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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/15/2019 in Posts

  1. 10 points
  2. 9 points
    Based on a recent post by @corgi, I'm starting this thread for people who simply want to share a photo and a story, and not be ignored, as what happens often to new posts. I tend to find myself not knowing where to post something simply because there isn't a thread for it, so here we are! Share a story, with a photo or video if you have one! I'll start: So here's something pretty cool... my family owns a cabin up in central Idaho, and there lives a ton of foxes! Last winter we had at least 8 on the lot at one time, including silver red foxes and normal red foxes. Photos of them: They can be super goofy at times too! Well, it was only a matter of time... and a strong mom decided to make a den on the line between us and our neighbor's. She successfully raised 4 pups one year, and 2 the next! She even had an issue with her eye at one time, we still don't know if she's blind in that eye or not... Looking bad: Recovered: The pups are the perfect puppy-kitten cross for those who can't decide which they like better!
  3. 7 points
  4. 7 points
    My first Golden Eagle - Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM
  5. 6 points
  6. 6 points
    Whoping Cranes 2015 Whopping Crane's international crane foundation. by johnd1964, on Flickr
  7. 5 points
  8. 4 points
    I actually emailed the Park to ask and this is their reply
  9. 4 points
  10. 3 points
    So Nat Geo and I aren't on the same page. This is what I get when the sun is shining directly into my lens and the subject is inside a dark place. I gotta wait for a cloudy day to try it again. I don't think this pair is going to be going anyplace. This is highly photoshopped!
  11. 3 points
    1. Red-tailed Hawk - the white speckling on the back is a good clue 2. Hermit Thrush indeed 3. Anhinga - with the white in the wings, small head, long thin dagger of a bill with a straight tip 4. Laughing Gull - with the dusky stuff on the head and the kinda dark gray mantle
  12. 3 points
    This is a Hermit. The best hint is time of year; while Hermit can be found year-round in much of California, Swainson's only breeds here and is mostly absent late October - early April. You'll also notice the eye-ring and pale parts on the cheek and throat are whitish, rather than the general buffy wash across this area that Swainson's have. The dark loral/supraloral area is also a good hint - Swainson's have more of a spectacle than an eye-ring, with the area between the eye and the bill a pale buffy.
  13. 3 points
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
  16. 2 points
    I am uncertain what this diving bird is. Taken in Northern California USA in November 2019. Thank you for your assistance.
  17. 2 points
  18. 1 point
  19. 1 point
    Larger than Ring-billed, less distinct patterning than either Black-backed, plus location suggests Herring Gull to me.
  20. 1 point
    Yes, Wood Thrush. Forster’s, due to the light gray primaries. Semipalmated, due to the white eyering, lack of evident rufous, and relatively blunt beak. Looks like a pure Mottled, due to the black patch at the base of the bill and no white around the speculum patch.
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    Female gulls tend to have smaller, more slender bills than males, plus there is individual variation. 1st cycle Iceland Gulls usually have an all or mostly black bill, maybe a little pinkish but just at the base and without the sharp demarcation.
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
    All taken today in lousy rainy weather in south jersey. Thanks in advance... Ipswich savannah? Saltmarsh or nelsons? looks like enough yellow wash for nelsons but I am not sure this might be the same bird Lapland longspur?
  25. 1 point
    Cormorant is Neotropic. Gallinule is Purple. For the geese, I see three Ross’s. The two circled and the 5th bird from the left on the bottom.
  26. 1 point
    Didn't realize the last 4 photos were a different bird. The first two photos are Long-billed for the reasons I said above but I'm unsure about the other bird. The tertials aren't completely plain and I it's not super close to full basic plumage (Long-billed molts first).
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
    Hi Corgi, I usually get on the forum later and don't spend a whole lotta time on most occasions. I don't comment too much but did enjoy your post! G
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    Today in the morning I was running in Brickell Key, Miami and after I finished, I saw a bird that caught my attention, because it looked beautiful. I took some photos and I just sit there watching it and watching the sun and water, after a couple of minutes, I noticed that the bird was approaching little by little until it came really close and start like playing with me, it got into my arm and then into my shoulder. I have videos too, I believe that the bird escaped from somewhere, so I decided to take it home and try to find the owner, I put my finger in his legs and he climbed, so I walked home with him, when I was about to enter my building, the entrance door of the building is a metal one and makes a weird sound when you open it, so when I opened it, the bird got scared and flew away very high and far and I lost sight of it. I published this photos in the Nextdoor App in order to let the owner know where the bird is. But I wonder if you can identify the bird and let me know which type is it? I really do not have any idea, but he had a sweet singing as well.
  31. 1 point
    Today in the morning I was running in Brickell Key, Miami and after I finished, I saw a bird that caught my attention, because it looked beautiful. I took some photos and I just sit there watching it and watching the sun and water, after a couple of minutes, I noticed that the bird was approaching little by little until it came really close and start like playing with me, it got into my arm and then into my shoulder. I have videos too, I believe that the bird escaped from somewhere, so I decided to take it home and try to find the owner, I put my finger in his legs and he climbed, so I walked home with him, when I was about to enter my building, the entrance door of the building is a metal one and makes a weird sound when you open it, so when I opened it, the bird got scared and flew away very high and far and I lost sight of it. I published this photos in the Nextdoor App in order to let the owner know where the bird is. But I wonder if you can identify the bird and let me know which type is it? I really do not have any idea, but he had a sweet singing as well.
  32. 1 point
    thanks for identifying it!, I hope that his owner can recover it! because I think that the bird is missing him/her
  33. 1 point
    Thanks, again. I see chipping now. the black isnt shadow,no sun there today to create shadows,it was raining like the dickens though.
  34. 1 point
    I will add to E-bird now. Thank you.
  35. 1 point
    And the two Turkey Vultures in the second photo.
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    There doesn't seem to be any reddish coloring to the wings at all. Usually the rufous coloring of the wings is very noticeable on Swamps.
  38. 1 point
    It's a really good bird this far south in CT. Northern Shrikes are somewhat regular in Northern CT in winter, but pretty rare in the southern counties. Nice find! I would definitely put this in eBird.
  39. 1 point
    #2 is definitely a Leach's Storm Petrel. Note the long, more angled wings (the arms are short while the hands are long), pale carpal-bar across the whole wing, long, deeply forked tail, and while watching it, the distinctive nighthawk-like bouncy flight. Also, like Charlie was saying, based on the date and location, the Leach's would by far be the most likely "white-rumped" storm-petrel there.
  40. 1 point
    Not quite. Bills are too long for Cackling. Small Canadas or hybrids.
  41. 1 point
    Maybe Dark-eyed Junco?? 🙂
  42. 1 point
    Found at Lake Murray....great spot for birding! Here's the ebird listing https://ebird.org/hotspot/L3675490
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
    Adult golden eagle. Lucky! Don’t have one on my life list yet!
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    White-throated Sparrow by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
  48. 1 point
    Nashville Warbler (only my fourth warbler. The others are: Yellow Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and Common Yellowthroat)
  49. 1 point
    Cedar Waxwing Cedar Waxwing by Johnny, on Flickr
  50. 0 points
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