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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/26/2021 in Posts

  1. I think they confused eagles with porcupines…
    4 points
  2. One for fun from today, quite a look!!
    4 points
  3. That writing is almost too small for me to read!
    3 points
  4. I’m happy with how this Chickadee shot turned out despite the overcast conditions.
    2 points
  5. Things like thickness of streaking and gizz will come with more experience. It’s crazy how being around birds with make you be able to ID some of the trickier ones without thinking too hard!
    2 points
  6. Coyotes don’t pray as much in the winter? I didn’t know they prayed! Are they Christians?
    2 points
  7. @Seanbirdsthanks for the sentiment! Honestly, I had a great time regardless, was able to add 11 lifers, ID'd 50 species that day (with the help of some imported fancy birders from California there for the Spotted Rail), and generally just enjoyed the masked and socially distanced opportunity to run into some serious birders in real life for once. Lots of interesting people there (10 - 20 or so at any given point, spread out around the "75-Acre Lake" in question), so pretty new & exciting stuff to me in any case. Sadly, I didn't find any whatbird-ers out there, but I asked pretty much e
    2 points
  8. Lovely immature male Ruby-Throat! His red throat will grow in gradually. Also a tip: you shouldn't add red food coloring to the nectar. It is strongly suspected that it may be harmful to the birds because they drink huge quantities of nectar every day so the dose of color is much higher for them than for humans who drink colored drinks. It's not necessary - the birds will come to the feeder with clear nectar - so it's also not worth bothering with. Your feeder may have come with some nectar mix, which is usually colored; but it's ridiculously expensive to buy more. Just use plain white table s
    2 points
  9. 1. Gadwall 2. Least Sandpiper 3-4. Northern Pintail
    1 point
  10. I also met the Canada Jays at Crater Lake!
    1 point
  11. Hi, I saw both of these birds at Crater Lake National Park (Oregon) in Dec. 2020 Being an east coaster I have no idea what they are - any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
    1 point
  12. The bottom right I’d say is a female gadwall based on the white on the wing. The other duck is a Northern Pintail
    1 point
  13. Slaty-backed Gull
    1 point
  14. They often give me this look.. 🙂
    1 point
  15. Isn't the 2nd a chickadee??
    1 point
  16. Yes, this is a Cooper's.
    1 point
  17. I'm thinking the same thing.
    1 point
  18. Got 150 today! White faced ibis!
    1 point
  19. More stick than bird but wanted one where you could actually see the yellow rump
    1 point
  20. That's what we Vermonters call a heat wave! For @Aaron thats probably tropical weather!
    1 point
  21. Yeah, looks large, like a female. @Seanbirdshere it’s goes again, @BobAdamekwelcome to whatbird! Feel free to post on any of the forums here! It’s a great site!
    1 point
  22. I think this is a Cooper’s.
    1 point
  23. I think you're right. I'm just learning. Streaking are streaking 'til ya see it differently. I just learned about commas and dark patagial underwing markings as definitive for red-tailed; I've been just looking at tails all these years. Too, I just noticed the red-shouldered in the pic I posted from allaboutbirds.org has light eyes; perhaps not yellow, but light. 😃
    1 point
  24. I was going to say that Coopers can have a small supercilium as well, but usually RSHA have a much more noticeable one. I guess I forgot! Nice catch! The striping on a Coopers is much thinner, with less globular teardrops, if any. For the wing barring, I was trying to say that both Coopers and red-shouldered have it, with Coopers having it only on the underwing. I was trying to say that the barring we can see in the first two pics is of the underwing, not the ?top? of the secondaries like the pic you provided.
    1 point
  25. Okay, I can go with the shadowed eye. Thanks! Not so sure about the spots or barring thing though (see pic from allaboutbirds.org below). Seeing as this is Texas, I'm thinking B. l. texanus, and I've seen them, I live here, looking, at least to me, streaked, though it seems to extend onto the belly and the bird in pics 1 & 2 doesn't. I'm confused about pale eyebrows too. Like the pale eyebrows in pics 5 & 6? I agree on your assessment of the b & w wing checkering.
    1 point
  26. I use a Fenix tk35ue flash light, not camera flash which I think is too sudden and frightening for most birds. I've used it for several years and love it. It also has a powerful strobe option that confuses any unwanted visitors
    1 point
  27. My best photo of a Purple Finch yet!
    1 point
  28. Given the distance and possibility of the eye being shadowed, I don't think we can judge eye color here. A young RSHA would have spots or barring on the breast, depending on the subspecies, not streaks. Compare the streaks to the other Cooper's hawks pictured above (5&6). It would also have an obvious pale eyebrow if it was a RSHA. Young Cooper's hawks, can also show a speckled back, which can be seen in pic 4, but not in 1&2. The spots you see are banded flight feathers, which you can see in pic 6.
    1 point
  29. After clicking through to 1-2 and blowing them up, I'm not seeing any light color in the iris, and I think I am seeing black and white "checkering" on the wings. So Red-shouldered looks good to me on that one. The squirrel picture is brilliant!
    1 point
  30. We're back everyone! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjNB6VN1RFLp7pMG9aVqrMg/live
    1 point
  31. Canada jay, Clark's Nutcracker For the Canada Jay, note the small bill, dark cap, jay-like appearance. For the Nutcracker, note the overall gray coloration with the long, large bill.
    1 point
  32. Boy, the testosterone levels are high today. "My state's warbler list is bigger than yours!"
    1 point
  33. I wouldn’t trust this article too much. It says eagles are nocturnal
    1 point
  34. Well, there are at least three different birds here, with the last two being the same. First bird has a lot of red and streaking on the breast for a Hoary, but it is certainly frosty enough, though that darn stick is in front of the UnTC. I would leave that birds as a redpoll sp to be safe. Second bird has at least two streaks in the UnTC and some thick streaks on the flanks, so I would say Common. Third birds I’d leave as redpoll sp, although the streaking looks good. The beak doesn’t seem small enough, and there is at least one streak in the UnTC in what we can see of it, so it coul
    1 point
  35. This link takes you to the eBird record of species recorded in LA County. Warblers are near the very end, so you'll have to scroll a long way to get to the list of 42 species of New World warblers that have been recorded in the county. Enjoy! Bar Charts - eBird
    1 point
  36. I have 8 folders spread across 2 computers labeled Birbs 1, Birbs 2, Birb, Borbs, Floofs, Maui 2020, Maui Underwater, and Old Stuff
    1 point
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