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Jodi Nielson

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Posts posted by Jodi Nielson

  1. Took these a couple days ago at Lost River Cave in Warren Co, KY and am now in a quandary over-thinking what I'm looking at.   My initial thought was Chipping Sparrow.  But then the brow looked yellowish as well as the undertail.  So I moved on to Palm Warbler, but that doesn't feel right either.  So now I'm just confused....lol.  Share some brilliant insight with me please....  Thanks

    1007605925_sparrowlrc.JPG.f763299f03974e343e02ee6a4b3b2e22.JPG1976365561_sparrowlrc2.JPG.667b632832322b5817555bade128432b.JPG217898112_sparrowlrc3.JPG.b930a76fe1183f59e153535c0578b950.JPG2119153108_sparrowlrc4.JPG.323ae5daf920360d5d6bf74d1228f145.JPG

  2. Taken today, Warren Co., KY at Lost River Cave.  I was watching some female Red-winged Blackbirds by a retention pond but I thought this one was different.  Magnolia Warbler, up in the trees, bad lighting.   1.  Magnolia Warbler  2.  Northern Waterthrush Thanks

    594928635_magnoliawarbler5022.JPG.e7ac8bf67971acf2e04490fe9f967b0b.JPG1069749015_Northernwaterthrush5022.JPG.289d19d710ce501ef3214bc905f7eb4b.JPG

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  3. In my opinion, nests are architectural wonders. The Eastern Phoebes primarily used moss.  The Blue-gray Gnatcatchers I was watching today used tree lichen.  Mud, spider webs, grasses all woven together to create safe havens for eggs and hatchlings.  After watching the Gnatcatchers, it made me wonder why any given species chooses the materials they use.  

    Are there any studies or research projects regarding why they prefer one thing over another?  Ten different species could nest in the same acre and all use different materials, even though the same materials are available to all of them.  Locations are another question.  Ground, trees, eaves, cavities, open, sheltered.  Just curious....

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