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flightman

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  1. That's true and the taxonomy has changed over time. According to Birds of the World, in 1998, the American Ornithologists' Union "recognized the 4 groups at informal rank of subspecies group and suggested that, based on genetic evidence the 4 groups at informal rank of subspecies group and suggested that, based on genetic evidence and morphology (including plumage coloration), the 4 groups each may represent a biological species. Before these groups are recognized as separate species, additional study is needed in contact zones between groups, ..."

    As you know, all four subspecies groups have common names; Red, Sooty, Thick-billed, and Slate-colored.

    We had a similar situation here a few months ago when a Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's), quite distinct from Myrtles which are very common here, was seen for a few weeks. Birders were disappointed that we could not count it as a lifer

     

  2. I saw this bird (last photo) up in a bare tree in Jones Beach NY on Dec. 2. I thought it was a juvenile Cooper's Hawk. Looking at the photo, though, I think it might be a Sharpie. I know that Sharpies have smaller heads, skinny legs, and squarer tails, but exactly how much? Over the last few years, I have seen several juveniles and thought that they were all Cooper's, but now I am not sure. The bird in flight is the same one perched on a roof. I'm not sure about the sizes. Are any of these Sharpies? The flying bird certainly looks like it has a square tail.

    coopers_hawk-6.jpg

    coopers_hawk-09.jpg

    coopers_hawk-10.jpg

    coopers_hawk-13.jpg

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