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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/03/2023 in all areas

  1. 10 points
  2. had some road rage happen right in front of me today...
    7 points
  3. It was hard to get good photos today with all of the wind. I'll go with this Ring-billed Gull: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610678279
    6 points
  4. House Finch (female) (edit: or maybe juvenile?)
    5 points
  5. This morning, the winter's first American Coot tied me with last year. This afternoon, a Blue-headed Vireo put me ahead.
    4 points
  6. Trail's Flycatcher maybe?
    4 points
  7. In the middle of nowhere, they have been there for two weeks. The expressions on their faces are changing with age.
    4 points
  8. Seems to be looking right at me. Easily my favorite Woodpecker. From yesterday in Clay County, FL
    4 points
  9. You're on it! Sorry about the breeding-male bias, but let me begin my campaign for "Black-and-Burning Warbler".
    3 points
  10. Pic was taken in Spring in central California. I assume it was a wren. I only got two pics, and this is by far the better one. I'm in Nebraska, so I'm not familiar with those western birds.
    3 points
  11. 3 points
  12. Saw this cool paper that came out recently, apparently the several white-breasted nuthatch forms in North America are quite distinct and have limited hybridization rates. Maybe we'll finally see a three way nuthatch split soon! I haven't read everything yet, but it looks very interesting. Molecular Ecology | Molecular Genetics Journal | Wiley Online Library And a pdf if the access to the link doesn't work. Molecular Ecology - 2023 - Askelson - Genomic divergence and introgression between cryptic species of a widespread North.pdf
    2 points
  13. Thanks for the ID guys. That makes one female House Finch and one male House Finch (easily identified by color) for this morning. Two Golden-fronted Woodpeckers on the same tree. They like to slurp the nectar from the hummingbird feeder and dine on the mix of seed, nuts, and dried fruit sold as "wild bird trail mix". I have plenty of Black-crested Titmice, Carolina Chickadees, Lesser Goldfinches, Carolina Wrens, and one Ruby-throated Hummingbird who appears daily at the feeder when it is not monopolized by the woodpeckers. Today through the following week the daily highs expected range from mid 70's to mid 80''s. This is in contrast to the blustery and rainy weather of Monday through Wednesday when overnight lows were in the high 30's.
    2 points
  14. Pretty sure this is a lifer Linden Looper Moth. 21st species I've ever had in November.
    2 points
  15. I had to look up auriculars. 🙂 I found a photo using a White Throated Sparrow with all parts of the head ID'd (even the eye, LOL!) Very useful ID point, thanks again.
    2 points
  16. I wrote on Facebook, "Another one from Whatbird, taken 10/31/23 near Boynton Beach, Florida, by dragon49. Used by permission. The photographer has put it on eBird as falcon sp, but I'm wondering whether it can be identified as a Merlin or an American Kestrel. I thought the length of the tail and the "string of pearls" on the trailing edge of the wings suggested Kestrel, but since others thought it looked a bit better for a Merlin, I hope you'll explain why I'm wrong." Brian Rusnica wrote, "I comp'd together a couple of somewhat similar Merlin/Kestrel "from behind" frames from my library with your bird, which I do think is an American Kestrel, mostly due to the wing shape which to me appears longer, thinner and less angular than a Merlin."
    2 points
  17. The photo I got of the Mountain Bluebird that showed up in Florida in January 2020 isn't the greatest for sure but it is a very unique bird to find in Florida, so kind of a favorite. So it is pictured below since I can't post it the best or favorite topic.My husband and I were actually chasing a Ruff (also pictured below) in Hernando County, FL. That found we spoke with a another birder who told us about the Mountain Bluebird in neighboring Pasco County and of course we decided to chase that too. I'm also sharing a picture of a Savannah Sparrow seen in the same rural area where the Mountain Bluebird was found that came out pretty good.
    2 points
  18. I'm hopeful there will be room for public influence during the process. A lot of these birds have potential for some super cool names, which we may as well go for if we're removing honorifics. Don't know how well 70+ more names like Thick-billed Longspur, or Short-billed Gull would go over with the birding community as a whole.
