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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/24/2023 in all areas

  1. 5 points
  2. Moving in with Mom in coastal NC. Mom is 88 and has done her best since Dad died a couple of years ago, but she really needs full-time company. She's hasn't been good with directions or navigation for a few decades, and she's tired of going to just the three places she can remember (convenience store, grocery, Subway). She has 1600 sq ft with just her and the dog. Houses and cars are all paid for, hers and ours. We'll sort stuff into piles for Move, Store, or Dispose, and put the house on the market in Jan or Feb. We're too laid back to hit the ground running; too much like work! We're already familiar with the area. Kayaking will wait until the water warms back up. Pickleball may be on the agenda. My primary birding concentration will be improving my shorebird skills.
    4 points
  3. There's currently a Purple Gallinule in Humboldt County in California.
    3 points
  4. I am out of town for Thanksgiving, just in time for an ANCIENT MURRELET to show up in Chattanooga Tennessee. (1st state record) Photos and details have not been posted yet, but here is a checklist. https://ebird.org/checklist/S155117315
    3 points
  5. Here is a pair of Cuddle Buddies (Common Ground Doves) from last winter (1-22) on day when it was chilly. Yes, NE Florida can get chilly. We even drop below freezing a few times each year. Also from our backyard.
    3 points
  6. Photos: https://ebird.org/checklist/S155118501
    2 points
  7. It was partially her idea, so we didn't have to sell it. I don't think she cares much about her independence. Her priority was to remain in her neighborhood, but she's tired of not being able to find her way anywhere (or back), and of having to deal with daily frustrations (bills, etc.). We discretely do all of the driving; at some point we'll try convincing her to sell her 2016 Honda CR-V.
    2 points
  8. Krider's wouldn't show that much red undernearth in the tail...right? Actual photos might be required.
    2 points
  9. My dad had trouble with directions later in life that caused quite a few problems. After living the later half of his life in California, my oldest brother convinced dad to move back to Canada where he had family to help care for him. Dad was very independent and preferred driving himself wherever he wanted to go, including from LA to Toronto, where he got turned around a few times but managed to find his way. While he had no trouble going to visit family and friends hours away when he was here, he often got confused when driving to and from local destinations and would call for help when he got turned around. In pursuit of more independence, dad moved from my eldest brothers house to my next oldest brother house. Dad had a hard time accepting the aging process and didn't want to acknowledge that he was simply getting too old to do certain things. Because we tried to restrict his driving, and because dad was dad, he ended packing up his SUV and driving back to California. I believe he made it as far as Ohio before getting turned around and needing to stop and call for help. My oldest brother flew from Toronto to Ohio and then drove dad the rest of the way to California and set him up in a seniors residence. Dad was stubborn and didn't accept help very well when it was offered, driving or otherwise, but I think the bigger problem was dad living under someone else's roof and not really feeling at home or in control of his own life. Hopefully by moving in with your mom she'll be in a better position to accept your help and keep a sense of independence at the same time.
    2 points
  10. Happy Thanksgiving, all! I turned some of my coloring book illustrations into colorable postcards! They also have fun bird facts on the back. Check them out at https://www.etsy.com/shop/colorbirdbooks.
    2 points
  11. Not many good photos today. Here's a Western Cattle Egret: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/611471800
    2 points
  12. LeConte’s Sparrow
    2 points
  13. Looks like it is available for pre-order now. https://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-North-American-Flycatchers/dp/0691240647/ref=zg_bsnr_g_16386_sccl_26/145-3741643-8023069?psc=1
    2 points
  14. Yes, the pattern looks consistent with Sandhill Cranes, and nothing else sounds like that. *walks away doing imitation*
    2 points
  15. Prairie Warbler https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/611417399
    2 points
  16. Driving up tomorrow. Hope it sticks 🙏🙏
    1 point
  17. Looked at it for so long till I could think of what that belongs to. birdie 🦅 #553: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    1 point
