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chica

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Everything posted by chica

  1. I'm not so sure . . . least's are always described as having a 'complete bold eyering'; this bird clearly lacks that. The primary projection is not long; more moderate to short - 'shorter' leaning more least, but again, no eyering. I'd lean willow (or alder) - but unless it's singing - probably not gonna achieve absolute id
  2. As no one has ventured an id yet - I'm leaning toward red-shouldered hawk; fairly common in that area and the 'transparent' - (lighter) patch toward the tip of the wing is pretty characteristic of this species. I see why you'd lean toward accipiter - with the pointier wings but a hawk taking off or trying to gain altitude will be pumping the wings hard and are not always 'flared' as they are when soaring; giving the impression more accipiter-like. Just my 2 cents . . .
  3. Always follow your gut - in my experience it is rarely wrong (at least i can say that about 'my' gut! ;-)))) )
  4. I've always had trouble with purple finch (vs house - seems silly but . . .). I have no trouble with cassin's, but purple always seems to catch me. Taken this a.m. Milw WI - from a great distance - you'll have to download the image and expand to see this bird clearly. I didn't want to get closer and risk it flying off. I see much red on the nape and back - too much for a house finch - but no red on wings.
  5. I'm gonna lead sharpie too; coarser streaking on breast and a squarish tail (though it does look long). tough call
  6. Re: willow/alder - you pretty much can't distinguish - generally. My first thought was willow, but the eye-ring is a little more prominent than I've seen in known willow flycatchers. Not a Least - eye-ring is too small (imho). And the slight yellowish belly also leads me back to alder.
  7. This is going to be harsh - but Don't feed it. Humanely euthanize it - it is a starling: they are Not native to North America and they compete with our native birds for nest sites (woodpeckers, flickers, particularly bluebirds among others). I've been fighting with a pair over a nest cavity for more than 1 month - so far they are winning. They kicked a pair of red-bellied woodpeckers out from the hole the woodpeckers excavated. When a N. flicker tried to use the hole, the starlings kicked the flicker's butt too! Personally, I'd much rather have woodpeckers and flickers than starlings. You can euthanize it humanely by putting it in a plastic bag and hold the bag up to your car exhaust and fill the bag with exhaust (carbon monoxide poisoning). Only takes a few seconds - very quick. Preferably with a cold engine so the exhaust is not so hot. Please don't ban me for suggesting this. Chica
  8. Hmmmm ... well - there certainly seems to be a consensus on solitary sandpiper. Both NG and Sibley show much more streaking on the breast and sides (edges of sides really); and that kinda threw me; and there just aren't that many spots!. I'm not usually stumped but this one got me! Thanks so much chica
  9. Thinking yellow-legs - lesser - but not enough spotting and color of legs is questionably 'yellow' - lots of algae on feet (maybe legs). Bigger than a spotted sandpiper - which I'm very familiar with. Taken in Milwaukee WI - May 10. thanks for your help
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