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Aveschapines

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Everything posted by Aveschapines

  1. Now that you've looked at a bunch of woodpeckers, do they seem like the right KIND of bird? Was your bird's bill similar in shape (maybe longer or shorter but long, straight, pointed, sturdy)? What doesn't fit for the species that have been suggested? Another thing: it's very hard to judge the size of birds in the field. The feeder for comparison helps but we've all been fooled!
  2. Welcome to WhatBird! Northern Flicker maybe? Although you didn't mention the red/yellow colors so probably not.
  3. I'll be nice and not mention the daytime temps here (at night it's in the high 20s).
  4. Would you like me to delete the duplicates? (At least you got my attention...)
  5. I'm also going to go with @lonestranger's opinion here.
  6. Just to clarify - Kevin and I gave each other badges just to figure out how it works 😄
  7. They forgot the nicest tit of all - Bushtit!
  8. I agree with Yellow-Throated Warbler. It does look a bit orangey but I think it's fine. (I was trying to figure out what Spotted species was being suggested in the title!)
  9. So, he was hunting for lizards but caught an insect. Like when you go to the kitchen looking for leftover chocolate cake but only find a banana.
  10. Oh, cool! I like purple 😜 (Then you can make one of those Facebook memes about how gorgeous nature is with your purple flycatchers, green and yellow robins, and rainbow hummingbirds...)
  11. Yes, those look better, and I could see some yellow in the original photos too. 😄
  12. I'd call that a Dusky-Capped if I saw it here, well out of range for Yucatan (which I've never seen), especially if I had confirmed more yellow on the underparts than is obvious in these photos. Dusky-Capped are much more drab than Great Crested on the upperparts (wings/back/tail). For what it's worth, Merlin says that local populations of Dusky-Capped are very hard to distinguish from Yucatan, and they are best differentiated by voice.
  13. (There's something that has been kind of bumming the world out for two years; an improvement in that situation would pretty much help everyone!)
  14. That's normal for us this time of year - lows in the 20s and highs in the 70s. In March when the cold and hot seasons bump up against each other it can be in the low 20s at night and 80 at midday!
  15. Happy New Year everyone! We can't have this sub-forum empty all year so big thanks to Kevin for taking care of that! Hope all had a great year and that 2022 is even better. There are some obvious ways that could be very easy to accomplish! I always get my first bird while I'm still in bed, and it's always a hummingbird. I'd have to get up before dawn and go out somewhere to get another one, and since it's impossible to sleep before well after midnight when the fireworks die down that's not likely to happen.
  16. It's that time of year again... What was the first bird you saw (or heard) in 2022? Mine was, as usual, a White-Eared Hummingbird:
  17. Welcome to WhatBird! I went ahead and moved the thread for you.
  18. OK I actually checked the range maps... Brown Jays occur in the northern parts of Honduras.
  19. Could be! Not all Oropendolas are beautiful singers either... I don't think Honduras has any real highlands so that should be OK!
  20. I agree with Brown Jays, but the "beautiful sounds" gives me pause LOL! In the future it would be best to be more specific about where you are in Central America; there are many different habitats and climate conditions in different parts of C.A. Assuming you weren't at a high elevation Brown Jay should fit, though.
  21. I'd call this one a Common Yellowthroat too. The eye ring does look a little bit bold but the light is hitting right there so that could be making it look more prominent. I agree that the bill size and shape, tail, and leg color fit better for C. Yellowthroat. ...(Unless it's a Chat in a Hat...or a Chapeau!)
  22. It certainly fits for a Flicker (and they are common near Antigua); the white rump, posture, and tail look right. The bill looks a little bit small/thin but it's hard to tell with this photo.
  23. That's kind of a tough shot. I don't suppose you have any other pictures? Did you write down a description, and if so, can you share it?
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