    2 points
  19. Lesser Black-backed Gull: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610611574
    2 points
  20. You west coasters will all agree with me here
    1 point
  21. Meep Meep! My best ever pic of a roadrunner.
    1 point
  22. As long as we get Yarmulked Warbler, I'm fine with it.
    1 point
  23. Thanks! I bet you're right, although with the grainy quality of my photo, I'm sure we won't be able to tell if it was Willow or Alder.
    1 point
  24. One of our county's top birders suggested this spot for rarities today due to the weather conditions, so I gave it a shot. I couldn't risk breaking another camera, so I didn't go too far out on the jetty and risk water damage. I did the best I could with my limited view and ended up with a good number of species for this hotspot, including a FOY Common Tern. See the checklist notes for more details. https://ebird.org/checklist/S153615959
    1 point
  25. https://earthsky.org/earth/bird-names-2023-american-ornithological-society/ The responses were enough to remind me what a great forum Whatbird is. Members here are able to disagree without feeling it necessary to insult people. I doubt I'll be going back.
    1 point
  26. I had endeavored to start a lengthy response against changing the names, but as I didn't get it finished last night and the topic has so changed from the discussion at that time, I see no point in bringing it back up. I'm probably not going to change anyone's mind, nor they mine. I dislike descriptive names, as a new birder they were terribly confusing. The easiest bird I learned was the Osprey. Simple, short and easy to remember, things like Yellow-crowned Night-Heron was a nightmare. Also some of the descriptive names are so m/f or age/molt dependent that as a new birder you just expect that feature to be there and dismiss species based solely off that. Also as to changing the names, it will cause havoc among the new/only partly interested birders. Of course that will be gone within a few years. When I started birding scrub-jays had just been split, my guides and most resources on line were out of date or had absolutely no explanation of what had happened, it was at least three years into birding before I understood. Of course that is short lived. If they are going to be renamed they should be named with short names, no dashes, no complicated capitalization, and no more than two words.
    1 point
  27. I think this is a really god point, and a fascinating idea. I like it. Why not draw attention to the subtle beauty of female birds? It would be helpful for birders too, from an ID perspective.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. Muscovy Duck: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610641829
    1 point
  30. I'm making postcards! They're on thick, uncoated paper, so people can color them and send them to friends and family. They also have bird facts and colors on the back. Here's a prototype. I'll probably make packs of 20, with 5 different designs in each pack. Any suggestions for revisions?
    1 point
  31. Just noticed that 4 days ago I hit 1,300 days of checklist streak! Creeping up on 2,000 complete checklists too
    1 point
  32. 400 days of checklist streak!
    1 point
  33. Killdeer: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610537508
    1 point
  34. Irruption year for these! Man are they everywhere! Been trying to get good photos while I can-if it’s not an irruption year they’re very uncommon here. These may be my best ones yet! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610515454 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610515455
    1 point
  35. Eastern Phoebe. Saluda Shoals Park, Lexington County, central SC. 28 Oct 23. A cooperative bird that hung out for the 'Last Saturday of the Month' bird walk. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610476154
    1 point
  36. Close up of some of the huge flock of Green-winged Teals and Northern Pintails that flushed all at once in a marsh near the western shore of Chesapeake Bay. I was lucky enough to be in an observation tower when it happened.
    1 point
  37. It's shockingly hard to get good photos of this species. I'm quite pleased with how this one turned out! ML610491691 - Nuttall's Woodpecker - Macaulay Library
    1 point
  38. Forked-tailed Flycatcher: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/610481705
    1 point
  39. people have checklist backlog????? terrifying...
    1 point
  40. So, I had a bunch of backlogged checklists and in an attempt to submit all of my checklists before Oct. 23rd, and I unknowingly, but clearly, passed 2,000 days checklists streak.
    1 point
  41. 400 species with photos!!
    1 point
  42. I've now birded in every single county in California! It's a big state so it's hard to do that without extensive traveling!
    1 point
  43. 6000 photos on eBird!!!
    1 point
  44. 600 complete checklists!! 65 species with audio 100 day checklist streak!!!
    1 point
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