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lonestranger

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Everything posted by lonestranger

  1. Wild Turkey was my first thought, but that's just based on the vibe I get from the photo, not because of any discernible ID features.
  2. That is not unique to other birding sites, it happens here on Whatbird too. Some birds are initially misidentified by enthusiastic members that want to be the first to guess the right ID, without knowing that they don't have the skill to do so accurately. Sometimes it's newer birders testing their skill and sometimes it's birders that think they know more than they actually do. The wrong ID is usually corrected, and usually pretty quickly, but I am sure there are occasions when the initial ID is viewed and accepted as accurate without the thread being revisited to see the corrections. I don't frequent other bird forums so I can't say why this one is better than others, but we aren't immune to people making IDs without having any experience or personal knowledge of the bird. Just saying.
  3. This link might help you in your list making decisions, @IKLland. It's the ABA's guidelines/rules for submitting lists, which, unless I am mistaken, are the same guidelines that most serious birders follow when counting or listing birds. I'm not one of those serious birders, I'm a bird watcher not a bird counter/lister, but I'm sure those that are listers/counters will correct me if I'm wrong. ABA rules/guidelines are the standard in the birding community. https://www.aba.org/aba-recording-rules-and-interpretations/
  4. 3(male hoodies in the photo) + 1(not pictured) = 4(male hoodies courting 1 female).
  5. I was just fishing with a hook on the end of a stick when all of a sudden I caught a fish. As soon as I pulled the fish out of the water this Osprey swooped down and took my fish away. That's my story and I'm sticking to it!. 🤥
  6. I am curious @Charlie Spencer, did you get your new camera for Christmas? If so, what did you finally decide on, the P950? How's the manual focus working for you, is it what you were hoping for as far as ease of use goes? Let us know your first impressions, good and bad. I know you haven't had it long but I am sure you've figured out what you really like so far, and what you don't like, if anything. Curious minds want to know. Hmmm, maybe putting an "s" on "minds" is stretching it a bit. 🤔
  7. Welcome to WhatBird, @Peter H. I think you have to download the Photo Sleuth app for iBird but I have no idea how it works. Try this link for more info. https://forums.whatbird.com/index.php?app=core&module=system&controller=redirect&do=advertisement&ad=4&key=cacbfda796fa4277a1cb928d6c2dba91047d9dacf04af1b5261da2908ff86c6e You can always upload your photos to the ID forum for help with bird IDs.
  8. I agree, very tough to pick just one photo as my best ever. I have photos with close ups of Owls, photos with Loons dancing on the water, photos with baby birds being fed, photos with birds in flight, photos with birds in fights, photos with birds bathing and splashing, etc., so you might wonder why I'd pick a Blue Jay feeder shot as my best photo ever. Well, some tough choices come down to just one deciding factor....eeny meeny miny moe. 🤪
  9. I agree that Belted Kingfisher's are tough to photograph. I got lucky with this shot shortly after joining Whatbird back in 2009, and have not gotten a decent photo of one since.
  10. This probably my closest closeup, taken back in 2014. 800mm(400mm + 2x extender) from about 12-15 feet away.
  11. I had that combination and loved it. The 100-400mm mark 2 is a beautiful lens to work/play with. I particularly liked the close minimum focus distance of only 3 feet, made it a great lens for frame filling closeups of dragonflies, butterflies, caterpillars, frogs, snakes, and all the other small stuff that you would usually use a macro lens for.
  12. I've seen them leave a trail before, it even had some red in it. 😁
  13. You can access multiple pages with multiple articles of Tony's from this link https://cobirds.org/Publications/InTheScope.aspx
  14. Hold still, I'll use this twig to pick that thing out of your nose.
  15. Nice photos, @Aidan B. Might I suggest that you separate your photos by leaving a blank line between each image you're posting. When I first saw your photos, I thought your Vulture was soaring over the water of the second photo until I scrolled far enough to see the Gull and realized they were two separate images. The blank line between images just makes it easier to see where one photo ends and the next one begins.
  16. Who knew you could smear mascara all the way down there.
  17. Mine doesn't look anything like a feather duster.
  18. Why? There's not even a bird in the post to identify and you're bumping it? Again, I ask why?
  19. Be careful where you walk guys, it looks like the last flock through here left land mines of the squishy kind behind.
  20. I've had nuthatches and chickadees feeding from my hand and ALMOST had a Downy feeding from my hand. He kept taking seed from the feeder he was on and my hand was right there touching the feeder, about two inches from his belly. He seemed quite comfortable with me being there, just not comfortable enough to take the seed I was offering. One thing to keep in mind when feeding birds by hand, or attracting them to your feeders, is the copycat effect. Once you get one bird comfortable enough to take seed from your hand/feeder, a lot of other birds will follow the leader so be patient and wait for more birds to see the activity. Birds attract other birds and once the food source is established to a few birds, other birds will start to view it as a safe food source too. The more regular you are with offering seed by hand, the more regular birds you're going to attract and those regulars will attract new and different birds. I am not patient enough for the birds to come to my hand on a regular basis, but it's a thrill when it does happen. I tip my hat to @The Bird Nuts for having the patience/persistence to get personal with Dorothy, I'm sure the reward was worth the effort. And for those that don't know, patiently sitting/standing still with a hand full of seed can take a lot more effort than you might think.
  21. I suggest that you try holding a handful of seed up beside your feeder before refilling them. If your birds are like mine, some will come close to the feeder while it's being filled, these are the birds most likely to feed from your hand, and most likely to do it when the feeders are empty or taken down. It takes patience and you might not be successful the first time, but the birds will eventually look at you as just another bird feeder, if you're persistent enough.
  22. I respectfully disagree with @Charlie Spencer, @IKLland. I get woodpeckers to my seed feeders all the time. In fact, I've found the Downy and Hairy woodpeckers prefer my BOSS feeders over the suet feeders. While both Downy and Hairy will hit the suet feeders briefly, they'll linger on the BOSS feeders and eat and eat and eat and eat........ Now I'll admit that we don't put out the top of the line suet, which might change the birds preference, but they prefer BOSS over cheap suet in my area, most of the time. I like the wire mesh feeders because of their capacity for lots of birds all at once, and because the birds need to linger long enough to pull the seeds through the mesh, there also seems to be less spillage. Here's a few, of MANY, photos of the woodpeckers going to my seed feeders, including a Red-bellied Woodpecker.
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