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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/24/2023 in all areas

  1. 8 points
  2. That second one looks right to me, with the brown flanks, blurry streaks underneath, and mostly rufous wings.
    7 points
  3. Song Sparrow. A swamp won’t ever be that streaky outside of juvenile plumage-which this is way too late for and that would look different as well.
    5 points
  4. Added 4 birds to my year list these past few days, including 2 state birds! The annual Nelson’s and LeConte’s Sparrows, and vagrant Surf Scoter and today’s Red Phalarope bring me up to 272/297 for the year! (TN/World). I am now ahead of last years world list pace by 2 species.
    5 points
  5. 5 points
  6. Not that familiar with YCNH (being from upstate NY) but am getting a Yellow-crowned impression on all 3 pics.
    4 points
  7. I'll try one more time... I suspected from in the first shot that this was a <warbler> species. I made a semi-educated guess in that family and missed, but had the family confirmed. For the second shot, I tried another species I thought was a good fit. It wasn't For the remaining images, I saw nothing that gave me personally any additional information I was familiar with. As I saw each image and gained nothing from it, I clicked 'Guess' for the remaining shots without choosing a species. Had I seen something I recognized, I might have ventured another guess. Eventually I reached the end and saw what the bird was. I saw it was another bird that I had only name recognition with, not visually, and that I wouldn't have gotten it if the full photo had been the first image. As I've said repeatedly, I don't care what my score is. It's not whether I win or lose, it's whether I learn anything by playing the game. I may make random guesses if I can narrow it down to a few birds, but that's not my habit. If I'm reduced to just guessing, it's easier to just click 'Guess'.
    4 points
  8. Sadly, the latter. Typical adult northern mockingbird.
    4 points
  9. All three of them are Yellow-crowned Night-Herons.
    3 points
  10. Okay, take it the other way around. I could guess bitterns, be in the right family, and not be getting any closer to 'Heron'. Either way, I don't take this at all seriously. I often can't remember at lunch time what species I saw this morning.
    3 points
  11. Hey, @Jagularr, FYI, at the recent meeting of the Carolina Bird Club, 'Birdie' was mentioned frequently and favorably. Several regional reviewers said they played daily.
    3 points
  12. @Jagularr has been notified by private message that Birdie isnt loading it's photo this morning.
    3 points
  13. 3 points
  14. Chased a "Queen Eider" today and got a couple bonus lifers too #387 King Eider #388 Short-billed Dowitcher #389 Long-tailed Duck
    3 points
  15. Immature White Ibis, based on the white belly. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/White_Ibis/overview
    2 points
  16. Yes it happens every year at Cape May. They all group together before crossing the bay on their way south. Always pretty cool to see. As others have said also it's worth checking for other species mixed in. A couple years ago there was a Zone-tailed Hawk mixed in & it seems like almost every year Swainson's show up too.
    2 points
  17. I don't understand your math, but I suspect that @Charlie Spencer stopped guessing, possibly simply because he wasn't in a guessing mood.
    2 points
  18. birdie 🦢 #522: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    2 points
  19. Size can be difficult to judge but North American warblers are half the size of this mockingbird.
    2 points
  20. Batesburg-Leesville Industrial Park, Lexington County, central SC. November 2019 Photo lifer. My lifer was the day before in the same patch. I have closer photos but I like the autumn setting.
    2 points
  21. Vultures do migrate and now is the time for many areas of the country but you didn't tell us where this was. More than likely they are all gathered together like that because of a favorable updraft or thermal, likely either caused by an offshore wind hitting the cliffs or simply the air over the sand warming as the day gets hotter.
    2 points
  22. Deja vu? I guess @TN/QCmust be @jim bird's friend.
    2 points
  23. Forster’s Tern. The black eye patch is somewhat distinctive for them. Look at their nonbreeding plumage.
    2 points
  24. I think the rounded tail you're seeing in the first image is actually equal length tail feathers, just fanned out. If the outer tail feathers were shorter, like on a Cooper's Hawk, the rounded tail would look even more rounded. The next two shots show the equal length tail feathers which points me towards Sharp-shinned Hawk. Wait for opinions from those that actually know what they're talking about.
    1 point
  25. Seconded. Juvy White Ibis.
    1 point
  26. Flock wouldn't be incorrect. Kettle is used when a flock (not necessarily just vultures) is riding thermals or 'kettling' (not just standing around or flying from one spot to another). Don't ask me why; maybe because the birds rise like the bubbling contents of a hot pot?
    1 point
  27. There's a cell phone tower here in central Lexington with water tower less than a quarter-mile away. In the winter when the migrants are here, they'll have several hundred vultures perching overnight. No exaggeration; I've counted them early before they start to launch. There's something in the area that generates active thermals when the sun starts warming things up. They'll orbit in large kettles at all hours of the day.
    1 point
  28. Oh yeah, I just noticed a Bald Eagle to the right but other than that they seem to all be vultures.
    1 point
  29. If you did start with green heron and you got a yellow tile for heron, why would you ever guess a bittern? It’s obvious that won’t be correct, if heron was correct.
    1 point
  30. Time permitting, it's often worth looking closely at the birds in these 'kettles'. Sometimes there are species in there other than vultures.
    1 point
  31. I may be wrong but kinda smells like an advertising troll account?
    1 point
  32. Doooh! I was thrown by its shape, it looked more warbler-like. Never rule out the obvious, I guess... Is it an immature one, or am I making it more complicated than it needs to be?
    1 point
  33. I really like these little bearded readlings! I still do not have the “perfect” photo that I really want from this species, but I’ll get it eventually! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610294356
    1 point
  34. Here's my only and best encounter with a Henslow's Sparrow. I would like to change the bird's name to royal pain in the butt sparrow. It took me way too long to get these shots, and there's still plenty of crud in the way, lol. https://ebird.org/checklist/S102602250
    1 point
  35. Yep. Female Brewer's Blackbird.
    1 point
  36. 1. Western 2. California 3. Western
    1 point
  37. 1 point
  38. the reason there were no shore birds...
    1 point
  39. Got a flock of lifer Red Crossbills come through camp, fall colors were fabulous, weather couldn't be improved unless you count the wind, and my 3 year old walked 7 miles in one afternoon. Not bad for a quick overnight backpack trip in October.
    1 point
  40. Today while photographing this rarity: Incidentally photographed these migrants that were also in town this week: The local wildlife didn't seem impressed with either: The Redstart photo is actually from the previous day (different bird and location). The photos I got today weren't as good.
    1 point
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