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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/27/2023 in all areas

  1. Wilson's. Common is an Eurasian species and would be extremely rare anywhere in North America away from parts of Alaska. If one was to show up in the lower 48, it would be in the winter
    6 points
  2. An amazing bird...The American Avocet just enjoying the day.
    6 points
  3. It's hard to not like Thick-billed Longspurs https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/588831281
    5 points
  4. Ovenbird! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/588827871
    4 points
  5. Least Flycatchers have always avoided me for some reason. I've heard so many of them, and only got brief views and never pics before. The ones I found today were being just as annoying, but at least they popped out in the open (albeit in bad lighting) for a few seconds after chasing them around for almost half an hour. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/588636981 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/588636991
    4 points
  6. 3 points
  7. Caution is definitely warranted here, and as the OP said, voice recordings would help, but I’m leaning Brown-crested. There is lots of gray in the face, rufous is limited to the primaries (not necessarily diagnostic), and the bill seems within range of BCFL and too large for Nutting’s. That being said, I have never seen NUFL.
    3 points
  8. near the milk river in northern Montana June 22
    3 points
  9. I don't think it is. GISS feels like WEKI, but everything else fits CAKI just right.
    3 points
  10. Another good feature to look for is the contrasting paler feather edges on the upper wing coverts. The contrast is much weaker in adult Westerns. When using this feature extra care is required with juveniles, but details of head, breast, and chin/throat plumage should help. Tail pattern is great, but note that when worn, the white tail tip of Cassin’s can be less noticeable, and also that the can show slight white outer sides to the outer tail feathers, but it is much less contrasting and obvious; also the middle of the tail is blacked on Westerns.
    3 points
  11. Lazuli Bunting https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/588556761
    3 points
  12. Probably not my "best" of the day but it's hard to turn down posting a male tanager! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/588403051
    3 points
  13. Back from Hawaii only actually went 'birding' a couple of times for short amounts of time but kept my eyes open any time we were out for a walk and my wife even tolerated a couple of screeching halts and u-turns when I passed something I knew was new along the road. Visited both the big island and Maui and pretty well drove the complete perimeter of both. If I counted correctly I saw 27 sp plus at least one more unique one that I couldn't narrow down but would have been a lifer either way - 21 of those were lifers. Not bad for a non-birding trip.
    3 points
  14. https://ebird.org/checklist/S142875846
    2 points
  15. Ratings Appreciated: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/588804041
    2 points
  16. There are lots and lots of possibilities, but it really depends on what you want to see, and perhaps what you didn’t already pick up at Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR. I was going to suggest Barr Lake as well, as well. It’s a very well known birding spot (they run a long-standing banding operation there in the fall), but I’m not sure exactly what you could still pick up there at the tail end of your CO travels that you don’t already have. If you have the gumption, Pawnee National Grassland is a good place to pick up grassland specialists such as Thick-billed and Chestnut-collared Longspurs and Cassin’s Sparrow. The Crow Valley Campground out there is reliable for Brown Thrasher. If you do go, bring lots of water and sunscreen, it’s pretty desolate out there. DM me for more info if you want it.
    2 points
  17. I knew this photo by the contributors name birdie 🦅 #403: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    2 points
  18. 2 points
  19. Greater Pewee... I was birding some high mountains in the far south of Arizona years ago. All was very quiet except for the warm wind in the tops of the trees making them sound as if they were a slow flowing river. Looking down on the trail I walked I could see bare footprints of immigrants working their way from the south to some place they were dreaming about. I began thinking about Cochise and the last bit of land he occupied when, for the first time in my life I heard the haunting song of the Greater Pewee. https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/greater-pewee listen to their dawn call. This was a life experience I'll never forget.
    2 points
  20. James is his birth/legal name and Jim is what he normally goes by
    2 points
  21. Your photos almost look black and white, and so look arty. I love them!!
    2 points
  22. Yes, Tree Swallows.
    2 points
  23. Yellow Garden Spider- not sure what to make of the spider above the main one. Do spiders shed? Is it the male?
    2 points
  24. So many good photos of Boat-tailed Grackles. Super common here in Florida. I chose this photo not because it is my best but because it is a favorite. Note the white eyes on this Atlantic Boat-tailed Grackle a subspecies of the Boat-tailed Grackle that has brown eyes. Both are common in Florida. This white eyed version is probably why I see unconfirmed Great-tailed Grackle rare bird alerts here sometimes. This is also a favorite as the birds seemed to be performing a mating ritual. Would love to post a photo of the brown eyed version too but I'd probably get in trouble.
    2 points
  25. Great-tailed Grackle-saw this species in Colorado mostly in the spring like this one who was singing his lungs out. A common bird in Colorado but not nearly as common as the Common Grackle there. I see rare bird alerts for these in Florida once in awhile but only one was confirmed that I know of but was hours away from where I live.
    2 points
  26. Common Grackle-I bird I see frequently but photograph rarely. This one is from Colorado but I see them often in Florida too.
    2 points
  27. Probably one of my favorite shots from my Henslow's Sparrow encounter a few weeks ago; finally getting this in before a big thunder storm coming through knocks out our power or something. ML588194071 Henslow's Sparrow Macaulay Library
    2 points
  28. All those birds are Westerns. This is one of those where it's a learned feel which you get better at with more experience. One other good field mark to look at if you can't see the tail is wing color. Typically it looks like Western's upper wings are significantly darker than the back (visible in most that you linked). That contrast isn't typically as noticeable in Cassin's (or the wings can actually look paler sometimes).
    2 points
  29. It's a Cassin's, Western never has that strong of a contrast between the head and the throat.
    2 points
  30. from Thursday at Green Cay in Boynton Beach FL.
    2 points
  31. birdie 🐦 #403: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    1 point
  32. Barr Lake State Park comes to mind as very close to DIA. There are areas round DIA/Barr Lake that aren't a park or reserve but are rural and can have some good birds. Lower Latham Reservoir is another area you might consider. But keep in mind you aren't trying to bird the actual reservoir but the drainage area. The Res is on private property. But, it would be easier to make suggestions if I knew what you hope to see.
    1 point
  33. birdie 🦆 #402: 🟨🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    1 point
  34. Thanks, it broke for me too. 🤷🏻‍♂️ And I haven’t been able to find it.
    1 point
  35. Thanks! This wasn’t at Irvine park-was in Mike square regional park. Hybrids can occur anywhere tho
    1 point
  36. It looks like it or another Abdim's Stork is still at Lincoln Park Zoo https://www.lpzoo.org/exhibits/mccormick-bird-house/ eta: A link to Lincoln Park Zoo for this species came up when I searched Abdim's Stork on startpage.com this morning, and I didn't click it until now; I then clicked through to the bird house page linked above
    1 point
  37. For some reason my photo didn't post properly so I'll try it again. Thanks! Common Grackle
    1 point
  38. Southern Ontario this morning two Herring Gulls gathering up leafy material. I thought the nesting period was usually finished by mid-June. They started off modestly but became more ambitious. I like to add tags to my photos so "nest building" or is this a food search?
    1 point
  39. Great-tailed Boat-tailed. I have three really good ones of this species, but I’ll post the female here. Common
    1 point
  40. Good morning, Whatbirders! Welcome to the last week of June, the first full week of astronomical summer. We'll celebrate with Grackles! Common, Boat-tailed, and / or Great-tailed. Photo, audio, or video.
    1 point
  41. Just imagine the reaction if the bird was named after the behavior @Kevin described. An Ivory-billed Woodpeeker would confuse even more people.
    1 point
  42. You had me there for a second! 😂😂
    1 point
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