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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/01/2023 in all areas

  1. Siskin (L), House Finch (R) siskin Vesper
    9 points
  2. Looks good for Bank Swallow.
    7 points
  3. 6 points
  4. My head says coopers but I would like to get opinions on it, It looks like a slight eyebrow on it,but I have seen many coops that look like this...
    5 points
  5. Since nobody else has replied yet, I'll start this off: I don't think any of these are Song Sparrows, sorry! All Song Sparrows (as far as I know) have a distinctive brown streaking pattern on their face: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/sonspa I am not familiar with all of the species pictured yet (I am new to birding myself). Possibly one or two of these is a House Finch (female/immature), but I can't say with any degree of certainty without doing more research as there are other similar looking birds. In your last photo, in particular, note the very well-defined white eyering. This might be a Vesper Sparrow, but I've never seen one and can't say for sure. The topmost bird might be a Pine Siskin - note the narrower bill. In summary, my *guesses* are (from top to bottom): Pine Siskin, House Finch, House Finch, Vesper Sparrow I'm sure by tomorrow morning you'll have more definitive answers from other good folks here!
    5 points
  6. Same bird as Derek, this was a bird I was never expecting to actually get a good look at in California
    5 points
  7. Yellow-crowned Night-Heron.
    5 points
  8. I think the second photo is another Pine Siskin, the bill looks too slender for a finch.
    4 points
  9. Yes. Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
    4 points
  10. Cape May. Note the short, almost spotty streaked on the breast and sides, the streaked crown, and facial pattern.
    4 points
  11. Golden-winged Warbler: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609429425
    4 points
  12. Red-bellied Woodpecker: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609431036
    4 points
  13. 4 points
  14. Seen in May 2020 in western Iowa. There were Barn, Cliff, and Tree swallows all flying in the area at the time.
    3 points
  15. 1-3.Horned Lark 4-5.Savannah Sparrow 6-7.Eastern Phoebe
    3 points
  16. 3 points
  17. 3 points
  18. I always thought of myself as being in a class of my own.
    3 points
  19. Good morning, Whatbirders, and welcome to October!!! I'm at the Carolina Bird Club's fall meeting in coastal SC. I decided last week that the first bird I saw at the event would be this week's bird. Ladies, gentlemen, and @lonestranger, Caspian Tern
    3 points
  20. In addition to the belly-band, an adult Red-shouldered would have very contrasting markings on the wings and tail in this view, I believe.
    3 points
  21. Golden-winged Warbler: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609429662
    3 points
  22. Not the best picture, but this is the first chaseable Dickcissel in my county in a dozen years. Prior to this bird, there were exactly two photos of this species in the entire county. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609408234
    3 points
  23. Looks good for Sharpie, pretty bug-eyed
    2 points
  24. I don’t think we can trust that, given the bill is a similar color. My gut instinct was Sanderling due to the underlying pattern that is visible, but I can’t decide whether that third pic shows a hind toe or not.
    2 points
  25. First birds are Horned Larks, last Eastern Phoebe. Leaning toward Savannah for the sparrow
    2 points
  26. Weird bird but it’s an Anna’s. Not sure about the bill.
    2 points
  27. Thanks, just did a deep dive on western red tails and man you guys got all kinds out there,LOL, If I saw this bird here in jersey I would have thought red shouldered all day, thanks for taking the time to explain it...
    2 points
  28. Two shots from this morning at my local spot. The sunflowers were mostly done, but the lighting was pretty nice. Some Western Bluebirds: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609443605 A Northern Flicker: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609443564
    2 points
  29. Why isn’t this a red shouldered?… taking in the fact I am on the east coast
    2 points
  30. Jealous! That's one I've always wanted to see.
    2 points
  31. 2 points
  32. Editing your audio is great, but just like editing photos, it should be done as minimally as possible and in such a way to make the media more similar to the experience you had in the field. The risk with editing audio - or photos - is that you can distort the media such that it is not representative of what actually occurred in the field. For example, by boosting contrast and saturation and adjusting colors in a photo, you could make a Cassin’s Vireo look more like a Blue-headed Vireo. This is part of why eBird recommendations suggest only trimming and amplifying audio. That way no information is being lost, or added. More important than editing audio, is obtaining decent quality audio in the first place. What this means is reducing background noise as much as possible - don’t have people talking in the background for example, or wait until there is a lull in other bird noises to obtain audio of your target. Basically your results will be better if you try to do more quality control on the front end, rather than the back end.
    2 points
  33. I got several decent Lincoln's Sparrow shots last night! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609378396
    2 points
  34. Doesn't this bird have a dark nape? That'd would mean it would be a sharpie right?
    1 point
  35. Hi folks. I saw some little brown birds this morning (9/30) in northern Arizona. The location has some little ponds and plants. Here are some photos of different birds. Are these Song Sparrows? What should I be looking for to ID birds like these? The stripy fronts? Also, in the first photo, is it probably a female (upper) and male (lower), due to the size difference? https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609443642 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609443644 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/609443643
    1 point
  36. Yellow legs makes me say least sandpiper.
    1 point
  37. Yep, looking with fresh eyes today, the second photo is definitely a Pine Siskin. The bill is somewhat open, giving the initial impression that it's more finch-like than it is. The yellow on the wing, which I couldn't discern in Night Mode yesterday, is not something a House Finch would ever have.
    1 point
  38. I agree with the first three and pass on the last.
    1 point
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