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Paulster

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  1. Got these two shots mid-morning today, assumed it was a Red-breasted Sapsucker, which I have see at this location. But the head looks wrong. Is this just a weird molt?
  2. Saw this bird circle several times above Toad Mountain, then fly off with a second similar-looking bird. Thanks for your ideas.
  3. This bird routinely feeds at feeders in Santa Cruz County near Rio Rico, AZ. Is it a female Costa's Hummingbird? Thanks for your help.
  4. Good point about the seeds. The White-winged Crossbills last week were feeding in evergreens, which I think is more common.
  5. I definitely am more comfortable with that than the White-winged Crossbill. I saw a flock last week of them and they moved the same way as this flock, which had lots of American Goldfinches in it. Thanks again.
  6. By Jove, you might be on to something there. 😉 Thanks for the reality check.
  7. Saturday 12/22 late morning, western Whatcom County, in mixed evergreen and conifer forest, a mixed flock was crawling all over the seed cones. Many were American Goldfinch, but I wonder if the striped belly indicates a possible White-winged Crossbill? There also was one likely Warbler with lots of black and white striping (Yellow Rumped? Black-throated Gray?). They moved fast and flitted from tree to tree. Sorry the pictures aren’t better, and thanks for your help.
  8. Thanks for weighing in. While the bill is odd, the plumage seems spot on.
  9. First, may I blame spellcheck for posting Eastern instead of Western Washington? Second, Psweet, I like your suggestion that it’s a young Cowbird. I took a picture of an adult Brown-headed Cowbird later on the same walk, on the other side of the lake. Many thanks for your help.
  10. Saw this likely juvenile at Toad Lake in Bellingham, Washington yesterday morning. It acted like a juvenile, in that it didn’t fly away for a minute or so. The lack of breast streaks would seem to rule out our most prominent local sparrow, White-crowned and Song.
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