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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/27/2023 in all areas

  1. Super happy with this Pine Grosbeak shot from earlier in the month! Now if I could just find a male at eye level on a nice perch... ML528485661 Pine Grosbeak Macaulay Library
    14 points
  2. I got a bunch of lifers recently! Red Phalarope Scripps’s Murrelet Cassin’s Auklet Defeated my biggest nemesis, Bonaparte’s Gull Rhinoceros Auklet Brown Booby Black-legged Kittiwake Red-billed Tropicbird(!) Nazca Booby Buller’s Shearwater And an Orchard Oriole from this morning—photos coming tomorrow.
    9 points
  3. My ears are burning! Such language from a bird!
    7 points
  4. Snow Goose. It seems funny that I had to go all the way to Baja, Mexico to see a Snow Goose for the first time.
    7 points
  5. Pine Warbler on a rainy day: Ratings always appreciated. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/528750821
    6 points
  6. Those streaks are darker and less rufous than is typical for Sharpie. And "thin" probably isn't the right word. The people at the Raptor ID group on Facebook say "teardrop-shaped" for Cooper's, meaning exactly what your bird has--feathers with a dark spot and a dark shaft.
    6 points
  7. If you're referring to your reports not getting accepted, one suggestion I have is to wait to enter a sighting into ebird before you are sure about the ID. A lot of your posts on the forums have about a seemingly rare bird which you are uncertain on the exact ID. I've noticed you upload media (wether photo or audio) under the rare species on eBird before you get the the photos/audio confirmed. Posting these records on ebird before you are certain of what it is could leave a bad taste in a local reviews mouth. Seeing constant reports of rarities which are quickly changed could make you appear like you have less knowledge about the birds than you actually do, and could lead to the reviewer trusting you less. eBird has many slashes and spurs on the website that can and should be used if you are uncertain about an ID. Also, like Derek said a few posts back, audio can go a long way, I'd just recommend leaving the recording running for at least 20 seconds or so. It's a lot easier to confirm a bird from a recording if you can hear multiple calls which are at least slightly spread out. It's often impossible to ID a bird from a short one or two second long recording, as the calls blend into the background noise.
    6 points
  8. I have to say, while it is no doubt a lost art, the landscape surrounding written descriptions has changed drastically in the almost 20 years since Tony wrote this article. First and foremost, technology has accelerated exponentially. In 2004 cell phones didn't have cameras, DSLRs were literal dinosaurs compared to today's mirrorless spaceships, and half the people on this forum weren't even born; but that's beside the point. Another crucial change is that information about birds has become extremely accessible, perhaps too accessible. I know of cases where highly inexperienced observers, or even worse, observes who are known to falsify sightings, write up picture perfect field guide descriptions of what they saw. They simply checked a few field guides, opened up Birds of the World, and voila! So, the old adage is still true...a picture is worth a thousand words. This is especially true when reviewers are reviewing hundreds or thousands of sightings in a year. It's just so much easier to interpret a photo than it is a written description. Just think about all the treads on here where someone writes what they saw and an ID is never landed on, versus the number of photos that are put up here and are accurately ID'ed.
    6 points
  9. I still can't believe you got that shot! I was using burst and literally every single shot had a twig in the way.
    6 points
  10. I can tell you quite confidently, as someone on the my State Records Committee, that it is likely that none of the OP’s example sightings would be accepted if they were submitted to us for scrutiny. Even sightings by experienced birders, with a decent written description, but no photos or audio will often not be accepted. Even the smallest contradictory detail or field mark that isn’t correct can be enough to disqualify. With a species that only has a few records in the state, (like the OP’s Kiskadee), the bar is very high for acceptance. It isn’t personal and just because a bird isn’t accepted by “officials,” it doesn’t mean that they don’t believe you or that you didn’t see the bird. It simply means that the sighting wasn’t well-documented enough to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the identification was accurate.
