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Hasan

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Everything posted by Hasan

  1. To rephrase, I should probably not ever use the phrase 'pretty clearly' in reference to Mexican Duck. I'm no authority on Mexican and it can have a somewhat dark breast but imo a bird with this much contrast and a clean dark breast should raise some flags.
  2. Geez. That should not have been confirmed. It's pretty clear that's not a pure Mexican
  3. Given that the breast is a contrasting solid brown, I'm be fairly confident this a hybrid imo
  4. I'm saying that I personally wouldn't put that gull to a species. It looks off for a Herring, but Glaucous-winged hybridizes extensively and is very rare east of the coast.
  5. They are Brewer's/Rusty Blackbirds but without better photos I wouldn't call it to species
  6. Not quite sure what Tony's on about- if there's absolutely no red at the base of the primaries and tail it simply cannot be a Pyrrhuloxia. The very drabbest example: https://ebird.org/checklist/S33757099 Female Phainopepla can have the appearance, as this one does, of a dark area surrounding the eye when viewed from certain angles.
  7. Ah, just came across this photo I have that settles it. Thanks all.
  8. Came across this weird looking duck which I presume is a Black Duck. What's throwing me for a loop, however, is the lack of any sort of facial contrast or distinction between the head and the body. There's also this weird light color in front of the bill. If it's a black duck, what's its age/sex and what's with the lack of contrast?
  9. These are rather long-tailed with a little white on the middle of wings- Hooded Mergs.
  10. 4 looks like a Ringer, and I suspect that 3 is a LBBG.
  11. Red, apologies. Head got ahead of my fingers, I guess
  12. Leucistic Common Grackle.
  13. This is a Phainopepla- notice the lack of at the base of the primaries and the tail.
  14. Regarding the first bird, given the inherent difficulties with this particular species, I don't think that these would be alone identifiable. Herring is most likely here.
  15. 4 is not a Pacific Loon. It's a Common- notice the massive bill. Structurally, Pacific is very similar to Red-throated.
  16. It's a gull, and I might hazard a guess of Western Gull given the amount of black on the wingtips, but the pics leave much to be desired.
  17. Not much of it. I drove through the panhandle which was dry grasslands with buttes. Caracaras live in the south east of the state, however, which I imagine is quite green and increasingly tropical as one goes south.
  18. Lol if this is upstate NY I'll cut off my arm and eat it. I'm not even convinced this is the US, I could be wrong but this doesn't really look any of the areas in AZ where this bird hangs out, and I think TX would be greener than this
  19. Yeah, this isn't going to be identifiable without a photo. Ferruginous Hawk can also have the appearance of a white rump
  20. Regarding Costa's, though this bird does look rather bulky to my eye, I'll actually concur here upon second review- my call was likely too hasty
  21. @AlexHenry Is there a reason to go for hybrid here? Structure looks fine, plumage doesn't scream hybrid to me. I suppose we can't rule out a hybrid but at least a fair percentage of all the birds we identify on this forum we can't technically rule out some sort of hybrid.
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