  18. Came across this one from 2016. If you look at it in maximum size, it might count.
    1 point
  19. Same birdie 🐦 #553: 🟥🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    1 point
  20. Super cooperative bird. Ratings Appreciated: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/611501365
    1 point
  21. birdie 🦉 #553: 🟥🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/ My first thought was right....of course I didn't go with it until I saw the legs
    1 point
  22. Bill shape is wrong for a vireo
    1 point
  23. Happy Thanksgiving or I hope everyone had a Happy Thanksgiving. I was surprised no one posted anything for this year. We are not celebrating until this afternoon because our granddaughter had to work Thanksgiving. I hope everyone gets out there birding today and burns off some of those Thanksgiving Calories. 🦃
    1 point
  24. Managed a Red-necked Grebe to get county total to 203. For about 30 seconds I thought I had a Western candidate. Sun was washing it out, and it had its neck extended quite a bit. It swam in amongst some Ring-billed Gulls, Goldeneyes and Herring Gull...so the size shot that down quick. Finally some pics and better scope looks showed me the error of my ways on the field marks too.
    1 point
  25. Its a waxwing, I blew the pic up on my puter and the wing bars are from the tree branch, it has a yellow tipped tail...
    1 point
  26. The birding gods need to face facts.
    1 point
  27. Why not waxing? Looks perfect for one to me. Yellow tip on the tail and all.
    1 point
  28. I wouldn't be surprised if today's bird ends up being one the bigger DUH moments in Birdie history.
    1 point
  29. Yes, the original bird-related meaning of "murmuration" was a flock of European Starlings, no matter how big the flock or what it was doing. The Oxford English Dictionary says it was invented around 1450 and was "One of many alleged group terms originating in late Middle English glossarial sources; found only in glossaries until revived and popularized in the mid-19th cent." In recent times (just this century?), videos of big flocks of starlings maneuvering in sync have become popular, and "murmuration" has come to mean a big dense flock of any species doing that. I guess it could spread to mean any big dense flock, but if it has, no one has told me. One of the OED's quotations is from the poet W. H. Auden: Patterns a murmuration of starlings Rising in joy over wolds unwittingly weave.
    1 point
  30. I’m afraid we won’t be able to ID these from the photos, but if you remember what they sounded like, check out recordings of Sandhill Cranes, and different goose species.
    1 point
  31. Not a chance - I think it is typically used for a flock of Starlings (maybe other species?) flying in synchronized patterns, usually in the evening (I would love to see this). @TomFuller Locally we have large numbers of birds flying in and out to roost in reed beds and adjacent trees during late summer and the fall. Individual flocks range from 50 to 2,000 (the largest I observed one morning) with totals in the multiple thousands. The smaller flocks are often, but not always, one species - usually Grackles, Red-winged and Starlings. Larger flocks are mostly a mix of the same species. If I am fairly close and and can differentiate I report estimates of species. If more distant but size is evident I report as "blackbird sp.". If really distant I report as "passerine sp."
    1 point
  32. Good point. I don’t know the actual definition of murmuration, but I believe that it usually involves a much larger number of birds than 500. I should’ve used the phrase “dense flock“. Thanks for the correction.
    1 point
  33. Mottled Owl at Santa Margarita Ranch in Starr County, Texas. https://ebird.org/checklist/S154949126. This is the same place that had/has the Bare-throated Tiger Heron. Also reported in recent days from the ranch is a Limpkin (they are everywhere it seems (except California)). eta: Potentially the second USA record of Mottled Owl!!
    1 point
  34. Watch for likes associated to the replies as another form of confirmation, @TomFuller. The more likes a suggested ID has, the more confidence you can have in that suggestion, usually. It's not the same as a verbal confirmation, but it is a common practice that has helped reduce the number of "I agree" posts that would often be repeated over and over again.
    1 point
  35. Today is (theoretically) the last day of my semi-professional career. One of my co-workers called me about a computer problem. When I got to his desk, instead of the problem, he gave me this. It measures about 2.5-feet square.
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. Belted Kingfisher: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/611402725
    1 point
  38. I agree with grackles. Here in central Tennessee we get MASSIVE flights of Robins this time of year, but they don’t really form tight flocks like this.
    1 point
  39. Gray-headed Swamphen https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/611379978
    1 point
  40. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/611363579
    1 point
  41. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/611292247
    1 point
  42. Yesterday - this heron looked quite pleased with itself whereas an adjacent one looked jealous and thought about trying for a steal. It took five minutes to get it down the hatch. Distant so heavy crops.
    1 point
  43. Yellow-rumped Warbler snacking on a fly.
    1 point
  44. First time spotting a Roadrunner - what a first impression...
    1 point
  45. 1 point
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