    5 points
  11. This is a long post, but a couple of things stand out. Do you have a cell phone, a camera? Even most old phones have the ability to capture audio. This can go a long way in getting a record approved. Keep in mind that part of gaining a reputation as a reliable birder is by letting things go from time to time. Some of what you describe should fall into that category, IMO. I don't know the exact situations here beyond what you have provided, but situations such as... - A heard only Burrowing Owl not ID'ed in the field? BUOW are diurnal and live in large, open fields and agricultural areas. They are generally not hard to see if you give some effort in the right habitat/location. Why submit it as heard only? Why not go back and try to get a visual? - Calling a Henslow's Sparrow on a single call, heard once is... I am not sure I would call even known, common, everyday species, if I heard a single note only once. Maybe really obvious things, but there is simply way too much variation in bird vocalizations to utilize this practice. Also, FWIW, a second state record based upon a submission from an observer's yard without photos or audio is unlikely to pass muster amongst most/all states' Bird Records Committee. Something as significant as a second state record should be scrutinized very closely (for good reason), and sufficient documentation is critical. There are many experienced and "expert" birders who would not likely get such a record accepted. Lastly, you don't have to be on eBird. It's a choice, and there are guidelines and expectations that come with that choice. If you are finding yourself at odds with the processes and people involved with those processes, maybe it's time to give it a break? If it is causing you stress, anxiety, or negative feelings, I would definitely recommend taking a step back.
    5 points
  12. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/528469111
    5 points
  13. Thrasher, Brown https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/525880831
    4 points
  14. Then no 'buts'. I was in Houston in December, and saw a woodpecker. I initially thought it was a Red-bellied but the GISS was off. I did a bit of digging and found Golden-fronted weren't uncommon the next county over. I listed it and the reasons why I thought it wasn't a Red-bellied. The review contacted me later that day to say GFWO would be a first for Harris County, and he'd need better documentation to accept it. (He even offered to drive to the location himself if time permitted!) I replied the description was all I had, I had no photos, and marked up a screen shot showing the exact location if he has the time. I also said I understood completely why he couldn't accept it. I saw it, it's on my list, and I don't care if anyone else can see it. No 'buts'. I don't know how to determine how fast other people's IDs are accepted. It's never been something I've been interested in. I don't care what others have on their lists or what they have accepted. Your concerns are what I'm talking about when I say I don't care about my reputation. More specifically, I don't care about doing anything to build it. I try to not have any behaviors that may pull it down. If I wind up with a decent one as a result, fine; if not, it's not going to affect my enjoyment.
    4 points
  15. Yes, it's a Hermit Thrush, the only spotted thrush likely to be in North America in winter.
    4 points
  16. I was responding to @Birds are cool's post above. He posts eBird links on all of his posts. I have no reason to look up any particular person on eBird unless they're posting their photos/audio on the forums via eBird.
    4 points
  17. Here’s another little thing that I’ve found helps to grow your reputation as a birder. Basically, to sum it up, I’ve found that now that I’ve been in contact with a few of the birders in my county, I feel like they have gotten to know more/better, which leads them to trust me, especially when they’re in the field. I’ve also been on two pelagic trips, and on both trips, one of my main reviewers was on it. I got to talk to him a lot, and I even managed to spot a Brown Booby and point it out to him, and I also showed him a photo of a 1cy Bonaparte’s Gull which I thought might have been a kittiwake, but I didn’t call it one. I simply just showed him the photo, and(especially since I’m young), he appreciated that didnt jump to conclusions. So what I’m trying to say is, if possible, being in contact with some of the top birders in your area appears to (at least in my county), help grow your reputation as a good birder. Another thing that would help even more to gain the reviewers and other peoples trust is to go out birding with some of the top birders in the county. I’ve done this once or twice, and when we submitted a rarity(we didn’t share checklists), my alert came in first and was accepted before I added photos.
    4 points
  18. A few more things on the potential Kiskadee just to try to put you into the heads of a records committee. It isn’t enough to say the “call was a perfect match.” A detailed description of the call is necessary. Describe the viewing conditions. Distance? Duration of sighting? Do you have any experience with Kiskadees? Did you immediately identify it as such or did you consult an external source? “Brown back, BRIGHT yellow belly/breast, and black and white head.” Most importantly, this description is very much lacking (I don’t know what you actually submitted to the records committee). The first thing that is obvious is the complete lack of analysis of size and shape. Color is often misleading in the field. If I was voting with the given information, I would be worried that no mention of the bill size was made, as a Kiskadee’s honker of a bill is its most prominent feature and should stand out to the viewer.
