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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/25/2023 in all areas

  1. 1. Double-crested Cormorant 2. Double-crested Cormorant 3. Snowy Egret 4. Royal Tern 5. Cattle Egret 6. White Ibis (left), Glossy Ibis(right)
    7 points
  2. birdie 🦢 #523: 🟨🟥🟨🟥🟥🟥 https://birdiegame.net/ Those colors should push @IKLland right over the edge
    6 points
  3. It is a coot, though I agree it looks a little funky. It may be in a late stage if molt, either from immature to adult or just replacing feathers.
    5 points
  4. 5. would be Western Cattle Egret with the new taxonomy update
    5 points
  5. Northern Jacana in Arizona
    5 points
  6. I feel like it could be a Canada with a pigment issue. Not sure though.
    5 points
  7. I agree with Sharpie here. Coarse streaking, large eyes, tail feathers all same length, shorter tail, steep forehead.
    5 points
  8. Is this just a name change or did they split species? Where can I find more info on this? edit: found my answers here: https://ebird.org/news/2023-taxonomy-update
    4 points
  9. 4 points
  10. Prothonotary Warbler from a few weeks ago ML610343401 - Prothonotary Warbler - Macaulay Library ML610343418 - Prothonotary Warbler - Macaulay Library
    4 points
  11. I think the rounded tail you're seeing in the first image is actually equal length tail feathers, just fanned out. If the outer tail feathers were shorter, like on a Cooper's Hawk, the rounded tail would look even more rounded. The next two shots show the equal length tail feathers which points me towards Sharp-shinned Hawk. Wait for opinions from those that actually know what they're talking about.
    4 points
  12. All three of them are Yellow-crowned Night-Herons.
    4 points
  13. Not that familiar with YCNH (being from upstate NY) but am getting a Yellow-crowned impression on all 3 pics.
    4 points
  14. Batesburg-Leesville Industrial Park, Lexington County, central SC. November 2019 Photo lifer. My lifer was the day before in the same patch. I have closer photos but I like the autumn setting.
    4 points
  15. birdie 🦉 #523: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    3 points
  16. birdie 🦆 #523: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    3 points
  17. With three wrong guesses again, too.
    3 points
  18. I'm not an expert, but aside from what was already said, the other reasons I immediately thought YCNH: 1. The sad looking upper eyelid (particularly on the first one) 2. The thin white lines on the wings
    3 points
  19. Agreed, that was my gut instinct. I’m not seeing any of the marks of a Snow/Ross’s (other than the white). The bill looks fine for a CANG. The only thing that feels weird to me is how low it’s sitting in the water.
    3 points
  20. And bill color (black crowned won’t ever be that dark at this age(or any age?)
    3 points
  21. Yeah, looks like it could be a hybrid (certainly not a pure snow, look at the white primaries), but I don't know how to eliminate just a weird color abnormality.
    3 points
  22. Immature White Ibis, based on the white belly. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/White_Ibis/overview
    3 points
  23. Sounds like this would be an awesome birding lens!! https://www.canonrumors.com/canon-rf-200-800mm-f-6-3-9-is-coming-on-november-2-2023/?fbclid=IwAR24t3kwv7ra3JLnehKdHbWG8koGEZf-WOIvX88pIWpU1LbVTi7l1aQ-a38_aem_AQgQNAAWxtZYzD3X_0uBtWIOgw0EwzvDC9QVJjLYgs82QE0RJphjFdOJ-QYxjCx85Xg&amp
    2 points
  24. I agree, the other two birds are (Western) Cattle Egrets.
    2 points
  25. I was in you boat too, until one showed up roughly an hour from home a couple of years ago. And, I looked at the photo, did not look at a field guide, thought of the answer then thought "why not?", typed in the answer, held my breath, and then fainted. Ok, the last part isn't true. I was happily astonished though! birdie 🦢 #523: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    2 points
  26. ......and the adjacent small white triangles on the tips of the secondaries (versus the much larger ones on a BCNH) - I thought this used to be the most common identifier mentioned on these threads. We had a juvenile show up a few weeks ago on Lake Huron (two plus hours north of Toronto), first for county.
