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Caley Thomas 2.0

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  1. Though I'm far from confident on my ID based on the photo in question, I've never seen Red-winged Blackbirds with white wings before (are you thinking it's a trick of the light here?).
  2. Agree with unidentifiable, but from what I could see (at 25% speed), is that the birds seemed like they may be loosely 'kettling' (a vertically oriented cone of circling birds at varying heights, generally drifting in the direction of migration), a term roughly defining the flying pattern which you described, which is typically used to describe the group flight pattern of certain hawk species while migrating....I've never seen Sandhill Cranes fly in this pattern, and normally you can hear Sandhill Crane's distinctive call even before you see them (look up their sound and you'll know if you heard them or not, if you don't already know it). Gun to my head, hawk sp, but best left unidentifiable I'm afraid.
  3. What makes you think these birds are particularly sexually promiscuous I'm wondering? lol
  4. I'm not seeing the green, but I'm not saying this is not a Henslow's either. This bird is very confusing to me. The post-ocular eyeline is so strong on this one which seems to point to Henslow's, but the apparent lack of lighter colored fringes of the back feathers and for me the lack of green makes me second guess this idea, which is why I was wondering about immature/juvenile...
  5. Were you at a known stomping ground for this bird (like the park / nature area place with Bush in the name in West Houston, for example)? Also, are we suggesting that this is a juvenile Henslow's (because it looks a bit off to me for an adult based on this photo alone)?
  6. It seems like a perfectly reasonable name error given that it's a relative to the Little Blue Heron which has the "little" as part of its name, and this one is about the same size if not smaller to its aforementioned relative. I suppose one could argue, however, that the only reason the Little Blue Heron name includes "little", is because it is needed to differentiate it from the "Great" Blue Heron...
  7. I finally watched the video itself, and it sure sounds like Red-shouldered hawks to me being mobbed by crows. Visually, I'll pass on either of the birds for ID, other than to say that neither are eagles for sure. Given the visual correlation to the calls being heard by the raptor(s) in question, however, I ultimately agree with Red-shouldered for at least one of them.
  8. I'm pretty limited in my experience with Bald Eagles, but probably safely sub-adult of some sort here...
  9. The shape of the open wings makes me think eagle (straight profile instead of dihedryl).
  10. I agree with #3 being an Eastern Phoebe, pass on the rest.
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