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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/22/2022 in all areas

  1. 9 points
  2. I don't think this is Hermit. I feel like the rump isn't red enough, plus looking at ebird, it looks like Hermit Thrush start showing up in this area at the very end of October or even early November most years. I'd guess this is a Veery, that's the most common thrush in that area at this time of year. Swainson's is much more uncommon, plus this bird is more reddish than an Olive-backed Swainson's should be IMO. The eyering seems weak from what I can see as well.
    7 points
  3. Ratings would be greatly appreciated on this photo. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/486400121
    6 points
  4. 5 points
  5. Red-shouldered. Pale bars on the secondaries, plus GISS, and red shoulders!
    5 points
  6. It’s smaller than the ringers… I think the small bill and relative size make this a Franklin’s
    5 points
  7. 5 points
  8. Looks like a Coop to me. Those thick streaks along the breast plus the GISS of this bird makes it feel like a Coop to me.
    5 points
  9. This is a Common Yellowthroat. The tail's too long for an Orange-crowned.
    4 points
  10. Pretty much annual in NJ, first time I've seen a pair though.
    4 points
  11. 4 points
  12. 4 points
  13. Chestnut-sided Warbler at Bette Davis Picnic Area in Glendale, CA
    4 points
  14. It's a Western Sandpiper, nothing besides a Dunlin would have a bill that long, and it's early for that species.
    4 points
  15. It's a Yellow Warbler. Undertail pattern is all that you need to identify this bird.
    4 points
  16. Yes, that eyering and J shaped articular is a good way to tell.
    4 points
  17. Yep, I see a redstart. The photo quality is so bad I can't tell which way it's looking and where its beak is, but I can see a pale belly, a wing with a yellow wingbar, a black-tipped yellow tail, gray head, greenish back, and two dark legs.
    3 points
  18. I think someone uploaded the wrong photo of a Canada Warbler on ebird ? https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/486411081
    3 points
  19. #2 is a Yellow Warbler. Could we please have the date and location for the hummingbirds?
    3 points
  20. ... ... ... ... ... Sorry, ... laughed, ... so hard ... I ran out of breath on that one... No, I picked it because it best demonstrated the true colors under more 'normal' light. This one is. Lockwood Folly, Brunswick County, SE NC; June '21. I saw my first Trike at this same location, although this bird isn't it. I can't turn around over there without tripping over one.
    3 points
  21. Yeah, not sure what they're trying to attract!
    3 points
  22. @kjsmith, it's a Trike for all the reasons you gave (nice breakdown!). The angle of the sunlight is playing games with the reddish and bluish parts. See this one from Macaulay:
    3 points
  23. Veery for me. Grayish streaky cheek and solidly red upperparts.
    3 points
  24. . . . . . Slow and right over the middle of the plate ...
    3 points
  25. Can we rule out the South end of a North-bound bird from these photos?
    3 points
  26. birdie ? #125: ?⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    3 points
  27. I think GISS was used in WW1 to try to identify friendly or foe aircraft.
    3 points
  28. Ratings on these would be appreciated. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/486294331 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/486294951
    3 points
  29. GISS is "general impression, size, and shape" or "general impression of shape and size" or something. It was probably invented to explain the older term "jizz", the qualities of a bird that you can't put into words but help you identify it. Or to replace "jizz", a term some people aren't comfortable with.
    3 points
  30. I don't think this is identifiable, I'm not even convinced it's an accipiter. Looks more like a Buteo to me.
    3 points
  31. 3 points
  32. This is a Pewee. The vest is pretty dark, but the edge of the vest is diffuse. In the linked thread, the hard edge to the vest is evident.
    3 points
  33. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/486130481
    3 points
  34. It's a Wilson's Warbler. Glad to help.
    3 points
  35. I think the camera quality is making it look weird. I doubt someone would go through the trouble to try to fake a “common” sighting, though there are crazy people. I agree with redstart
    2 points
  36. birdie ? #125: ?⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ Another easy one. ?
    2 points
  37. I've heard that, but I've looked for evidence and haven't found any, and so have other people. Other way around, I suspect--one's a word of unknown origin, the other is an acronym made up to explain it. An interesting thing about that experience from a birding point of view is that people do sometimes put a name to it. For instance, the Cooper's Hawk's "mean expression", compared to a Sharp-shinned Hawk, comes from its heavier brow ridge and its smaller eye in proportion to its head. But still, experienced birders can recognize a bird before any words have had a chance to go through their mind.
    2 points
  38. Pac-slope. Some juvs can be paler below.
    2 points
  39. I agree with Coop. The bill is relatively big and the top continues the line of the bill more or less smoothly--the bill doesn't jut out from the face. Also the legs are substantial--no sharp shins here. I believe a Sharpie would also have more rufous streaking.
    2 points
  40. 2 points
  41. Hooded Warblers are adorable even without the hood. :) https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/486032941
    2 points
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