located in the DFW metro area….3/16/22…
    3 points
  24. Correct, the first is a Red-shouldered and the second is a Red-tailed.
    3 points
  25. There’s no bird as cooperative as a gull.
    3 points
  26. Guess I gotta touch up on my sparrows 😬
    3 points
  27. Haha I thought Savannah too. The more experienced people were saying Vesper's so I thought I was wrong because I have been many times in the past...So I just didn't post.
    3 points
  28. I agree with Savannah Sparrow. It’s pretty pale, making the eyeing appear not that distinct.
    3 points
  29. Like a dog sniffing out a squirrel 😆
    3 points
  30. Not my photo, but this is worth sharing. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/425510611
    3 points
  31. I broke down and gave into my weakness last night and ordered the Canon R6 with the RF 100-500mm f/4.5-7.1L. My hope is that the 100-500 mirrorless lens performs as well as the 100-400mm mark ii did, with the added reach. As great as the 100-400ii is, and as much as I loved using it, the desire for more reach was always there. It really didn't make sense to me dollar wise to invest in the 100-400 when the 100-500 isn't all that much more expensive given the added reach. When it came to deciding between the R6 and the R5, well I decided that my skill level didn't justify the price jump needed to buy the R5. This way I still have a bit of wiggle room and can say that I should have bought the R5 instead of the R6 everytime I botch a photo. 😁 Just sharing my thought process, I'll share some photos when the new setup arrives.
    3 points
  32. In Georgia I would say either Northern Mockingbird or Brown Thrasher. I thought maybe the number of times a phrase was repeated pointed to one or the other, but I can't find anything online about that. Nocturnal might be a clue, but but I'm not completely sure. I do know that Northern Mockingbirds will sing all night.
    3 points
  33. Yes Trumpeter Swan. Good job everyone! https://ebird.org/checklist/S91445743 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/353067801
    3 points
  34. At 54:20 this reviewer walks through the review process. I noticed one of the entries shows deferred.
    3 points
  35. Because of this Ring-billed Gull I now carry wire cutters and scissors in my car at all times just in case I ever run into this kind of situation again. Yes the last photo is the bird being released after removing not just one but two sets of two three pronged hooks that were stuck to the bird. It was also tangled in fishing line not visible in the photos.
    3 points
  36. You could keep it inclusive by doing it more by groups rather than individual species. Like your best photo of a Swan, or best photo of a diving duck. Or your best...thrasher, thrush, finch. Just a thought. Plus those that have less common birds can share those too.
    3 points
  37. @Seanbirdsis this a Penisula Ribbon Snake? Photo taken yesterday in Southern Georgia.
    3 points
  38. Quick stop at my patch while burning time before a swim meet https://ebird.org/checklist/S104896710
    3 points
  39. I recently started seeing a white bird flying around with the crows in my neighborhood, but every time I reach for my camera, it disappears. Finally snapped a couple photos, is this just another crow and I've been oblivious to the fact that white ones, or at least non black ones are common? I live in eastern Washington, it hangs out with the other crows, is the same size as the others and squawks and caws just like them too. Any help would be appreciated.
    3 points
  40. What a cool bird! It’s a crow alright, but has some color deformity. I don’t know if this would be called leucism, or a different chromatic aberration
    3 points
  41. The deep reddish brown in the face, flanks, wings, and tail, along with heavily streaked mantle…contrasting with the mix of slate gray and red on the face, crown, and nape rule out the other Fox Sparrow ssp.
    2 points
  42. There's been speculation that it's a bird previously seen elsewhere. Also, Redwing in St. John's, NEWFOUNDLAND
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...