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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/29/2024 in all areas

  1. Great Egret. 78th St. Crab Dock, Oak Island, Brunswick County, southeastern coastal NC. https://ebird.org/checklist/S177786335 I think I got the lighting closer to right on this one. The white areas aren't as badly blown out as what I usually produce, and the bird gave me time to do a little composition. Of the three shots I kept, this one has the most feathers being blown. No cropping or adjustments; straight out of the camera's .JPG. Three seconds later a large boat passed in the background on the Intracoastal Waterway.
    2 points
  2. I still know very little about photoshop, and using Adobe Camera Raw's suggested auto fix settings for white balance and color doesn't always produce the best results, but I used all the AI suggestions for this one, and I'm very happy with the output. I welcome thoughts and suggestons. https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/619735182
    2 points
  3. I spent a lot of time taking Indian Peafowl Photos today. I like the way this one came out the best. The pic would be much more spectacular if the bird didn't blend in with its surroundings, but it's still pretty cool: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/619696215
    2 points
  4. Sorry, but how could I possibly choose between these two? https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/619752180 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/619752179
    1 point
  5. I also don’t suggest relying heavily on the auto suggestions. It rarely does a good job
    1 point
  6. @lonestranger asked me recently about birds in my new yard, and I wondered how it compared to my old one. I define 'yard' the same as most of you - if I'm on my property and I can see or hear it, it counts. We were in our Lexington, SC, home for over 20 years. It was in a neighborhood with few native trees (it was leveled when developed), adjacent to agricultural fields, in the middle of the state. I defined the neighborhood patch as including the yard, the rest of the suburban subdivision, the adjoining farm pond and fields, and small freshwater marsh. While we moved to Brunswick County, NC, in April, my parents have lived in this neighborhood part-time for almost 20 years, full-time for the last five. We're moving into the house they built five years ago, so my life list for this properly includes weekend visits back to April 2019. Here in coastal NC, the house on a small tidal marsh, adjacent to an estuary, in a neighborhood where it practically takes a 3/4 majority of both houses and writ from the Pope before you can cut down a tree. Oaks, live oaks, and pines over 40 feet abound, even more so on the lots that haven't been build on yet. Obviously, I'm getting wider range of backyard species and flyovers / flybys. My neighborhood patch includes Mom and Dad's first and second houses, along with the neighborhood's two fishing piers, a freshwater pond, and small island of high ground in the middle of the tidal salt marsh. So, Lexington SC yard list - 87 species, 403 complete checklists, over 20 full-time years Brunswick NC yard list - 72 species, 64 checklists, over 5 very-part-time years Lexington County - 165 Lexington SC neighborhood patch - 118 species, 527 checklists over 20 full-time years Brunswick NC neighborhood patch - 109 species, 135 checklists over 20 part-time years. Brunswick County - 135 I've recorded my last bird for the Lexington yard and patch. We're Tarheels now, according to our drivers' licenses. Time to get busy on the Brunswick yard and patch!
    1 point
  7. birdie 🦉 #739: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    1 point
  8. birdie 🦃 #739: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    1 point
  9. birdie 🦉 #739: 🟩⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛ https://birdiegame.net/
    1 point
  10. I was thinking female on the Junco as the males I have seen have almost black heads. This does look darker than most of the females I've seen so I don't know 🤷‍♂️
    1 point
  11. I think it's safe to call that an adult female Wild Turkey, especially if you saw it with a younger bird. I'd be hesitant to say that in a month or so from now, but the juveniles should be obvious this early in the season.
    1 point
  12. You got all the species right! I don’t know if it’s possible to sex Steller’s Jays or California Towhees. The junco looks like a male of the Oregon subspecies, but I’m not confident.
    1 point
  13. Strikes me as a young starling, but wait for someone else to confirm. I haven't actually seen a young starling yet this year in Colorado.
    1 point
  14. Henslow's Sparrow https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/619690401
    1 point
  15. Willet. Mouth of the Cape Fear River, New Hanover County, southeastern coastal NC. April 2024. https://ebird.org/checklist/S169019301 I'm catching up some recent photos. This was from the first of what I hope will be many 'commute by ferry' trips (trip report https://ebird.org/tripreport/222918).
    1 point
  16. Finally got a good photo of a Yellow Warbler!! https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/619657118
    1 point
  17. Orchard Oriole: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/619642381
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. I don’t see why it’s not a warbling
    1 point
  20. Maybe not the best but interesting. Black tern diving into lake
    1 point
  21. Atlantic puffin from a trip, too long ago, to Bar Harbor, Maine. Hoping to go back soon to get a better picture
    1 point
  22. Brown Thrasher. Lockwood Folly estuary, Brunswick County, southeastern coastal NC. https://ebird.org/checklist/S175709874
    1 point
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