    2 points
  27. Hmm. I’ve hesitated getting the 800mm f/11 as I just don’t think Michigan weather is very accommodating to shoot at f/11. Not sure if f/9 is enough light to pull the trigger, especially at $2K. Definitely dig their approach though with the more consumer friendly lenses.
    2 points
  28. Such a cool bird birdie 🦅 #523: 🟨🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    2 points
  29. I think you already saw this photo, but it is still my best for the field sparrow
    2 points
  30. It's up and running now. Thanks again, @Jagularr 👍
    2 points
  31. @Jagularr has been notified that Birdie isn't loading again this morning.
    2 points
  32. They are super closely related! They even sound identical!
    2 points
  33. Yep, Yellow-crowned by shape.
    2 points
  34. Okay, take it the other way around. I could guess bitterns, be in the right family, and not be getting any closer to 'Heron'. Either way, I don't take this at all seriously. I often can't remember at lunch time what species I saw this morning.
    2 points
  35. 2 points
  36. I really like these little bearded readlings! I still do not have the “perfect” photo that I really want from this species, but I’ll get it eventually! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610294356
    2 points
  37. My hard work is paying off! After birding this field 2-3 times a week for all of October, I have found some great birds! The first was a county 1st Yellow Rail on October 4th. Then, the Sedge (only 4 or so previous records in the county) and Marsh Wrens invaded, and I got county high counts for both in the following weeks. Today, I found a 1st county record LeConte's Sparrow, and 2nd county record Nelson's Sparrows! https://ebird.org/checklist/S153033679
    1 point
  38. Young Little Blue Herons would have light-to-dark blue bills and no trace of orange.
    1 point
  39. looking like Cattle Egrets to me (last two photos), forgive me for not knowing the "new-new" name for this location just yet.
    1 point
  40. Bringing this back...again. This is a range restricted bird that was formerly one larger species. No back to back guesses please! See page 1 for general rules.
    1 point
  41. Great. I'm somewhat busy coming up, but if you saw my message over discord im sure I can help you as well as Connor, I know he's even busier.
    1 point
  42. Welcome to Whatbird, @Avalonityy! You can hear recordings of those birds at https://www.macaulaylibrary.org/ and https://xeno-canto.org/ among other places. Of course if you do get a recording, that will help a lot.
    1 point
  43. Canada Goose butt right of center at the water's edge. Beyond that, you're on your own.
    1 point
  44. birdie 🦢 #523: 🟨🟨🟨🟨🟨🟩 I have not seen this bird. I hope to change that, though.
    1 point
  45. Two options could be Northern Potoo or Jamaican Owl. I think the potoo sounds more like laughter, but it's probably worth listening to both to compare. Other nocturnal birds are less common and don't really have a laughter-like quality to their calls.
    1 point
  46. If you did start with green heron and you got a yellow tile for heron, why would you ever guess a bittern? It’s obvious that won’t be correct, if heron was correct.
    1 point
  47. I'll try one more time... I suspected from in the first shot that this was a <warbler> species. I made a semi-educated guess in that family and missed, but had the family confirmed. For the second shot, I tried another species I thought was a good fit. It wasn't For the remaining images, I saw nothing that gave me personally any additional information I was familiar with. As I saw each image and gained nothing from it, I clicked 'Guess' for the remaining shots without choosing a species. Had I seen something I recognized, I might have ventured another guess. Eventually I reached the end and saw what the bird was. I saw it was another bird that I had only name recognition with, not visually, and that I wouldn't have gotten it if the full photo had been the first image. As I've said repeatedly, I don't care what my score is. It's not whether I win or lose, it's whether I learn anything by playing the game. I may make random guesses if I can narrow it down to a few birds, but that's not my habit. If I'm reduced to just guessing, it's easier to just click 'Guess'.
