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lonestranger

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Posts posted by lonestranger

  1. 10 hours ago, IKLland said:

    Well, it’s just that those species were all over.....

    Keep in mind that a person can see a species of bird their whole life but it wouldn't become a lifer until after they started birding,Β learned how to identify the bird and put a name to it, and then added it to their list.

    Lifers accumulate differently for all birders, the American Robin was the first bird I ever identified with a field guide and would be my first lifer on my list, if I kept one, I'm sure it's not the first bird on every other birder's list though. πŸ˜‰

    • Like 4
  2. BRDL 285
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    πŸͺΆπŸ₯šπŸ₯šπŸͺΆ
    🐦🐦πŸ₯šπŸ¦
    🐦🐦πŸ₯šπŸ¦
    🐦🐦🐦🐦

  3. BRDL 284
    πŸ₯šπŸ¦πŸ₯šπŸ₯š
    πŸ₯šπŸ¦πŸ₯šπŸ₯š
    πŸ₯šπŸ¦πŸ₯šπŸ₯š
    πŸ₯šπŸ¦πŸ₯šπŸ₯š
    🐦🐦πŸ₯šπŸ₯š
    🐦🐦🐦🐦

  4. 3 hours ago, Tbrown said:

    Really nice photos and technique. What's the camera you're using for those(was thinking about getting night vision anyway, so might aswell)? Been thinking about buying one for some time and since it's holiday season soon I might treat myself πŸ˜„
    Regarding OP's post: I'm using Vortex 8x42, works pretty well for me!

    I use Canon's R6 with the RF 100-500mm. The camera's 102,400 ISO capability definitely helps with night vision viewing.

    • Like 2
  5. 1 hour ago, lonestranger said:

    I can go out in near total darkness long before the sun is up and adjust my exposure so that my view is bright enough to see what my eyes can't see on their own. It's during those really early outings that I use my camera like night vision goggles and scan the trees for owls,

    For those that haven't experimented much with high ISO, I suggest testing your camera's night vision capabilities if you're up before, or after, you can typically see details in your surroundings. It probably won't work in total darkness but you might be able to see things as the day starts to brighten but long before the sun hits the horizon. If you forget about taking pictures and just use your electronic viewfinder, or live view on the LCD screen, you may be surprised what your camera can see that you can't. If you put your camera on manual, set your ISO to maximum, set your Aperture to it's smallest number, and then crank your Shutter Speed way down toward minimum, you might be lucky enough to find something lurking in the darkness.Β 

    I know that I am working with upper end equipment so others may not have the same results, but your individual results may just surprise you the way my results first surprised me.

    This first shot was taken at 7:57am yesterday morning just as the sun is coming up.

    DL6A1413.thumb.jpg.8bc5089ec8b004ae15f5c8d50ecff821.jpg

    Β 

    This previous shot was taken 44 minutes earlier, at 7:13:06am,Β long beforeΒ sunrise.

    DL6A1404.thumb.jpg.3c4eb75ae8a978c61012a15da8411316.jpg

    Β 

    After setting my camera to what I now call night vision mode and only 42 seconds later at 7:13:48am, this is the view I had of my surroundings.

    DL6A1405.thumb.jpg.669fdf02cfded0b9602ea75473038f4d.jpg

    Β 

    I know it's not something that everyone will try, but if you've always wanted night vision, this might be worth looking into as an alternative. The better your gear, the earlier/later you should be able to see in the near darkness.

    • Like 2
  6. We have 2 pair of 8x42 but I seldom use either of them. The Bushnells are MJ's go to pair, which are inferior to my newer Eagle Optics but she continues to use the older Bushnells. πŸ€·πŸΌβ€β™‚οΈΒ 

    I myself prefer to use my mirrorless camera with the electronic viewfinder as my view magnifier most of the time. Familiarity makes it easy for me to quickly focus where I want when AF fails me. The lens' zoom feature is handy but sometimes it's advantageous to use the viewfinder's zoom magnification too, taking the magnification well beyond any binoculars I've seen, with the bonus of image stabilization.

    The biggest advantage I find with my camera over binoculars is being able to adjust exposure. I can compensate for birds with bright backlighting or birds in dark shadows with the camera and see details that I'd never be able to see with binoculars. I can go out in near total darkness long before the sun is up and adjust my exposure so that my view is bright enough to see what my eyes can't see on their own. It's during those really early outings that I use my camera like night vision goggles and scan the trees for owls, unsuccessfully but I keep looking because I can. Since my scans of treelines and bushes are just scans and not viewing marathons, the weight difference isn't really a factor. When my viewing time is going to run non-stop for extended lengths of time, well, that's when I will reach for the binoculars and settle for what I think is a lesser view.

    • Like 1
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