    4 points
  19. If you don’t have photos and /or audio(or even if you do), the written description is INCREDIBLY important. I’d suggest reading this fantastic article by @Tony Leukering, and if you still have questions, then come back and ask. https://cobrc.org/Articles/writingbirddescriptions_leukering.pdf
    4 points
  20. Eastern Phoebe: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/528495771
    4 points
  21. Nice. Aim for 140! I am stuck at 109, going to try for 110 with an owl tonight.
    4 points
  22. A short outing today puts me at 187 for the year, 186 ABA countable, 143 for California, and 138 for my county.
    4 points
  23. Man! It wasn't all that long ago that I was getting lifers on pelagics like that! Looks like it was a great trip! In particular, congrats on the Red-billed Tropicbird! That's a great bird! I really need to get on one of those SoCal pelagics!
    3 points
  24. 2 year birds and 13 Bobwhite!!!!!!! 7 mile run with my mother. https://ebird.org/checklist/S127028488
    3 points
  25. I think @Kevin or @aveschapinas should lock this. As @millipede said: it’s just a venting post, not an entire discussion.
    3 points
  26. I didn't see anything critical in the responses but that's in the eye of the beholder. I usually try to have your back but if you don't want responses, consider venting somewhere other than a public forum. The mods can lock or delete this for you.
    3 points
  27. 3 points
  28. Yeah, I only got off a couple shots that didn't have that branch. I had maybe a 5 second opening when it moved onto a clearer perch.
    3 points
  29. Easily this checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S126961181 I made 7 checklists today, and saw a decent amount of birds on each, but this one was by far the best. Photo lifer PIWA and 23 species! I have not seen a YRWA in 5 days, so it was nice to see three of them. I found a really good spot for photography and birding also!
    3 points
  30. Photo lifer PIWA that I got amazing looks at IMM and adults.
    3 points
  31. The Townsend’s Warbler that flew into my classroom.
    3 points
  32. 3 points
  33. @Connor Cochranequoted @Birds are cool’s post. He wasn’t saying this about you, he was saying it about @Birds are cool.
    2 points
  34. birdie 🦃 #252: 🟥🟥🟥🟥🟨🟨 https://birdiegame.net/
    2 points
  35. I'm far from an expert, but if I saw this bird up here in Oregonland I'd think it had some slate-coloured/cismontanus genes with the dark back and grey on the flanks, but would still call it an Oregon because it's not dark enough to be predominantly other. I don't know how to make this call down by you.
    2 points
  36. I've followed the local sightings frequently enough that I can tell who is visiting from out-of-state and using that app to legitimize their reports. The filter for Las Vegas includes a huge variety of habitats, and sometimes you'll see a non-local report an alpine bird in the middle of the desert without getting caught in the filter. Even if they don't add a description of "ID'd by Merlin," it's clear that's how it got on their list. In fact, there's a probably-incorrect "ID'd by Merlin" sparrow on the county Rare Bird Alert now, but I'm not going into detail to respect their privacy.
    2 points
  37. The main one - https://ebird.org/checklist/S126985057 https://ebird.org/checklist/S126987155 https://ebird.org/checklist/S126988157
    2 points
  38. Don't feel bad! birdie 🦉 #251: 🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥 https://birdiegame.net/
    2 points
  39. 2 points
  40. A pretty below average day at this location. https://ebird.org/checklist/S126981019
    2 points
  41. Pine Warbler. Took me long enough to get a good picture of one. Ratings appreciated https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/528413431
    2 points
  42. I chased these Lesser Nighthawks yesterday and missed them. From other birder's intel who did spot them, I moved my observation point today and was EXACTLY where I needed to be. The only reason for the lack of good photos is that the birds showed up sixteen minutes after sundown, and my camera is not too good in low-light conditions. My checklist also made one of the county Rare Bird Alerts from the observation: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/528208521
    2 points
  43. 2 points
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