    1 point
  48. Fieldcraft! (The names in parentheses are the members who offered the idea!) ? Please read the American Birding Association’s Code of Birding Ethics (https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/). (Aaron) Don’t crowd a bird for a better look/photo. (Kevin) ? Be patient. Learning to sit and watch a bird for a while until you see what you need to make an ID is very useful. By the time you’re satisfied with the bird you’re watching, a new one is likely to appear! (Aveschapines) Don't rush from one bird to the next just to get a higher volume of birds on your list. Enjoy the quality of birding as much as the quantity of birds. Take your time while birding so that you can enjoy the other wildlife around you, too. Nature is a wonderful thing and its beauty goes way beyond the birds we watch. (lonestranger) ? My number one piece of advice would be to spend time looking at and noticing birds, preferably in the field. Feeder studies are great and serve a purpose, but being out in the field looking at birds, noticing behavior, plumage characteristics, vocalizations, and what impression a bird gives you will help you identify and understand birds. (DLecy) ? Bring lots of water. There have been times where I didn't, and it's no fun. (Aiden B) If you are planning on birding early in the morning, remember to eat something, especially if you’re planning on doing some recording. When I bird, I like to leave before sunrise and I just wake up and go. As a result, I have had many recordings ruined because my stomach wanted to join in the action. High pass filters don’t always help! (Aaron) ? One thing you need to get started birding is a pair of quality binoculars. (IKLland) You can get good entry-level pair of 8x42 binos for less than $150 on sale or used. This is an ideal magnification and objective size for a first pair. Look for a manufacturer that has a lifetime, no questions asked warranty - Nikon, Zeiss, Vortex, Bushnell, among others. B&H, Adorama, and other online retailers offer excellent reconditioned optic and cameras at bargain prices. (Charlie Spencer) ? Wear clothing that matches the habitat you are in, I can get a lot closer to birds when I am wearing black or brown instead of white or yellow. (Aiden B) Have sunscreen and insect repellent in the car; you never know when you’ll need them. Hats with soft cloth brims flex out of the way when you push your binos or camera up under them; hats with hard, cardboard-reinforced brims may not allow you to position those tools comfortably. (Charlie Spencer) ? Make notes! Our memories are very faulty and it's very easy to convince yourself that bird's legs were really red when it makes it match an exciting species. (Aveschapines) ? Don't forget to look behind you. We tend to focus on what is in front of us, but it's worth stopping and turning to look behind yourself now and then. (lonestranger) And look up at he sky above you, above mountain ridges, etc to see what’s flying over. I think some people get caught up in looking for the little birds in the bushes and trees. (The Bird Nuts) And also look down for those infernal sparrows & wrens. (floraphile) Sit and wait in one spot, you never know what might come to you. (Michael Long) ? Keep in mind where the sun is, and where it will be. If possible, plan your route so the sun is behind you rather than in front. You want to see the bird, not the silhouette. This is especially important if trying to take pictures. (Paul K) Keeping track of where the sun is while watching birds overhead is vitally important if you don’t want to blind yourself. (Avery) If you see a shadow, the bird is between its shadow on the ground and the sun in the sky. If the shadow is very close to you, the bird is on line between you and the sun, so don't bother looking for it in the glare. Track the shadow for a couple of seconds until the bird is off line, then look for it. (Charlie Spencer) ? Cameras can be important to capture images for later study. (Roadguy205) Don't feel any sense of shame for taking photos of a common bird to get an ID. (chipperatl) If you use a camera, get comfortable with taking crappy photos for ID purposes rather than aiming for perfection. I'm still more likely to grab my camera if I really don't know what something is, as it can operate as a form of long-term binoculars that I can use to sit down with resources later to get a good ID. (Paul K) However, don't sacrifice field observation for a photo. Try to watch the bird as much as possible and make getting photos a secondary goal. Write down or record a description as well; not all photos provide all of the information needed for an ID. Sometimes distortions can occur that make field marks look different in photos. (Aveschapines) ? If a 2-year-old is included in your birding party, you will have low numbers. (floraphile) Ditto terriers. (Charlie Spencer)
    1 point
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