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JP48

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  1. Those would be huge numbers for my whole state.
  2. JP48

    BRDL

    Weird happening today. When I did the puzzle this morning, I was having trouble with, and ended up finding a different banding code on iBird from what I found on the list of world codes (I don't ever use this, but I was stuck). I mentioned this to another birder, and when he did the puzzle after noon he came up with a totally different bird. I didn't expect that.
  3. I chopped this from a page of protocols for a program we have in my state. I think it agrees with other responses here to this topic, but I don't know it it's any sort of official policy for eBird. It seems like a good general rule of thumb to use, though. Does my landowner-partner ‘count’ when considering ‘Number of Observers”? This depends on whether or not they are an ‘active observer’, i.e. pointing out birds that you may have overlooked, drawing your attention to singing or calling birds, identifying the birds that they are familiar with. If this is the case, you would include the landowner in the “Number of Observers”. If they are along for the ride, and you are pointing out birds to them, they would not be included in this number.
  4. In my experience, Thrashers normally repeat phrases twice, while Mockingbirds repeat 3 or more times. Also, Mockingbirds are known to sing all night. I would call that a NOMO.
  5. I'm not sure what devices it might work on (I've used it on an iPad), but there's an app called Larkwire which is OK. They just put out a version which does visual ids also, but from what I've seen that is for beginners. I haven't tried the sound id on the new version.
  6. I have a question (since this thread has devolved from it's original purpose}. In Vermont we have a fairly long-standing email group for birders. We also have what I think is a fairly recently established Facebook group. The use of the email group seems to be slowly fading, while the use of the Facebook group seems to be growing. I have personally never used Facebook, so I can't really speak to how that works for the users of this group, but my sense is that it hits only a smallish segment of the birders in the area, though I suspect it is used by beginning and casual birders (which is good), while the email group is mainly used by more dedicated birders. The question is whether people would be more likely to use a local, bird-specific chat board such as this one (Whatbird), especially would it be likely to draw a diverse (age-wise, experience-wise) as opposed to the email or Facebook platforms.
  7. I've just done a little searching, and as far as I can see there is no regional filter for Sleuth. The only reference I saw is that it uses a database of 942 species. I'm curious . What are you seeing?
  8. Out of curiosity, are any of you using a VPN? I've been finding recently that there are sites (not this one, that I remember) that I have occasional trouble getting into, but the problem disappears when I turn off the VPN
  9. You're on the right track. Assuming you have the pictures somewhere on your computer, after you click on add file you should be able to find the picture in File Explorer, then select it.
  10. We went to Trinidad a few years ago. I didn't buy cell coverage, but I took my iPad and entered the eBird lists on that, and uploaded them when I could get an internet connection. Didn't miss the phone at all, but then I don't often use it as a phone in any case.
  11. M photos are not great, but I justify that by saying that they are for the record, not for the art. However, I always rate them, mostly because I don't think they show anywhere except on the list if they're not rated. Sometimes it's a relatively rare bird, and you want others to notice it. Also, I think that the highest rated photo of each species shows up on a page for each individual hotspot. There are a couple of local hotspots where I am probably the most frequent birder, and it seems like we should provide the possibility that each species has its own photo.
  12. Looks like a Black-throated Blue Warbler. Seems like odd behavior for that one, but it must have something on its mind.
  13. Go for it. You never know, you might luck into a really warm day, say in the 50's. Here in New England we look forward to March, when we can start to get out our short-sleeved shirts. Plum Island is a good spot, if you're in Eastern MA, but you are correct to be cautious. The weather can be nasty, especially near the ocean like that, but there's no way to predict this far in advance. Could be a nice warm sunny day, or a nor'easter.
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